Review: High West Bourye (2017)

The latest batch of High West’s Bourye blend of bourbon and rye whiskeys comes with a new label to boot. Now the jackalope is much larger and in full focus, better to connote the “limited sighting” that Bourye always represents.

High West normally tells you more about the individual whiskeys in each bottling, but this year it plays things a little closer to the vest (namely the ages of each individual whiskey in the blend). Here’s what we know about the 2017 release:

• A blend of straight Bourbon and Rye whiskeys aged from 10 to 14 years
• Straight Rye Whiskey: 95% rye, 5% barley malt from MGP & 53% rye, 37% corn, 10% barley malt from Barton Distillery
• Straight Bourbon Whiskey: 75% corn, 21% rye, 4% barley malt from MGP

And here’s what it tastes like.

This is a sweeter expression of Bourye (particular vs. last year’s release), which makes it dangerously easy to sip on. The nose is heavily aromatic with gingerbread, baking spices, marzipan, and candied nuts, giving it a real Christmas cake character that makes one wish it had come out two months ago. No matter, we can drink it today just as well.

On the palate, notes of apricot and orange give way to brown sugar, chocolate, molasses, and more of that spicy gingerbread character. Out of all of that, it’s lingering cloves on the finish and some smoldering burnt sugar notes, giving it just a hint of savoriness. All in all, say what you want about sourced whiskey — this just goes to show that High West knows how to find true honey barrels and blend them together with sustained and impressive skill.

92 proof. Reviewed: Batch 17A17.

A / $80 / highwest.com [BUY IT NOW FROM CASKERS]

Review: 6 Whiskeys From Mosswood Distillers

Berkeley, California-based Mosswood isn’t the first company to source whiskey and finish it before releasing, but it might be the most interesting one operating today.

All of the whiskeys reviewed here are finished, some in relatively traditional barrel types, some in extremely unusual ones. Note that with the exception of the Irish whiskey, all the other releases start with well-aged light whiskey, a seldom-seen style which is distilled to higher proof and sort of blurs the line between white whiskey and vodka when it comes off the still.

The first four whiskeys reviewed below are part of Mosswood’s standard lineup; the final two are members of the “rotating barrel” series, limited release whiskeys (both are single barrel bottlings) that will be significantly harder to come by.

All are 92 proof. No batch information is available.

Mosswood Distillers Sherry Barrel Aged Irish Whiskey – This is a four year old Irish whiskey finished for 7 months in Amontillado sherry casks. Intense, nutty sherry notes on the nose — raisiny, almost Port-like at times. On the palate, an ample hogo funk gives way to a distinctly rum-like character, the fruity raisin and wood notes combining to give the impression of molasses, dusted with notes of cloves and brown sugar. Very unusual. Fool your friends! B+ / $50

Mosswood Distillers Apple Brandy Barrel Aged Light American Whiskey – This is a seven year old light whiskey from Tennessee, finished in California Apple Brandy Barrels from Germain Robin (time unstated). What a delightful combination this is, starting with a rich and heady nose that offers hints of wood, fruit, and spices. On the palate, the apple brandy really punches up the fruit component of the whiskey, lending the caramel and vanilla in the core some hints of apple pie spice, particularly cinnamon. The finish is sweet and clean, but echoes barrel char late in the game. A- / $48

Mosswood Distillers Espresso Barrel Aged Light American Whiskey – What is an espresso barrel? This is the same seven year old Tennessee light whiskey, finished in a barrel seasoned with Four Barrel Coffee Espresso Roast. The nose is hard to place, relatively whiskey-traditionalist but with notes of cloves and some dark chocolate. The palate is where the espresso notes start to show themselves much more clearly, melding with the spices to showoff notes of fresh berries, more bittersweet chocolate, and a lingering finish that is reminiscent of chai tea. Another perplexing combination that comes out more nuanced than expected. B+ / $48

Mosswood Distillers Sour Ale Barrel Aged Light American Whiskey – Tennessee light whiskey finished in sour ale barrels from Drake’s Brewing. It’s initially moderately “beery” on the nose, with notes of hops mingling with floral notes, brown sugar, and a hard-to-pin-down note of what comes across like grapefruit peel. On the palate, all of these things come together beautifully along with notes of baking spice and gingerbread, Mexican chocolate, and, finally, a lingering, floral-heavy hoppiness on the finish. While it never really connotes the sourness of the original ale, it nonetheless does wonders with the whiskey it has to work with, elevating the spirit with an infusion of flavors I didn’t know it could show off. Highly recommended. A / $50

