Review: Craft Distillers Mezcalero Release #11 Bramaderos (Miahuatlan)

MEZ_11Craft Distillers’ Mezcalero is a series of one-time batches of mezcal, similar to the ArteNOM tequila releases. Once they’re all sold, they’re gone for good. But don’t worry — in both cases, they always make more.

We first encountered Mezcalero in its second batch, and while I felt that release was a touch lackluster, it intrigued me enough to keep following the line. Mezcalero is now in its 12th release — and we just received release #11, still on the market, for review.

Mezcalero #11 is made from four types of agave: Semi-wild agave karwinskii  (madrecuishe) that grows on stalks, bicuishe, rhodacantha (Mexicano), and cultivated espadín. (Espadin is by far the most common type used in modern mezcal.) The spirit is crafted by distiller Alberto Ortiz (aka Don Beto) near Miahuatlan, Mexico.

Mezcalero #11 is silky and sweet and smoky on the nose, offering neat citrus aromas, iodine, and a persistent lacing of gentle smoke character. The body starts off gently, again pushing its citrus character along with ample notes of roasted meats (or bacon) and some menthol. The smoke builds slowly, then faster, but the sweetness holds its own throughout. The finish is rounded and seductive, a solid example of a well-crafted mezcal that has all the essentials in place.

1068 bottles produced, making this a bit easier to find than prior releases. 94.6 proof.

A- / $84 / craftdistillers.com

Nocciolata Spread Meets Partida Tequila?

nocciolataTo the guy gal who said he would stop reading the site if I kept covering unrelated food items, hear me out.

Nocciolata — an Italian (and slightly creamier) version of Nutella — wants you to pair its chocolate/hazelnut spread with Partida Reposado tequila. And they sent us a bit of both to give this oddball pairing a whirl.

I won’t belabor the point: Gooey chocolate pairs pretty well with just about anything. Consider whiskey, rum, vodka, or your favorite liqueur, and it will pair well with Nocciolata. As for the Partida, it’s a nice match too, adding some peppery notes to the silky, decadent sweetness of the chocolate spread. The vanilla in the tequila is a great companion with the chocolate, too — though I doubt any quality reposado or anejo would fail you here.

If you’ve ever had a hot chocolate spiked with tequila, you know what you’re in for. Give it a go!

about $10 per 9.52 oz jar / nocciolatausa.com /  [BUY IT NOW FROM AMAZON]

Review: LIQS Ready To Drink Cocktail Shots

liqs

LIQS looks like the ultimate expression of laziness — single-serve shots in a foil-covered plastic cup. And yeah, LIQS is designed for the beachgoer who can’t figure out how to get his blood orange kamikaze into a water bottle, but there’s a surprising level of gourmet sensibility under the hood. Billing itself as the “world’s first super premium cocktail shot,” these little shooters include ingredients ranging from kychee to cucumber to kumquat. We got three of the four flavors to shoot — er, sip on.

LIQS Vodka-Lychee-Grapefruit – Bright, lychee-driven aroma, but the palate is light on flavor. The vodka here gives it a muddy character, just lightly, sweetly fruity, with just the lightest touch of grapefruit on the back end. 45 proof. C+

LIQS Vodka-Cucumber-Lime – Maybe not a recipe for the typical frat party, the cucumber notes are overwhelming on the nose of this green shooter. The body balances the vegetal notes with ample sugar, but the lime is lacking. So-so. 45 proof. C

LIQS Tequila-Cinnamon-Orange – The only member of the family that doesn’t use vodka in the recipe. Probably the best of the bunch, too, with a clear citrus-cinnamon nose and an unassuming, gentle body. It finishes with quite a vegetal aftertaste — no Patron in this, methinks —  but it isn’t altogether unpleasant. 55 proof. C+

$18 for six 1.5-oz. shots / liqsshot.com

Review: DeLeon Tequila Reposado

Deleon ReposadoHey, remember P. Diddy’s blanco tequila, DeLeon? Well, now we’ve got the next step — DeLeon Reposado. This expression spends eight months in ex-bourbon and former French oak wine casks before bottling.

It’s a bit darker than most reposados due to the somewhat longer aging cycle, and the nose offers a light smoky character that you don’t often see in reposado tequilas. There’s lots more going on in that nose, which layers in notes of citrus, green banana, and lumberyard, with some tart and a bit off-balance vinegar character.

