Review: Tamdhu Batch Strength #2 Single Malt Whisky

Tamdhu’s limited edition “batch strength” single malt whisky, an overproof bottling released in 2015, is back for a second round. As with the first batch, it is aged entirely in sherry casks and is bottled with no age statement. Abv is just 0.3 percent lower. Note that you can easily tell the different between Batch #1 and Batch #2 because the bottle label on the former is white, and on the latter it’s black.

Tasting notes are similar but not identical to the original batch. The nose is bold with banana, mango, almonds, and ample cereal character, with a hefty alcoholic kick. On the palate, you’ll find honeyed citrus first, followed by a slow fade into notes of roasted nuts, some red fruit, and stronger sherry notes. These citrus notes endure well into the finish, outweighing the cereal character that was more evident in batch #1. For what it’s worth, although the whiskies are virtually the same proof level, I find this one to be considerably more approachable at full cask strength, without water added.

117 proof.

B+ / $80 / tamdhu.com

Review: New Amsterdam Vodka (2017) and Apple Vodka

New Amsterdam’s latest flavor joins seven existing flavored vodkas, plus of course the straight original expression. We covered the original, Modesto-based New Amsterdam Vodka back in 2012, and given that five years have passed since then, we thought it was time to look at it with fresh eyes (and mouths). As well, we’ve giving New Amsterdam Apple Vodka a go.

Thoughts follow.

New Amsterdam Vodka (2017) – Quite sweet on the nose, with heavy marshmallow notes atop notes of vanilla syrup. The palate fortunately plays the sweetness down, at least at first, with a brisk and acidic attack that brings out a strong, old world, medicinal character, before it becomes awash with candylike sweetness again, lingering on the sticky finish. Ultimately this is mixer material at best. 80 proof. C+

New Amsterdam Apple Vodka – A nose of candied apple is countered by a curious almond and marzipan character, which is enchanting enough from an aromatic perspective. The palate is a different story, though, with notes of cheap applejack and bulk white wine making for a rough-hewn and mouth-puckering experience. Medicinal on the back end, and rather harsh, though some appletini fans may not mind such flavors. 70 proof. C-

both $12 / newamsterdamspirits.com

Review: Bison Ridge Special Reserve Canadian Whisky 8 Years Old

Prestige Beverage Group (known for Kinky, Glen Moray, and more) is out with a new Canadian whisky, Bison Ridge. Bison Ridge comes in two expressions, a 3 year old blend and this Special Reserve, which carries an 8 year old age statement (with aging noted in American oak). Sourcing and mashbill information are not provided.

An eight year old whisky for 20 bucks? Hold your garters, because I’ve seen it as cheap as $14.99. That’s unheard of in today’s whiskonomy.

Sadly, the whisky itself is nothing all that special. The nose is particularly Canadian, with a nutty character plus a mix of baking spices leading the charge. Vanilla and maple syrup notes are also distinct, with some sulfur character lingering at the end. On the palate, the body is immediately a bit gummy in texture, with flavors of cinnamon toast, barrel char, vanilla-flavored candies, peppermint, and jasmine. It’s a mixed bag of expected and unexpected flavor notes, with a finish that comes across like eating vanilla frosting straight out of the tub. This kind of saccharine character of course isn’t unheard of for Canadian whiskies, although one would have thought that an 8 year old would have grown out of it by this point.

80 proof.

B / $20 / prestigebevgroup.com

Review: 2016 Kim Crawford Rose Hawke’s Bay

This New Zealand rose is made from merlot grapes and presents itself as an uncomplicated, moderately sweet rose with notes of strawberry, cinnamon rolls, and a touch of balsamic character on the back end. This adds some bitterness, but also balance, which the wine seems to be in further need of. Fine for these early days of spring as an afternoon sipper, but depth is elusive.

