Cocktail Recipes for Fall 2017

Thunderstruck

With the changing weather and all the busy things going on in our lives during the fall, we wanted to share with you a few cocktails to settle down with when your day is finally done. We’ve also included a punch recipe for when you have friends over, and to finish it up, check out a barbecue ribs recipe — because ribs aren’t just for summertime cookouts.

Thunder Struck
courtesy of SOCIAL Costa Mesa, CA
1 oz. Novo Fogo Silver Cachaça
½ oz. Atlantico Reserve rum
1 ½ oz. smoked butternut squash purée
1 oz. Thunderking Chai cold brew
½ oz. cinnamon syrup
2 dashes Scrappy’s Bitters
1 egg white

Hard shake all ingredients, and double fine strain into large snifter over a big ice rock. Garnish with grated fresh cinnamon and one fresh sage leaf.

Bold and smokey

The Bold and Smokey
by Gabriel Rieben, Dullboy Bar
1 oz. Paul John Bold Whisky
1 oz. Stolen Smoked Rum
½ oz. Gran Classico bitter liqueur
½ oz. St. George Spiced Pear Liqueur

Stir all ingredients in a mixing glass with ice. Strain into a Nick and Nora glass, then serve.

Autumn Alexander
created by April Wachtel, CEO/Founder, Swig and Swallow
1 part Amarula
1 part bourbon
coffee dust
orange zest

Build ingredients in a mixing glass. Add ice, stir 20-30 seconds and strain over crushed ice. Grate coffee dust and orange zest over the cocktail as a garnish.

Cruzan Hot Buttered Rum
1 part Cruzan Single Barrel Rum
2 heaping spoonfuls batter
steaming hot water

Fill coffee mug 1/2 full with hot water. Stir in batter until dissolved. Add rum and top with steaming hot water. Serve with a cinnamon stick as a stir stick.

To make the batter:
1 lb. brown sugar
1/2 lb. salted butter
4 tsp. pumpkin spice seasoning
1 tsp. vanilla extract

Mix together in a pan and heat on medium, stirring until all the sugar is dissolved and you have a syrup consistency. Keep unused portions in the refrigerator for other cocktails or more of this one.

Orchard Hour

Orchard Hour
created by Allan Roth, Glenfiddich Ambassador
2 parts Glenfiddich 15 Year Solera Reserve
½ part Montenegro
¼ part Calvados
¼ part Amontillado Sherry
lemon twist, to garnish

Stir all ingredients except the lemon twist over ice. Strain into a coup glass or over one large ice cube in a rocks glass. Express a lemon twist over the drink and discard before serving.

Golden Pineapple
by Miguel Aranda of The Black Lodge

2 oz. BenRiach 10 Year Old Peated Curiositas
3/4 oz. lime juice
1/2 oz. walnut liqueur
1/2 oz. orgeat
1 oz. pineapple juice

Mix all ingredients and serve over crushed ice in a copper cup. Garnish with mint and a lemon peel.

Mai Tai Saga

Mai Tai Saga
by Chris Zulueta of Sylvain, New Orleans
2 oz. Mizu Shochu
1/4 oz. Orgeat
1/4 oz. Maraschino Liqueur
1/2 oz. Rothman and Winter Pear Liqueur
1 oz. lime juice
1 dash Bittermen’s Tiki Bitters
1 sprig of fresh mint for garnish

Combine all ingredients into a shaker with ice. Shake and strain over ice in a rocks glass. Garnish with the mint sprig and enjoy.

Solera Sidecar
by Joaquín Simó of Pouring Ribbons, New York
1 1/2 oz. cognac V.S.O.P.
1/2 oz. Lustau East India Solera Sherry
1/2 oz. fresh lemon juice
1/4 oz. Pierre Ferrand Dry Curaçao
1/4 oz. Lazzaronni Amaretto
1/4 oz. simple syrup

Combine all ingredients into a shaker with ice. Strain into a coupe glass. No garnish is needed.

Honey and Smoke

Honey and Smoke
1 part honey simple syrup
2 parts Miel de Tierra mescal
2 parts ginger beer
juice from ½ lime

Combine simple syrup, mescal, and lime juice in tumbler. Shake for 10 seconds. Pour over ice and top off with ginger beer. Garnish with lime slice. Optional glass garnish: salt rim of glass with Jalapeño salt or sea salt.

To make the honey simple syrup:
1 part honey
1 part water

Boil water and pour over honey in a bowl. Whisk to combine.