The body adds more complexity, but again it’s a touch out of balance. Notes of vanilla and oak are countered by some petrol overtones and an awful lot of acidity, again with notes of white wine vinegar. The overall character is peppery and punchy, which isn’t typically what I like to see in a reposado, where the wood should be holding its own against the agave.

It’s a curious and unique tequila that fans of the Mexican spirit should try, but the Platinum bottling is more assured.

80 proof.

B+ / $70 / deleontequila.com

Review: Patron Extra Anejo 7 Anos Tequila

patron A7A bottle_January 15

Patron’s latest release is this special edition — under 700 cases are available of the oldest tequila it’s ever produced — a seven year old extra anejo that may be the best thing Patron’s ever put into a bottle. Patron Extra Anejo 7 Anos has spent seven years in toasted French oak barrels, a twist from the usual aging in ex-Bourbon barrels.

Patron 7 Anos pours a lovely, light-coffee brown and offers a surprisingly complex nose of dried fruits, raisins, nuts, cinnamon and baking spice, with just a touch of agave. The body is quite incredible. It lacks that dense sugar character that so many anejos have, but rather offers a softer character, one that’s loaded with more fruit, spiced nuts, tons of allspice, and a little dark chocolate. The overall impression is slightly bittersweet and quite spicy, with another surprise on the finish — it’s quite dry on the palate, which really lets the agave come forward at last. The entire expression is well-developed, balancing, and unique, its charms really encompassing the palate in a manner you don’t typically expect with very old tequila.

Patron is unlikely to revisit this expression down the road — the stocks of this unique spirit have been depleted for this bottling run — so if all this sounds appealing — which it should — then you better snap it up quick.

80 proof. Arriving now in select markets.

A / $299 / patrontequila.com  [BUY IT NOW FROM CASKERS]

Review: Sauza 901 Silver Tequila

Sauza 901 Bottle Image

Justin Timberlake-backed 901 Tequila made a huge splash back in 2009. So huge in fact that Sauza — one of the biggest names in the business — bought the brand in 2014.

Promptly renamed “Sauza 901″ and semi-repackaged (same bottle, new label), Sauza 901 is a different product that’s made in Sauza’s own distillery.

JT is still involved with Sauza 901, but now the tequila is being positioned as a slightly higher-end alternative to Sauza’s mixtos and less expensive 100% agave brands like Hornitos. Rather than $48 a bottle for the original 901, Sauza 901 costs a mere 30 bucks. It may go without saying that Sauza 901 is going to be a different experience.

The new Sauza 901 is not a bad tequila. I’d have no qualms about whipping up a margarita with this spirit, or even sipping on it straight for a bit as I’ve been doing to write this review. But as blancos go, it isn’t going to set the world on fire. The nose is rubbery and hot with more industrial alcohol notes. Has triple distillation instead of the usual double distillation method removed too much of the character from the spirit?

The palate is heavy on the vegetal agave notes, though notes of lemon and some ripe banana bubble up from beneath. The finish is a bit oily and punchy with fuel-like notes, but that intense, black pepper-meets-greenery character hits you hard and seems to last for days. A wisp of white sugar on the finish takes things in a weirdly unexpected direction, but I can’t say it wasn’t a welcome one after what comes before.

B- / $30 / 901.com

Review: Dulce Vida Extra Anejo Tequila

dulce vida extra anejo

The arrival of a new extra anejo tequila is always cause for rejoicing, and Dulce Vida’s new bottling is no exception.

This tequila spends 5 1/2 years not in bourbon barrels but in a mix of former Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot barrels from Napa’s Rombauer winery. Crafted in the Jalisco Highlands, the tequila is fair-trade certified. The producer expects stock to last for the next two to three years.

Thoughts follow.

The nose is classic, well-aged tequila — all caramel, butterscotch, and Mexican chocolate notes. On the palate, it’s a much bolder, racier tequila than many extra anejos tend to be. Here, the agave is surprisingly pushy, offering immediate spice and black pepper notes and backed up by lots of punchy salted caramel character. Notes of rhubarb and red berries emerge, given enough time. The finish melds the two major components — racy agave and sugary caramel sauce — together, ping-ponging back and forth between the sweet and the savory. The finish is long-lasting and engaging, an exotic but approachable XO tequila that marries its seemingly disparate components together in beautiful, harmonious fashion.