And now for two limited edition whiskeys…

Mosswood Distillers Umeshu Barrel Aged Light American Whiskey – These appear to have the same Tennessee whiskey base, it’s the finishing that’s off the wall. Umeshu is a tart Japanese plum wine, and Mosswood made its own, then put the umeshu in a barrel for one year. After that, the umeshu was removed and the whiskey was finished in that barrel for six months. Results: A nose that is very floral, almost perfumed, and particularly heady with alcohol despite being bottled at the same 46% abv as all the other whiskeys here. Those flowers give way to a body that is lightly tart and full of fruit — plum and otherwise — with added notes of fresh ginger, honey, red wine vinegar, and a finish that leaves notes of vanilla-heavy sugar cookies and milk chocolate on the tongue. While imperfectly balanced, the whiskey makes up for that with an exceptional uniqueness. B+ / $49

Mosswood Distillers Nocino Barrel Aged Light American Whiskey – Nocino is a walnut liqueur, and of course Mosswood makes its own; here a nine year old light whiskey goes into the emptied nocino barrel for about six months. The nose is savory, nutty, and chocolatey all at once — with encroaching aromas of overripe fruit building as it goes — but once you sip it the sweetness really takes hold. Cocoa powder, candied walnuts, and peppermint all give it an essential, wintry flavor, while a finish of maraschino cherries plus lightly bitter, slightly salty nuts remind one of that walnut liqueur. Beautiful stuff. A- / $49

drinkmosswood.com / [BUY THEM NOW FROM CASKERS]

Review: The Quiet Man Traditional and Single Malt 8 Years Old Irish Whiskey

 

Ciaran Mulgrew’s new whiskey brand hails from Northern Ireland (think Bushmills), and is named “The Quiet Man” in honor of Mulgrew’s father, a former bartender. He writes:

Now that I am making my own whiskey, I am naming it after my father. As a bartender he saw a lot of things and heard a lot of stories, but like all good bartenders, he was true to his code and told no tales. My father, John Mulgrew, “The Quiet Man”, or as they say in Ireland “An Fear Ciuin.”

Imported by Luxco, two expressions are available at present, a relatively standard blend and a single malt with an 8 year old age statement. Thoughts on each follow.

Both are 80 proof.

The Quiet Man Traditional Irish Whiskey – Triple-distilled pot still whiskey of an undisclosed mashbill, matured in bourbon barrels. This is a light but fresh and fragrant whiskey, with a brisk nose that’s heavy on lemon and honey. Light heather notes add a hint of earthy aromas. The palate follows largely in lockstep, a lightly sweet and gentle whiskey that keeps its focus on lightly sugared grains, a quick zesting of lemon peel, and a subtle but developing vanilla-chocolate note on the finish. Again, the overall experience is very light and brisk, but totally in line with what we’ve come to expect from Irish whiskey — an easygoing but not entirely complicated drinking experience. B+ / $33

The Quiet Man Single Malt 8 Years Old Irish Whiskey – Again, triple distilled pot still whiskey, but here it’s all malted barley. Also aged in first-fill bourbon barrels. This single malt still drinks with the exuberance of youth while avoiding coming across as specifically young. On the nose, heavier notes of honey, some orange peel, and a smattering of flowers give the whiskey immediate appeal. The body showcases considerable depth and power, offering an unctuous, mouth-filling grip that leads to a rich palate of toasty grains, caramel sauce, milk chocolate, and baking spice. The finish plays up the wood and toasted grain notes, which can get a little blunt at times (at 12 years, this whiskey would probably be a knockout), but even though it’s hanging on to its youth, it does manage to take its traditional Irish character and elevate it with a surprising density that many Irish whiskeys seem to lack. A- / $40  [BUY IT NOW FROM CASKERS]

thequietmanirishwhiskey.com

Review: The Macallan Highland Single Malt Edition No. 2

Macallan continues its numerical series that began last winter with The Macallan No. 1, with this natural, numerical follow-up. No. 2 is a collaboration between Macallan’s Bob Dalgarno and the co-founders of Spain’s El Celler de Can Roca, Joan, Josep, and Jordi Roca, which is considered one of the world’s top restaurants. “The Macallan Edition No. 2 brings together seven handpicked cask types from four different Spanish bodegas and cooperages to showcase the strength of co-creation and mastery,” says the company.

Continuing the diverse story of The Macallan’s oak casks and their obsession with wood, the focus remains on the commitment introduced with The Macallan Edition No. 1, to unlock the workings of the intricate whisky making process. From the provenance of the oak to the expert crafting of the cask, the seasoning and the size, it is these diverse components and, in this instance, the distinct personas of the collaborators, which have ultimately shaped Edition No.2.