“PSL” Smirnoff Caramel Punch
12 oz. Smirnoff Caramel Vodka
8 cups cream soda
pumpkin spice syrup
espresso syrup

Combine Caramel Smirnoff and cream soda in a larger pitcher or punch bowl. Add pumpkin spice syrup and espresso syrup to taste. Stir and add ice (if serving immediately). Garnish individual servings with a dash of cinnamon or a cinnamon stick.

If you prefer to make your own syrups:

Espresso Syrup
from Martha Stewart
½ cup brewed espresso coffee
¼ cup sugar
¼ cup water

Boil until the sugar is dissolved and you have a syrup consistency.

Pumpkin Spice Syrup
from OneSweetMess.com
1 1/2 cups water
3/4 cup light or dark brown sugar
1 cup granulated sugar
2 tsp. ground cinnamon
1/2 tsp. ground ginger
1/2 tsp. ground cloves
1/2 tsp. ground nutmeg
1/4 cup pumpkin puree
1 1/2 Tbsp. vanilla extract

Add water and both sugars in a medium saucepan. Simmer on medium-low heat until the sugar dissolves, about 4 minutes. Turn the heat down to low and whisk in cinnamon, ginger, cloves, nutmeg, and pumpkin puree. Simmer for 8 minutes, stirring occasionally. Do not allow the mixture to come to a boil. Remove from the heat and strain through a mesh strainer lined with cheese cloth or a very thin, clean tea towel.

Allow the syrup to cool to room-temperature before stirring in the vanilla extract. Store in a mason jar or airtight container. The syrup will last for 1 month at room-temperature or 3 months in the refrigerator.

Strongbow Gold Apple Smoked, Sauced and Spiked Ribs

Strongbow Gold Apple Smoked, Sauced and Spiked Ribs

Ribs
1 rack baby back pork ribs, 3 lbs. or less
1/2 cup BBQ spice mix
2 cups Applewood chips

Mop
1 cup apple cider vinegar
6 oz. Strongbow Gold Apple Cider
2 Tbsp. Dijon mustard
1 apple, thinly sliced
red pepper flakes

Strongbow Apple BBQ Sauce
6 oz. Strongbow Gold Apple Cider
5.5 oz. can tomato paste
1/2 sweet onion, finely diced
1/2 apple, finely diced
1/4 cup BBQ spice mix
1/2 cup applesauce
1/2 cup honey
1/2 cup red wine vinegar
1/4 tsp. cayenne pepper
Kosher salt to taste

To prepare the ribs, rub them all over with the BBQ seasoning mix (available in the grocery market spice aisle). Wrap the ribs in plastic wrap and let set in the refrigerator for at least an hour, up to overnight.

Make the mop sauce by combining all ingredients in a glass jar. Place by the grill. (You can use the oven for this recipe as well but a grill works best.)

Prepare a charcoal or gas fire. If using charcoal, bank all the charcoal on one side of the grill. Arrange the grates so that you can add more charcoal without removing the cooking grate, if possible. Form a tray out of aluminum foil large enough to hold the wood chips. Sprinkle water over the chips. Place the chips by the coals or over a lit burner if using gas. The ideal temperature is 250 degrees. This is easier to achieve with gas, but with practice and patience can be achieved with charcoal.

When the chips are smoking and the grill has reached around 250 degrees, place the ribs on the coolest part of the grill (farthest from coals or burner), bone side down. Close lid. Monitor the temperature and the smoking chips, and apply the mop sauce every 15 minutes. If the chips get too hot and start burning, sprinkle them with water. Check on doneness after 90 minutes. The rib bones should be sticking out, and if the rack is held by tongs on one end they should bend, but not break. If unsure, smoke for another 30 minutes.

While the ribs are smoking, make the Strongbow Gold Apple BBQ sauce. Mix all the ingredients together in a saucepan and simmer on low for 15-30 minutes, depending on preference of thickness.

Let the ribs rest a minimum of 30 minutes, then cut the bones individually from the rack. Serve with the sauce and enjoy.

Cocktail Recipes for Thanksgiving 2017

Pumpkin spice mule

Here at Drinkhacker, we are thankful for you—our drinking readers! Among the other things we’re thankful for are good food, good friends, and good cocktails. May these cocktails and snack recipes be among them on your holiday table.