B / $18 / kimcrawfordwines.com

Review: The Rums of Maggie’s Farm

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania-based Maggie’s Farm is focused on one spirit only: rum (plus a couple of liqueurs, one of which is a falernum). The name of the distillery hails from a Bob Dylan song, and while he didn’t mention rum production in it, a quick listen might get you into the mood to sip some of their craft-distilled goodies.

Below find our thoughts on six of the nine rum expressions the company currently produces. Production differs from product to product, so follow along closely!

Maggie’s Farm White Rum – Made from 100% raw turbinado sugar and unaged after pot distillation. Pungent with oily fuel notes, as is typical for unaged rum, with some aromas of citrus peel, lavender, and ginger. On the palate, the more industrial-tasting notes are dialed back, with notes of ripe banana and marshmallow fluff showing, though the finish is loaded up with coal dust and hints of petrol. Not unapproachable, but strictly a mixer. 80 proof.  B / $28

Maggie’s Farm La Revuelta Dark Rum – (“The uprising.”) This is a funky product that is actually a blend: Maggie’s Farm’s raw cane pot-distilled rum from Pittsburgh mixed 50/50 with a column-distilled molasses rum from Trinidad. Solid stuff here: The nose is rich and authentic, with caramel and molasses notes, strong vanilla, and some chocolate, too. Mildly floral aromas persevere, given enough time. The palate is sweet and loaded with cinnamon-heavy baking spice, applesauce, and just a hint of diesel on the back end to give it some kick. A top-notch, well-aged rum. 80 proof. A / $35

Maggie’s Farm Spiced Rum – This is the turbinado-based rum, flavored with eight different spices, “including Tahitian vanilla bean, fresh orange zest, nutmeg, and allspice.” It is not sweetened with sugar. The nose is bold with notes of lemon, vanilla, gingerbread, and evergreen Christmas notes. Enticing, it leads the way to a body loaded with those baking spices, dusky root beer notes, some green olive, and loads of vanilla. It’s strong for a spiced rum, but as promised, it’s only very lightly sweet, so let your mixer do any sugar-sweetening you need. 80 proof. B+ / $30

Maggie’s Farm Queen’s Share Unaged – “Queen’s Share Rum is made exclusively from the tail runnings of our normal cane rum distillations. Being heavier than alcohol, the flavor and aroma compounds boil off the still in a higher concentration at the end of the distillation cycle. We keep these tail runnings and re-distill them on their own. This results in a more flavorful and complex spirit. This unaged version is the unadulterated and bottled at cask strength.” Much more neutral than the standard White Rum, this is both fruitier and more floral, with a honeysuckle kick. At 57% abv, it’s hot but not scorchingly so, with a slight petrol finish, followed by some more banana. Milder than you’d think. 114 proof. B / $24 (375ml)

Maggie’s Farm Queen’s Share Rye Barrel Finish – The Unaged Queen’s Share mentioned above spends 18 months in rye whiskey barrels before bottling. The whiskey character is undeniable here, from the sweet caramel nose, loaded with rye-heavy baking spice, to the lush and clove-forward, toffee-soaked palate. Some flambed banana notes remind you that this is actually rum, not whiskey, with a finish that adds in notes of bubble gum and some fresh cherry fruit. Fun stuff, but far off the beaten path of traditional rum. 110 proof. A- / $35 (375ml)

Maggie’s Farm Queen’s Share Double Cask Finish – This is another Unaged Queen’s Share rum, finished in two types of casks for 21 months. Mysteriously, the identity of both of those casks hasn’t been revealed to me. Again it’s got a whiskey kick to it, all toffee and caramel, cut with baking spice, banana bread, and almonds. Some moderate but sharp citrus notes percolate here and there, but the sweeter notes of vanilla and creamy caramel dominate. The finish is racy with allspice and cloves, spiced nuts, and hints of gunpowder. I like the more straightforward rye finish a bit better. 110 proof. B+ / $NA

maggiesfarmrum.com

Review: Ardbeg Kelpie

A kelpie is a mythical sea creature that Scots say can be found in the lochs and bays around the island. It’s also the name of Ardbeg’s latest annual, limited-edition Committee Release, which arrives in general distribution in the coming weeks.