Some casking details:

  • The European oak Tevasa casks selected by Bob Dalgarno define and carry the shape of Edition No. 2 with characteristic notes of rich, dried fruit.  This speaks of his ever curious, patient and empathetic character.

  • Closely following are notes of green wood and toffee from the American and European oak Diego Martin casks selected by Joan Roca. These casks bring to life the generous, reflective and passionate nature of this co-creator.

  • The notes of allspice and ginger are derived from the Jose Miguel Martin European oak casks selected by Josep Roca which denote of his complexity, warmth and maturity.

  • Finally, notes of citrus and light vanilla combine from the American oak Vasyma butts and puncheons chosen by pastry chef Jordi Roca which reflect the lively and vivacious aspects of his larger than life personality.

Despite all the talk of exotic wood, this rendition of Macallan nonetheless cuts a familiar, but quite delicious, profile. The nose is a showcase for wood, though it is gentle and rounded and integrates well with both dark caramel and fresh fruit notes, particularly green apple and some citrus. As you breathe deeper it offers some darker baking spice notes, particularly allspice and cardamom.

On the palate, chewy caramel and gentle citrus give way a cornucopia of spiced nuts, toffee, and a touch of Mexican coffee. As the finish builds, the malt remains the focus, a chewy cereal character that is well-tempered by brown sugar and baking spice. At a bit under 100 proof, it’s got the perfect alcohol level for easy sipping, exposing all its charms with just the right amount of backbone.

96.4 proof.

A / $90 / themacallan.com  [BUY IT NOW FROM CASKERS]

Drinkhacker’s 2016 Holiday Gift Guide – Best Alcohol/Spirits for Christmas

Our ninth year is under our belt, and that means our ninth annual installment of the Drinkhacker holiday gift guide — our “best stuff of the year awards” — is here. As always, the list gives you the lowdown on some of the best-rated products we reviewed over the last 12 months, with at least some eye toward availability and affordability. (Though, as you’ll see, some selections can cost a pretty penny…)

As always, the offerings below comprise a small selection of our favorite wines and spirits from the last year, and there are many other worthwhile products on the market worth considering. Feel free to sound off in the comments with suggestions for alternatives or questions about other categories or types of beverages that might be perfect for gifting.

Again, happy holidays to all of you who have helped to make Drinkhacker one of the most popular wine and spirits websites on the Internet! We look forward to providing our guidance on the world of wine, beer, and spirits as we begin our 10th year on the web and approach our 5,000th post! Stay tuned for the appropriate festivities come the big anniversary in September 2017.

And don’t forget, for more top gift ideas check out the archives and read our 2015201420132012201120102009, and 2008 holiday guides.

of-1920-rendering-jpegBourbon – Old Forester Whiskey Row Series – 1920 Prohibition Style Bourbon ($60)  As inventory pressures continue to pound bourbon country, it is becoming increasingly difficult to find solid “giftable” bourbon bottlings on the market. Rarities like the Buffalo Trace Antique Collection sell out before they ever hit shelves. This year I’m naming to my top pick something that you ought to have more luck finding, but which is just as good as anything else out there: Old Forester’s most recent Whiskey Row expression, meant to mimic bourbon made during its “medicinal” Prohibition days. Other top tipples: Col. E.H. Taylor Seasoned Wood ($70 on release, $500+ now), Blood Oath Pact No. 2 ($100), Woodford Reserve Master’s Collection Brandy Cask Finish ($100, often available for less), and, for the budget-minded, 1792 High Rye Bourbon ($36).

Scotch – Compass Box The Circus ($300) – You want to wow your loved one this year? Give them The Circus, a blend that comes complete with its own infographic outlining all the whiskies inside. It’s a complex but truly outstanding whisky worth every penny. Other top picks for 2016 aren’t going to come cheap, including Chivas Regal Ultis ($200), The Glenlivet Single Cask Edition Pullman Water Level Route ($350), Chieftain’s Linkwood 1997 17 Years Old Oloroso Sherry Finish ($90), and your best bet for an easier-to-find bottling, Glenmorangie Milsean ($130 on release but easy to find for $100 or less).