Baileys pumpkin caramel apple

Caramel Apple
created by NYC mixologist Allison Kave of Butter and Scotch
2 oz. Baileys Pumpkin Spice Irish Cream
1 oz. Dickel Rye
1 cup apple cider
apple cider doughnut holes for garnish
caramel apple slices for garnish
whipped cream for garnish
caramel drizzle for garnish

In a saucepan, combine Baileys Pumpkin Spice, Dickel Rye, and apple cider over medium heat for ten minutes. Stir well. Pour contents into a coffee mug. Top with skewer of apple cider doughnut holes alternating with caramel apple slices. Garnish with whipped cream and caramel drizzle. This makes 2 servings.

‘Tis The Spritzer
created by Cody Goldstein, Founder of Muddling Memories
2 parts Tres Agaves Reposado Tequila
1 part blood orange juice
1/2 part Aperol
1/2 part cranberry juice
champagne, to fill
cranberries, to garnish

Add all the ingredients into a shaking tin and fill with a handful of ice. Shake for 5 seconds and strain into a Collins glass. Top with champagne and garnish with a few cranberries.

Hot buttered cachaca

Hot Buttered Cachaça
courtesy of Amanda Platt of The Public House by Evans Brewing Co.
2 oz. Novo Fogo Silver Cachaça
pureed real butter
1/8 cup brown sugar
cinnamon sticks
star anise
apple cider (we used Strongbow)

In a small pan, bring the apple cider, cinnamon sticks, and star anise to a boil. Mix the pumpkin, butter, and brown sugar. In a mug or hot coffee glass pour the Cachaça and whisk in a tablespoon of the roasted pumpkin mix. Top off with the spiced cider and serve hot.

Brockmans Berry Fresh
2 oz. Brockmans gin
1 oz. Lejay Lagoute Triple Sec
3/4 oz. lemon juice
1 oz. cranberry juice
1 bar spoon of Allspice Dram
frozen cranberries

Shake all ingredients together in an ice-filled cocktail shaker; strain into a tumbler of crushed ice layered with frozen winter berries (note: use cranberries or other edible berries because true Winter Berries are poisonous); then top with a little more crushed ice. Garnish with a few more frozen cranberries.

Pilgrims punch

Pilgrim’s Punch
created by Pamela Wiznitzer of Seamstress NYC
1 oz. Kerrygold Irish Cream Liqueur
1 oz. aged rum
4-5 oz. boiling hot chai tea
6 oz. fresh heavy cream

Mix the Kerrygold and fresh heavy cream. Stir in the hot chai. Top with the rum and serve hot.

Americano in Appennino
by Jacopo Misiano of Alchimista Pistoia
1 oz. Bitter Tuvè
1 oz. Vermouth Drapò Rosso
½ oz. bourbon
½ oz. honey
4 smashed blueberries
chopped chestnut
sparkling soda

Stir all ingredients except the soda, chestnut, and blueberries. Strain in a low tumbler; top with the soda and garnish with the chestnut and blueberries before serving.

Full Harvest

Full Harvest
created by Shaun Meglen of Péché, Austin, TX
2 oz. Basil Hayden bourbon
3/4 oz. limoncello
1/2 oz. orange juice
1/4 oz. lemon juice
1/4 oz. cinnamon simple syrup
1 dash of cranberry bitters
1 egg white

Shake all ingredients hard with ice. Strain into and serve up in coupe glass.

Pumpkin Spiced Mule
3 oz. Smirnoff No. 21 Vodka
1 1/2 oz. cinnamon pumpkin maple puree
1 oz. lemon juice
4 oz. ginger beer
4-6 cinnamon sticks
1 qt. simple syrup
2 Tbsp. real maple syrup.

Take 1 ½ oz. of cinnamon pumpkin maple puree and mix with Smirnoff and lemon juice. Stir to combine, then pour into copper Moscow Mule mugs filled with ice. Top with ginger beer; garnish with a lemon wheel and grated cinnamon. This recipe makes two.

To make the cinnamon pumpkin maple puree:
Toast 4-6 cinnamon sticks in a 2 qt. sauce pan until aromatic. Add 1 qt. simple syrup; heat until boiling. Remove from heat and let stand for 10 minutes. Blend on high for about 20 seconds; then filter through a fine sieve. Add 1/4 cup pumpkin puree and 2 Tbsp. maple syrup. Whisk until smooth.

Evening in the Empire
by Meaghan Levy of Rose Hill Bar & Lounge, HGU Hotel
1 1/2 oz. BenRiach 10 Year Old Peated Curiositas
3/4 oz. Neversink pear liqueur
1/2 oz. Cinnamon and cacao nib infused Laird’s Applejack
1/4 oz. Del Professor sweet vermouth

Combine all ingredients in a mixing glass, stir. Serve in a tulip glass and top with hazelnuts.