100 proof.

A / $160 / dulcevidaspirits.com

Review: Mezcal Amaras

mezcal amarasThis new brand of mezcal hails from San Juan del Rio in Oaxaca. It’s a blanco made in a decidedly traditional style. To wit:

This traditional mezcal is made from Espadín agave plants grown on the hills surrounding San Juan del Rio, which are harvested at their optimum maturity by Jimadores, and roasted for 5 days in conical stone ovens over sustainable Holm Oak logs. Next, the agave hearts are ground on a horse drawn Egyptian mill, which creates an extract that naturally ferments in open pine containers for up to 13 days.  Finally, the liquid is slowly distilled twice in copper pot stills, a process which removes impurities, refines the character of the mezcal, and produces a soft, smooth flavor with a slightly smoked, citric aroma.

Amaras (“you will love”) is a bit more smoked than that description would indicate, but it does indeed have a citrusy, barbecue-like aroma that pushes right along as the palate gets a grip. Notes of pineapple, honeycomb, and melon make for some interesting appetizers before the smoky body really begins to dig in. It isn’t overbearing or particularly harsh, but it does offer a sizable amount of campfire flavors. Notes of Mexican chocolate build on the finish if you give it time, adding a layer of complexity to an otherwise fairly straightforward but extremely well-made mezcal.

82 proof. Reviewed: Lot #1 (2014), bottle 147/3300.

A- / $50 / mezcalamores.com

Review: Jose Cuervo Reserva de la Familia Tequila 2014 Edition

jose cuervo reserva 2014

I’ve said before that Cuervo’s top-shelf bottling, Reserva de la Familia, doesn’t vary much from year to year.

This year, at least the packaging is changing. Reserva de la Famila is now officially an Extra Anejo, not just an Anejo. The label has been significantly reorganized, keeping the same overall design motif but placing Reserva de la Familia front and center while shuffling Jose Cuervo off to the corner. Of course, the wooden box has also been updated in keeping with this tequila’s annual tradition. This year’s was designed by artist Carlos Aguirre, one of the foremost figures in Mexican contemporary art.

Under the hood, it’s pretty much business as usual here — molten caramel, laced with spicy, racy agave notes, dominates — while underneath some light, fresh herbal character adds nuance. Think sage and rosemary, touched with black pepper. The finish offers ample vanilla extract notes, oak, and banana.

Pitting the 2014 Reserva against the 2012 and 2008 bottlings — all that I have on hand — shows off the series’ exceptional familia resemblance, as usual. Today, the 2012 is exhibiting a stronger cinnamon note on the nose while the 2008 offers a bit more fruit — apple and pear — but on the whole they remain extremely similar. Kudos for the consistency… I think?

80 proof. Reviewed: Bottle #08753, bottled 6/24/14.

A / $100 / cuervo.com

Review: DeLeon Tequila Platinum

Deleon 69469 1

P. Diddy‘s not happy to be a major player in the world of vodka. Now he wants to rule tequila, too.

DeLeon is a new ultra-premium Highland tequila, 100% agave of course, designed to go toe to toe with Patron and other top-shelf tequila brands. Available in no fewer than six expressions — including Diamante, a joven expression, and Leona, a reserve anejo bottling that costs $825 — the most simplistic (and affordable) of the bunch is a blanco: DeLeon Platinum, which runs $60 and up. All the better to pay for the fancy, thick-glass bottle, metallic stopper, and talk of traditional clay ovens and such.

And hey, celebrity branding aside, it’s a pretty good tequila.

The nose is rich with peppery notes, but also hints at lemon custard, along with some vanilla-dusted creme brulee notes. It’s got the character of a classic blanco, but it also hints at austerity — despite the fact that this is a completely unaged and unrested tequila. The body continues the theme: Spicy agave, bright lemon juice — almost candied with a sweet edge — honey, and touches of menthol. It’s very mild, and extremely easy-drinking — the same qualities that make Patron so very popular.

DeLeon Platinum is a tequila that doesn’t exactly pump up the agave, but it doesn’t try to mask it, either. Rather, it takes the natural herbal character of blanco tequila, then tosses in some natural complementary flavors that add subtlety and complexity. The end product may be on the lighter side — so approach DeLeon with the appropriate attitude — but that may suit many tequila drinkers just fine.

80 proof.

A- / $60 / deleontequila.com