Other Whiskey – Booker’s Rye “Big Time Batch” ($300 on release) – You know who nailed it this year? Jim Murray! The crazed whiskey critic is known for his outlandishly goofy “best of the year’ picks, but he hit it perfectly with his pick of the first ever release of Booker’s Rye. The bad news: It was already a cult hit, and whatever’s left on the market is going to cost you at least $600 a bottle. More sensible options include Redemption Aged Barrel Proof Straight Rye 8 Years Old ($90), High West’s latest release of Bourye ($80), and Clyde May’s Alabama Style Whiskey Special Reserve 110 Proof ($70), which is lightly flavored with apples in the “Alabama style.”

oregonbarrelagedginbottleworkGin – Big Bottom Oregon Gin Finished in Oak Whiskey Barrels ($38) – We’ve been drowning in gin this year, which means there’s plenty of solid and unique bottlings to choose from on the market. My top pick is this one from our pals at Big Bottom, which is aged solera-style and is perfect for wintertime sipping thanks to a fun holiday spice character. For unaged expressions, check out Graton Distilling D. George Benham’s Sonoma Dry Gin ($40) or Spain’s Gin Mare ($38).

Vodka  Stolichnaya Elit Vodka ($47)  It’s more than just a fancy bottle; Stoli Elit is very good vodka, too. Beyond that, check out Vikre Lake Superior Vodka ($35) or Hangar 1 Mandarin Blossom Vodka ($35), one of the best citrus vodkas around.

Rum – Angostura Caribbean Rum 1824 12 Years Old ($60)  Great rum needn’t break the bank. Angostura 1824 is a top-notch 12 year old with all kinds of versatility. Plantation Rum Extra Old 20th Anniversary ($43) and Ron Zacapa 23 ($48) both make for awesome alternatives.

martell-blue-swift-largeBrandy – Martell Blue Swift ($50) – Martell wasn’t the first to put brandy into whiskey barrels to develop a more sophisticated, deeper flavor, but it is doing the best at it at the moment. This expression is gorgeous and cheap when it comes to Cognac. Another great, budget option is Gilles Brisson’s VSOP, a steal at $35. For the other direction, consider Hardy Noces d’Albatre “Rosebud” ($2250), one of the most exquisite sips I had this year.

Tequila – Tequila Herradura Seleccion Suprema Extra Anejo ($340) – Tons of great tequila hit this year, but I have to give the nod to Herradura and its extra anejo bottling of Seleccion Suprema, a luscious experience that every tequila lover needs to try. A smattering of top agave alternatives across the price board includes Pasote Reposado ($59), Mezcalero Release #16 Don Valente Angel Mezcal ($96), Milagro Tequila Select Barrel Reserve Anejo ($100), and Asombroso Ultrafino The Collaboration Barrel 1 ($2500).

cynar 70Liqueur – Cynar 70 ($37/1 liter) – Cynar gets a proof upgrade and a flavor boost in this new edition, which I think is an even better rendition of this classic amaro. I also can’t stop raving about Grand Poppy ($30), another amaro. Iichiko Bar Fruits Yuzu Liqueur ($11/375ml) is also highly worth picking up, as is Few Spirits Anguish & Regret Liqueur ($30), a unique spiced liqueur.

Wine  A smattering of giftable picks for the wine-lover in your life, with California showing incredibly strongly in 2016.

Need another custom gift idea (or have a different budget)? Drop me a line or leave a comment here and I’ll offer my best advice!

Looking to buy any of the above? Give Caskers and Master of Malt a try!

Tasting Report: Madeira Wine 2016

Madeira is one of the most enigmatic wine styles in the world. A fortified wine made from grapes grown on a single island and aged in a hot environment, Madeira has a flavor unlike any other wine you’ll encounter. A small variety of grapes are used, including dry sercial, medium dry verdelho, medium rich boal (or bual), and rich malvasia. Dry blends commonly known as “Rainwater” are also frequently produced.

Recently three U.S. importers visited San Francisco along with their Madeiran producers, to show off their current lineup and taste through their wares. Thoughts follow.