Winter Hill Punch
8 parts toasted hazelnut-infused Drambuie
4 parts Glenfiddich 12 Years Old
1½ parts Cardamaro
4 parts pomegranate syrup
4 parts fresh lemon
8 dashes Angostura Bitters
16 parts club soda
20 parts Brut sparkling wine

In a punch bowl add all ingredients and slowly stir with large ice block. Add garnishes and serve well chilled. Garnish with Lemons wheels and 1 inch rosemary sprigs. Serve in punch cup.

To make toasted hazelnut-infused Drambuie:
Toast nuts over medium heat until browned and you can easily smell toasted aroma. For every 1 part of Drambuie, add ½ part of toasted nuts. Let infuse in airtight container for 24 hours. Strain and reserve for use.

Because everyone has their traditional recipes for the turkey or ham Thanksgiving dinner, we decided to give you a couple of recipes for things you can use for a party or just parked in front of the television watching football or a movie. Pumpkin Cheesecake Dip and Sweet Potato Chips are both easy to make and very yummy.

Pumpkin cheesecake dip

Pumpkin Cheesecake Dip
courtesy of Melissa Russo at thefarmgirlgabs.com
8 ounce package of cream cheese, softened
2 cups powdered sugar
15 oz. can of Libby’s pumpkin
2 Tbsp. pumpkin pie spice
1 tsp. pure vanilla (we used 1 Tbsp. of bourbon instead!)

Add softened cream cheese and sugar to a mixing bowl. Mix until smooth. Add pumpkin, vanilla, and pumpkin pie spice; then mix well. Transfer to serving bowl; cover and chill for 4 hours. Serve with apple slices, pear slices, ginger snaps, or graham crackers. (We used salted caramel Biscotti, pictured.)

Marigold Sweet Potato ChipsSweet potato chips
courtesy of wearecocina.com
2 sweet potatoes
2 Tbsp. plus 1 Tbsp. olive oil, divided
1/4 tsp. sea salt
1 package edible gold glitter (optional)

Preheat oven to 450 degrees. Wash your sweet potatoes and slice very thin using a mandolin (We made ours thicker because we just like them that way; they did take longer to bake.) In a large mixing bowl, add your sweet potato slices, olive oil, and salt. Mix well to coat all sides of the potato slices. Place onto large sheet pan in a single layer. Bake for about 10 minutes or until crisp. Remove from the oven and let cool for 5 minutes. In a large mixing bowl, toss the chips in 1 Tbsp. of olive oil and glitter. Serve right away with salsa, guacamole, or sour cream and enjoy the magic!

Review: The Botanist Islay Dry Gin (2017)

In 2012 we looked at The Botanist, a gin produced at Bruichladdich distillery on the Scottish island of Islay, where peaty Scotch is the order of the day. It remains the only gin produced on this island, though the brand has seen some changes, namely with a striking new bottle design, meant to turn away imitators and prevent consumer confusion. The recipe remains the same, however, with 22 ingredients, many of which are grown on the island, making up the bill.

For history’s sake, here’s the complete botanical list again: Angelica root *, Apple Mint, Birch leaves, Bog Myrtle leaves, Cassia bark *, Chamomile (sweet), Cinnamon bark *, Coriander seed *, Creeping Thistle flowers, Elder flowers, Gorse flowers, Heather flowers, Hawthorn flowers, Juniper (prostrate) berries, Juniper berries *, Lady’s Bedstraw flowers, Lemon Balm, Lemon peel *, Liquorice root *, Meadow Sweet, Orange peel *, Orris root *, Peppermint leaves, Mugwort leaves, Red Clover flowers, Sweet Cicely leaves, Tansy, Thyme leaves, Water Mint leaves, White Clover, Wood Sage leaves. (* = Non Islay Botanical)

Tasting the gin again from a fresh bottle in 2017, it’s clear that The Botanist is one of the top gins on the market, a versatile gin that is highly worth seeking out no matter what your favorite gin tipple is. The nose remains lively and enticing, a melange of juniper, sage, forest floor, and scorched orange peel. On the palate, the gin really shines, a modest juniper slug tempered by slightly sweet notes of citrus, savory herbs, cinnamon sticks, and a bit of licorice. Mint is particularly evident on the finish. Best of all, the gin’s balance is utterly perfect, the various components melding into a cohesive whole that is better than the some of its parts, and which, again, drinks beautifully despite the relatively high alcohol level.

Still exceptional!

92 proof.