As always, there’s a twist in store for Islay fans: Kelpie is the first expression of Ardbeg matured in Black Sea (Russian) oak casks, an extreme rarity for barrel usage. These Russian oak casks are then married with traditional Ardbeg, which is aged in ex-bourbon barrels.

The smoky-sweet nose of Kelpie belies something unusual and non-traditional that is maddening hard to place. Ripe banana, nougat, and coconut find strange counterpoints in light notes of acetone, petrol, and oxidized white wine. The weird dichotomy continues into the palate, which kicks off with some traditional peatiness before diving headlong into a heavier petrol character that is somehow blended up with notes of sweet cream and Mexican vanilla. The finish showcases a wholly new flavor — coffee grounds — before letting the background radiation of peat smoke and barrel char linger for quite some time.

I’m typically a fan of Ardbeg when it goes “off script,” but Kelpie is so weird that it defies easy categorization and, unfortunately, unbridled enjoyment. While I appreciate how truly unique this whisky has turned out — and figure that different palates may find some of the more unusual flavors enchanting — the Russian oak has really done a number on the underlying malt, rendering it simply a bit too strange for me.

103.4 proof.

B- / $110 / ardbeg.com

Book Review: How to Drink French Fluently — A Drinker’s Guide to Joie De Vivre

How to Drink French Fluently—A Drinker’s Guide to Joie De Vivre.

How to Drink French Fluently, a book sponsored by St. Germain, is gorgeous. The photos interspersed throughout are lush and beautiful, making this a perfect coffee table book.

This book is a drinker’s guide, but it has so much more to offer than just cocktail recipes. Of course there are plenty of those from acclaimed bartenders, and each centers around St. Germain. For the elderflower liqueur lover, these thirty cocktails are sent from heaven.

The book is divided into five times of the day when a cocktail is considered appropriate—brunch, daytime, aperitif, dinner, and as a nightcap. Each section contains an explanation of the history of cocktail traditions for that time of the day and what to serve with each of the drinks during those occasions. Then come the wonderful cocktails included in each section. We have to fess up to trying nearly all of them, except for two which contain fruits not yet in season.

There is one small section near the back of the book which is particularly impressive. These pages explain how to make the unique ingredients called for in the book’s recipes. Among those ingredients are Gewürztraminer syrup, strawberry shrub, lemon cordial, St. Germain sorbet, smoked tomato-infused St. Germain, and even ice cubes made with St. Germaine. We loved the ice cubes so much, we tossed a few into a tall glass of iced tea for a new take on sweet tea.

Here are a few of our favorite cocktails from the book. Once you try them, you’ll want to try the rest.

Rivington PunchRivington Punch
1 oz. dry rosé wine
½ oz. St. Germain
1 ½ oz. Aperol
¼ oz. Combier Framboise
1 oz. soda water
1 strawberry
1 grapefruit crescent

Stir all of the ingredients in a wine glass over ice. Garnish with a strawberry and a grapefruit crescent.

Voodoo Down
2 dashes orange bitters
¼ oz. ginger syrup
¼ oz. honey syrup
¾ oz. lemon juice
½ oz. St. Germain
½ oz. Trinidadian Rum
1 oz. 12-year-old Elijah Craig bourbon

Put all ingredients into a shaker and shake with ice. Strain over ice into a double rocks glass and serve. No garnish is needed.

Voodoo DownMidnight Bouquet
1 dash grapefruit bitters (We used orange bitters instead)
½ oz. St. Germain
¾ oz. Amaro Averna
¼ oz. San Andres Alipus mezcal
1 ½ oz. añejo tequila
1 grapefruit twist

Stir all ingredients into a mixing glass with ice. Then strain into a coupe glass. Next, express the oils from the grapefruit twist over the surface before using it as a garnish.

A /$20 / [BUY IT NOW FROM AMAZON]

-->