Tasting Report: Madeira Wines

NV Rare Wine Co Vinhos Barbeito Historic Series Baltimore Rainwater Madeira / A- / a standout of this style, lots of citrus notes, dry and fresh
NV Rare Wine Co Vinhos Barbeito Historic Series Charleston Sercial Madeira / B+ / chewy with ample dried fruit
NV Rare Wine Co Vinhos Barbeito Historic Series Savannah Verdelho Madeira / B+ / bolder, slightly tart
NV Rare Wine Co Vinhos Barbeito Historic Series Boston Bual Madeira / A- / orange peel and maple notes dominate
NV Rare Wine Co Vinhos Barbeito Historic Series New York Malmsey Madeira / A- / light coffee notes, lots of maple too  [BUY IT NOW FROM DRINKUPNY]
NV Rare Wine Co Vinhos Barbeito Historic Series Malvasia Madeira 20 Years Old / B+ / much like a tawny Port, dark cherry, heavier wood, and a quite tart finish
NV Justino’s Broadbent Rainwater Madeira / B / more herbal than most Rainwaters, lemon peel notes
NV Justino’s Broadbent Full Rich Madeira / A- / lively with fig and dried plum notes
NV Justino’s Broadbent Reserve Madeira 5 Years Old / B+ / tougher, some leather and coffee notes
NV Justino’s Broadbent Sercial Madeira 10 Years Old / B+ / slightly unbalanced, too heavy on citrus
NV Justino’s Broadbent Verdelho Madeira 10 Years Old / B / nutty, with a too-sour edge
NV Justino’s Broadbent Boal Madeira 10 Years Old / A- / pretty, chocolate and raisin notes linger
NV Justino’s Broadbent Malmsey Madeira 10 Years Old / A- / heavier nutty notes, some raisin character
1997 Justino’s Broadbent Colheita Verdelho Madeira / B+ / a powerhouse, crisp and tart, lots of citrus peel
1996 Justino’s Broadbent Colheita Madeira / A- / unknown grape variety – nice balance, caramel, cocoa, maple notes dominate; light wood finish
NV Henriques & Henriques Rainwater Madeira / B+ / 3 years old; fresh with some herbs and stronger melon notes
1998 Henriques & Henriques Medium Rich Single Harvest Madeira / B+ / ample coffee, raisin character
2001 Henriques & Henriques Sercial Single Harvest Madeira / B / very tart, some edginess, sour apple character
NV Henriques & Henriques Verdelho Madeira 15 Years Old / A- / fresher fruit notes, strawberry character, dried figs on the finish
2000 Henriques & Henriques Boal Madeira / A- / nutty with some leather and baking spice, a touch of mushroom
NV Henriques & Henriques Malvasia Madeira 20 Years Old / A / heavy fig and tea leaf, coffee bean and light caramel; exceptional balance

Review: Whiskies of Lost Distillery – Jericho, Lossit, and Towiemore

lost-distillery-large

The Lost Distillery Company is an endeavour which aims to recreate the long-gone whiskies of the dozens of “silent stills” that dot the Scottish countryside. For better or for worse, the group aims to blend up various single malts in an effort to mimic what these lost spirits might have tasted like. How? By researching still types, barley strains, wood sources, and more.

The Lost Distillery hit the scene a few years back, and it’s been diligently making historical drams ever since. The latest trio, which bring the “Classic Selection” line up to six whiskies in total, are reviewed below. All are bottled at 86 proof. (Compare to the 92 proof expressions that dropped a few years ago.) No batch information is provided.

Lost Distillery Jericho – Also known as Benachie in the U.S. (and apparently on some labels of this recreation), this eastern Highlands distillery closed in 1913. The recreation is quite a gentle expression, loaded with cereal notes, a bit of bitter orange, and some mushroom on the nose. The body moves into sweeter territory, offering a more straightforward caramel note, a bit of coconut, and some milk chocolate. Short on the finish but nonetheless enjoyable, it drinks much like many a reasonably young but otherwise standard Highlands or Speyside whisky produced today. B

Lost Distillery Lossit – A long-dead distillery, Islay-based Lossit went south in 1867. Here we have a rather classic, young Islay — this may very well be Laphroaig — though it’s quite mild on the peat. Backing up the mild smokiness are notes of fresh orange, banana, and some cotton candy, leaving the whisky with a finish that is considerably sweeter than you’d expect. What lingers on the back end isn’t smoky peat but rather a chewy, lingering experience that integrates some cooling fireplace embers into a core of butterscotch and ginger candies. There’s no way they had it this good in 1867. B+

Lost Distillery Towiemore – Born in the heart of Speyside, near Dufftown, died in 1931. The deep amber color immediately connotes sherry cask aging, and a nose full of bitter orange, old wine, and lightly musty wood notes only drives the point home. Bold on the palate, the whisky starts with a slight medicinality and moves into notes of fresh cereal, nougat, tobacco leaf, and barrel char. Though the nose says fruit, this one turns out to be all about the grain and the wood, though the finish offers just enough of a hint of tantalizing lemon and orange peel — plus a touch of mint — to send on your way with a smile. B

each $50 to $60 / lost-distillery.com  [BUY THEM NOW FROM CASKERS]

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