A / $46 / bruichladdich.com [BUY IT NOW FROM CASKERS]

Check out these Botanist original recipes, all of which are worthwhile additions to your cocktail repertoire.

Pine for Islay
1.5 oz The Botanist Gin
.75 oz Fresh Squeezed Lime Juice
.75 oz Small Hands Pineapple Syrup

In a cocktail shaker, add The Botanist Gin, fresh squeezed lime juice and pineapple syrup. Add ice and shake. Strain into rocks glass filled with large ice cube. Garnish with cilantro leaves in the center of the glass.

Fino Fix
1.5 oz Pink Peppercorn-Infused Botanist Gin
.75 oz Fresh Squeezed Lemon Juice
.75 oz Tio Pepe Fino Sherry
.5 oz Simple Syrup
1 Strawberry

In cocktail shaker, muddle 1 strawberry. Add The Botanist Gin, fresh squeezed lemon juice and Sherry. Shake and strain into Coupe Glass. Garnish with halved strawberry on side of glass.

Wisemen’s Negroni
1.5 oz The Botanist Gin
.75 oz Carpano Antica Formula Sweet Vermouth
.25 oz Suze
2 Sage Leaves

In a mixing glass, add all ingredients. Fill with ice and stir for 15-20 seconds. Strain into rocks glass filled with large ice cubes. Garnish with 2 sage leaves resting on top of ice.

Bitter Fizz
1.5 oz The Botanist Gin
.5 oz Cappelliti Vino Aperitivo
.5 oz Carpano Antica Formula Sweet Vermouth
.5 oz Small Hands Orgeat
2 drops Housemade Fig Bitters
3 oz Soda Water

In highball, build all ingredients and add ice. Top with soda water. Garnish with a quartered fresh fig.

Recipe: Sweet Effort

We’ve written about the Tahona Society Cocktail Competition in the past, where tequila is the name of the game and where bartenders from all over the world compete to create a unique cocktail. The most recent installment concluded with this winner from Jeppe Nothlev of Helium bar in Copenhagen, Denmark.

It’s a sweet little number with lots of complexity — though the rhubarb syrup may be a bit tricky to obtain. (Olmeca Altos — now often going by just Altos — provided us a pre-mixed sample, making this a bit easier.)

Sweet Effort
50ml Altos Plata tequila
10ml Pedro Ximénez sherry
30ml rhubarb syrup
30ml lime juice
dash of egg white
grapefruit soda

Mix the Altos Plata, Pedro Ximénez Sherry, rhubarb syrup, lime juice and egg white, shake and pour into a highball glass and top with grapefruit soda.

How to Make the Perfect Sazerac Cocktail

So you’ve mastered mixing the manhattan, the old fashioned is old news, and you can recite the difference between a gin martini and a vodka martini in your sleep. And yet, that classic cocktail itch is still there. Well read on, because today we’re going to explore another simple, early cocktail, one that isn’t as well-known as the others. If you want to impress your whiskey cocktail-loving friends, try to mix up a Sazerac and see what they think.

The story of the Sazerac goes back to New Orleans in the 1830s, where apothecary Antoine Amédée Peychuad began providing Cognac toddies using a bitters of his own design. The toddies became such a local sensation that a bar called the Sazerac Coffee House began buying his bitters to use in their own cocktail, mixing Cognac with absinthe, bitters, and sugar to make the Sazerac, which is claimed to be the first-ever ‘branded’ cocktail (the old fashioned was around at the time, but was generally just referred to as a ‘cocktail’). Eventually, the Sazerac Coffee House simply bought the rights to Peychaud’s bitters entirely, and when an insect epidemic destroyed French vineyards used to make cognac, the heart of the drink was switched to rye whiskey. In a big blow for Sazerac lovers, absinthe was banned in the US in 1912, and for the next hundred years Sazeracs generally used an anise-flavored liquor called Herbsaint in its place, though in these enlightened days absinthe is freely available again. Now that you know the history, let’s gather our materials and see what we can do with NOLA’s historic (and official) drink.

The ingredients for a Sazerac might sound familiar if you make a lot of classic cocktails: a sugar cube or sugar syrup, 1.5 ounces of rye whiskey (bourbon if you’re a modernist; Cognac if you’re feeling really old school), a quarter ounce of Herbsaint or absinthe, three dashes of Peychaud’s bitters, and a lemon peel for garish. The Sazerac company, no longer a meager bar but now an enormous multinational corporation most well-known for owning Buffalo Trace, of course recommends its own Sazerac brand rye for the job, which is a solid, spicy, and fairly inexpensive choice. We here at Drinkhacker are always fans of Utah-based rye wizards High West, or for a rounder drink you can try Old Grand-Dad’s rye-heavy bourbon. For bitters, there’s only one choice: the Sazerac was built around Peychaud’s bitters, and without it, it’s hardly a Sazerac at all. Peychaud’s is lighter and more floral than the more commonly-used Angostura bitters, and will highlight different aspects of the rye in the glass. The choice of absinthe isn’t quite as vital as the choice of rye, since as you’ll see you really use a very small amount of it, but Lucid is a perennial favorite in our Sazeracs. Just like with an old fashioned, sugar syrup works just as well as a sugar cube and requires much less work, but if you’re serving for guests and want to go through the whole ritual, muddling a sugar cube will add to the mystique.

Now that you have your materials, let’s start making the drink! First, pack an old fashioned glass with ice, and in a second glass mix the sugar with the bitters. If you’re using a sugar cube, pour the bitters on top of it before muddling; if you’re using syrup, just make sure it’s well-mixed with the bitters. Add the 1.5 ounces of whiskey to the glass with the sugar and bitters and stir well — don’t shake. Now that your first glass is sufficiently chilled, dump the ice and add the absinthe. You’re really just using the absinthe to coat the glass, swirl it around good and get it on as much of the inside surface as you can, and then discard the remainder. Finally, add the contents of the second glass to the old fashioned glass with the absinthe rinse. Garnish with a thin slice of lemon peel, and enjoy!

The Sazerac might sound a lot like an old fashioned, but the change in bitters and the addition of the absinthe both show that little things can have a big impact on our cocktails, in this case giving the drink a more complex, herbal character. It’s a unique treat for fans of classic cocktails, and is sure to impress at your next gathering. Try it out and let us know what you think in the comments, and as always, if there are things you’ve always wondered about in the world of alcohol but have been afraid to ask, send us an e-mail to [email protected]

NaNoWriMo Special: Great Authors’ Great Cocktails

It’s that time again. November is National Novel Writing Month, or NaNoWriMo, where authors of all ages and experience levels challenge themselves to write a 50,000-word novel in a mere 30 days. Whether you’re already hard at work on your next opus, or you’re getting things ready for an attempt next year, get those creative juices flowing with a look at four great Jazz-age authors and the cocktails they loved.

Ernest Hemingway

“The world breaks everyone, and afterward, many are strong at the broken places.”

Notable works: The Old Man & The Sea, The Sun Also Rises, For Whom the Bell Tolls

Hemingway is one of the literary titans of the so-called ‘Lost Generation’ writers who were prolific after World War I, a group of bitter young souls who crafted dark, nihilistic prose to strike out against a dark, nihilistic world. Hemingway was almost as famous for his drinking habits as he was for his literary work; this is a man who had a granddaughter named after the French Bordeaux wine Château Margaux. There is enough brainpower put behind Hemingway’s drink of choice that there are debates about which he truly loved the most: was it the mojito, invented in his home-away-from-home in Havana, Cuba? Or the daiquiri, supposedly sipped while he wrote The Old Man & The Sea? We’ll put both drinks down here and the reader can decide which one is more effective as a source of inspiration.

Mojito

1 1/2 oz white rum, 1 oz lime juice, 2 tsp sugar, 6 mint leaves, soda water.

Muddle mint, lime juice, and sugar in a glass of ice. Add rum and top off with soda. Garnish with a sprig of mint.

Daiquiri

1 1/2 oz white rum, 1/2 oz simple syrup, 1 oz lime juice.

Pour all ingredients into a shaker full of ice. Shake well and strain into a chilled cocktail glass.

Truman Capote

“To me, the greatest pleasure of writing is not what it’s about, but the music the words make.”

Notable works: Breakfast at Tiffany’s, In Cold Blood

Truman Capote perfected the art of the literary celebrity, by using his fame from writing pioneering nonfiction works such as In Cold Blood and his larger-than-life force of personality to get adoration from the people around him. A gay man who refused to let himself be ignored by society, Capote took many lovers, hosted massive gala events, partied with Andy Warhol in the ’70s, and remained a dear friend to Harper Lee, author of To Kill a Mockingbird. Capote’s drink of choice was the screwdriver, a simple drink with a taste as big and flashy as Capote himself.

Screwdriver

1 3/4 oz vodka, 3 1/2 oz orange juice.

Mix all ingredients in a highball glass filled with ice. Garnish with a thin orange slice.

Dorothy Parker

“The first thing I do in the morning is brush my teeth and sharpen my tongue.”

Notable works: Enough Rope, A Star is Born

While Dorothy Parker doesn’t have a work that stands up to In Cold Blood or The Sun Also Rises, the New York-based poet and essayist had a fiery wit that endures to this day. Parker wrote for Vanity Fair, Vogue, The New Yorker, and countless other famous magazines, and eventually parlayed that success into a time screenwriting for Hollywood, where she was nominated for a Best Screenplay Oscar for A Star is Born. Parker had a known love of the whiskey sour, and she wrote of the effects of too much drink in many acerbic poems.

Whiskey Sour

1 1/2 oz whiskey, 1 oz lemon juice, 1/2 oz simple syrup.

Pour all ingredients into a shaker full of ice. Shake gently and strain into an ice-filled old fashioned glass. Garnish with a maraschino cherry.

Raymond Chandler

“As honest as you can expect a man to be in a world where its going out of style.”

Notable works: The Big Sleep, The Long Goodbye

Next to Dashiell Hammett, author of The Maltese Falcon, Raymond Chandler is the most influential author on the world of mystery fiction, with every good mystery novel written since the 1939 publication of The Big Sleep at least partially influenced by Chandler’s novel, and his protagonist Philip Marlowe. Like Capote and Parker, Chandler also dabbled in screenwriting, best known for working on the script to Alfred Hitchcock’s Strangers on a Train. Chandler, like Ian Fleming with James Bond, used his literary creation to popularize a drink of choice; Philip Marlowe was fond of gimlets in The Long Goodbye, and the detective’s preference for the drink led to the gimlet really catching on in America.

Gimlet

2 oz gin, 2/3 oz sweetened lime juice (Chandler specified Rose’s Lime Juice).

Mix all ingredients into a mixing glass full of ice, strain into a cocktail glass. Garnish with a slice of lime.

* * *

Are you braving NaNoWriMo this month? Do you have a favorite boozy author that didn’t make the list? Let us know in the comments!

Cocktail Recipes for Halloween 2017

Whether you celebrate Halloween, All Saint’s Day, or Day of the Dead, you need a solid cocktail to go along with it. Here’s a selection of our favorites from the year, along with a recipe for Caramel Pumpkin Monkey Bread. It’s quick and yummy for any celebration you have planned.

First we start off with two wine cocktails, both of which come from Apothic.

Apothic Midnight Blossom
2 oz. Apothic Dark red blend wine
1/2 oz. crème de violette
¼ oz. elderflower liqueur
2 blackberries, muddled
3 oz. champagne

In a cocktail shaker, pour Apothic Dark first, followed by liqueurs and muddled berries. Strain and serve into a champagne flute. Top with champagne and a lemon twist. (If you want to be fancy, take a lemon peel slice–cut into a round–and then cut out a Jack O’ Lantern face in it; a cut at the bottom will allow you to slide it onto the glass rim.)

Dash of Fire

Dash of Fire
1 ½ oz. rye whiskey
1 ½ oz. Apothic Inferno whiskey barrel aged red wine
1/4 oz. sweet vermouth
4 cherries, muddled
dash of bitters (we used Critter Bitters from Seven Stills)

In a cocktail shaker, muddle cherries, bitters, and sweet vermouth. Add ice and shake until chilled. Strain and serve into a martini glass. Top with a cherry and splash of cherry juice.

Dia de los Muertes Blood Orange Sour
courtesy of the Tuck Room, NYC
2 oz. infused Pelotón de la Muerte Artisan Mezcal
1 oz. blood orange juice (or ½ oz. blood orange puree)
½ oz. black lime juice
½ oz. agave syrup

Shake and strain into a black-salt-rimmed, ice-filled rocks glass.

Note: Infuse 750 ml. bottle of Mezcal overnight with the zest of 7 limes of 3 crushed black limes. Black Salt is a black lava Salt from Hawaii, which tastes like a beautiful mineral salt.

Pumpkin Spice Negroni

Pumpkin Spice Negroni
created by Mia Mastroianni, Soho H
ouse West Hollywood and Bar Rescue
1 oz. Campari
1 oz. Bulldog Gin
3/4 oz Frangelico
1/2 oz. pumpkin puree infused syrup
egg white

Combine all ingredients and dry shake. Re-shake with ice and strain into a small pumpkin (or coupe). Garnish with a light dusting of cinnamon and pumpkin seeds before serving.

Reyka’s Passion Fruit Potion
courtesy of Reyka Vodka
¾ part Reyka Vodka
¾ part gin
¾ part passion fruit syrup
½ part Peychaud’s bitters
¼ part lime

Combine all ingredients together in a cocktail shaker. Shake, strain, and garnish with a grilled peach slice.

To make passion fruit syrup
3/4 cup Goya passion fruit juice
1/4 cup lime juice
1 cup sugar

Combine and stir until sugar is dissolved.

Blood Bath

Blood Bath
by SakéOne
3 oz. Tombo Saké
6 black raspberries (fresh or frozen)
1/2 oz. simple syrup
1/4 oz. lemon/lime juice

Pour Tombo over ice in a shaker, then add berries and remaining ingredients. Shake vigorously. Serve in sugar rimmed martini glass.

The Angry Spell
courtesy of Angry Orchard

4 oz. Angry Orchard Crisp Apple (or the new Pear) Hard Cider
1 oz. white rum
3/4 oz. lime juice
1/2 oz. ginger syrup
1/2 oz. Creme de Cassis or Creme de Mure

Add white rum, lime juice and ginger syrup to shaker. Strain into Collins glass with ice. Top with Angry Orchard Crisp Apple and Crème de Cassis. Garnish with a lime wheel and blackberries.

To make ginger syrupAngry Spell
1 cup finely chopped fresh ginger
2 cups sugar
2 cups water

Combine in a small sauce pan. Heat and stir until the sugar is dissolved. Allow to cool before using and strain out any ginger bits.

The Velvet Vampire
courtesy of Kelly Fell, The Duke and Elephant Food and Spirits
2 oz. Old Overholt Rye Whiskey
2 tsp. St-Germain Elderflower Liqueur
1 1/2 oz. pumpkin juice
1 tsp. house made hibiscus juice (infused with lemon and orange)
1/2 oz. fresh lime juice
1/2 oz. simple syrup
1/2 oz. ginger juice

Combine all ingredients in shaker with ice. Shake. Serve in chilled glass with ice.

Pumpkin Spice Shotte

Pumpkin Spice Shotte
courtesy of Captain Morgan
1 oz. Captain Morgan Jack-O’Blast pumpkin spiced rum
1 oz. Captain Morgan LocoNut coconut rum
2 oz. cold brew (We used coffee but you could also use a stout beer.)
whipped cream
cinnamon
caramel sauce

Combine Jack-O’Blast, LocoNut, and cold brew in a shaker with ice. Pour into 2.5 oz. shot glass and top with whipped cream, cinnamon, and a caramel drizzle.

Nightmare
courtesy of Cakewolf.com
1 part absinthe
1 part coffee flavored liqueur
1 part crème de cacao

Build in a mug and top with strong coffee.

Brockmans Black and Gold
courtesy of Brockmans Gin
2 oz. Brockmans Gin
1/2 oz. Drambuie
1 oz. lemon juice
.75 oz. honey and heather syrup
2.5 oz. pineapple juice
3 drops of black food coloring
gold edible glitter

Shake all liquid ingredients and serve over cubed ice in a Hurricane Glass. Apply one spray of edible gold glitter to the top half of the glass to stand out against the black food coloring. Garnish with a lemon wedge fan.

Caramel Pumpkin Monkey Bread

Pumpkin Caramel Monkey Bread
courtesy of Pillsbury.com
½ cup granulated sugar
2 Tbsp. pumpkin pie spice
4 cans (16.3 oz. each) Pillsbury Grands! Flaky Layers refrigerated Original biscuits
1 cup packed brown sugar
¾ cup butter
¼ cup canned pumpkin (not pumpkin pie mix)

Heat oven to 350°F. Spray 6-cup (9-inch) fluted tube cake pan or angel food (tube) cake pan with cooking spray.

In large food-storage plastic bag, mix granulated sugar and pumpkin pie spice. Separate each can of dough into 8 biscuits; cut each biscuit into quarters. Place 6 to 8 biscuit pieces in sugar-spice mixture; shake well. Continue to add more biscuit pieces to sugar-spice mixture until all are completely coated. Place biscuit pieces in pan.

In 1-quart saucepan, melt butter, brown sugar and pumpkin over medium heat. (We added a tablespoon of brandy.) When mixture begins to boil, cook and stir 1 minute. Pour over biscuits in pan.

Bake 35 minutes or until golden brown. Cool in pan 10 minutes. Place plate upside down over pan; turn plate and pan over. Remove pan. Serve warm. This is great with a scoop of vanilla ice cream on top!

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