Review: Jim Beam Distiller’s Cut

Jim Beam never seems to get tired of putting out new products. Jim Beam Distiller’s Cut (not to be confused with Jim Beam Distiller’s Masterpiece, Jim Beam Distillers Series, or Jim Beam Devil’s Cut) is a new, limited-edition bourbon that actually does carry an age statement of “5-6 years” and, while it’s not bonded, it’s bottled at 50% abv. There’s a weird emphasis here on the fact that this is not chill-filtered… but let’s let Fred Noe do some of the talking now:

Distiller’s Cut is a limited time offering that was personally selected by Fred Noe, Jim Beam’s seventh generation Master Distiller, and is available nationwide.

“We skipped the chill filtration process, so the liquid gets from barrel to bottle a little differently,” said Noe. “The result is unique to other Jim Beam offerings, with a fuller taste and longer finish compared to your typical bourbon.”

Jim Beam Distiller’s Cut is a Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey aged five to six years that features a medium body and combines caramel sweetness with charred oak, enriched with light fruit notes. The premium expression offers a smooth and complex mouthfeel with a warm, lightly charred oak finish – the perfect gift for a bourbon lover looking to try something different this holiday season. It has a dark amber color with aromas of soft charred oak, sweet caramel, vanilla and hints of dried fruit.

“At Jim Beam, we are consistently innovating to offer our consumers a wide range of products. Jim Beam Distiller’s Cut is different from our other products because of the post-aging process,” said Rob Mason, Vice President of North American Whiskey at Beam Suntory. “Our Master Distiller has decided to release this batch at a time when bourbon drinkers, more than ever, are anxious to discover something unique.”

After aging, bourbon typically goes through a chill filtration process, which involves forcing the liquid through a dense filter to remove fatty acids formed during distillation. Jim Beam Distiller’s Cut skips this step, which results in a fuller taste and palate feel. This can also cause the liquid to look cloudier compared to filtered bourbons, especially on the rocks.

This is a solid product from Beam, bold on the nose with classic bourbon notes — caramel corn, vanilla, toffee, and ample baking spice. Peppery and a bit gritty at times, the bourbon’s heat is amplified by the alcohol level, giving it a punchiness and raciness that one wouldn’t typically expect from an otherwise fairly mainstream product. The palate is just as much fun, a bold bourbon with a slightly salty but corny punch, elevated by notes of cinnamon red hots, cola, chocolate sauce, and nutmeg. The finish is warming (thanks in part again to that 50% abv) and lush, mouth-filling and robust — everything an everyday bourbon should be.

Best of all, this is a whiskey that barely costs $20 a bottle. As values in the whiskey space become increasingly hard to come by, Beam is doing you a solid that you would be an utter fool to pass up. You heard it here first.

100 proof.

A / $23 / jimbeam.com

Review: Chicken Cock Straight Bourbon 8 Years Old

Listen, I came to Chicken Cock via its 2013 flavored whiskeys, which came packaged in aluminum cans. The brand is an ancient one dating to the 1850s — because otherwise no one is putting “cock” on their labels — but the whiskey being put out today really has no relationship to the old stuff. The original Chicken Cock went out of business in the 1950s.

Nonetheless, Chicken Cock Whiskey is celebrating the 160th anniversary of the brand with this, a limited edition, single barrel, eight year old bourbon (with a real age statement). Did I have high expectations based on those weird flavored whiskeys? I did not. But let’s keep an open mind, OK?

For starters, this is much different stuff. Sourced spirit from MGP, it’s straight bourbon, single barrel mind you, made from a mash of 70% corn, 21% rye and 9% malted barley, “and bottled in a replica of the pre-prohibition original Chicken Cock bottle.”

Damn, this is good stuff! Very good stuff. Sure, it’s 8 year old MGP, with a solid mashbill, so it’s hard to go wrong, but Chicken Cock has — at the very least — cherry-picked some amazing barrels.

The nose is seductive. Mildly woody, a little bit of popcorn, a hint of vanilla-laced toasted marshmallow, and a lacing of herbs… there’s a lot going on but it’s all in perfect harmony. The palate is somehow even better. It starts of quietly, with a standard caramel corn character, before jumping an octave and showcasing a whole new set of flavors. Lots of cinnamon, eucalyptus, and a ton of gingerbread all punch the palate, hard — all muddled up with notes of dried apple, more caramel corn, and a vanilla soda note. The finish sees all of these things melding into a cohesive, almost Christmaslike whole, with a lingering allspice note on the finish.

It’s rare that I find a bourbon hard to put down these days, but this is a killer that fits the description… despite the price tag.

90 proof. Reviewed: Barrel #5.

A / $100 / chickencockwhiskey.com

Review: Old Elk Blended Straight Bourbon Whiskey

Crafted in Fort Collins, Colorado, by former MGP master distiller Greg Metze, Old Elk is a different kind of bourbon right out of the gate. “Blended” is a curious term to see on a whiskey label these days, and I’ll let Metze and crew explain what that means here:

We use traditional ingredients – malted barley, corn and rye – in an innovative, yet steadfast recipe to create a bourbon with smooth, rich flavors that act in harmony with caramel cues brought out by the charred barrels and spicy rye notes,” said Greg Metze, Master Distiller at Old Elk Distillery. “After testing a variety of proofing periods, we found that these flavors come together in a smoother bourbon when the proofing stages are longer. Instead of taking the usual 24 to 48 hours for proofing, we use a slow cut proofing process during which full-barrel proof bourbon is cut and left to rest – and we repeat this patient technique until the ideal character is achieved. It takes significantly longer than most common recipes, but taking the time to proof slowly makes all the difference.

Also of note, the mashbill for Old Elk is 51% corn, 34% malted barley, and 15% rye. That’s a wacky mash with a ton more barley than is typical for bourbon — and is responsible for the “innovative, yet steadfast recipe” to which Metze is referring.

Let’s give it a go.

This is a solid bourbon, through and through. Gingerbread notes are heavy on the nose, with spicy rye notes, caramel corn, marzipan, and a hint of cherry peeking through. On the palate the whiskey is round and soothing, with notes of brown butter, caramel sauce, and again a hint of that cherry fruit making an appearance. More almond and wood notes make a stronger appearance as the finish develops, which comes together as a slightly raspy character with notes of toasty wood, barrel char, and a heavier corny note. They’re all classic hallmarks of bourbon, to be sure, but nonetheless take the experience a bit too far to the savory side. Otherwise, it’s a unique bourbon — but not one that is so crazy as to throw you off — that is firing on all cylinders.

Pick up a bottle.

88 proof.

A- / $50 / oldelk.com

Drinkhacker Asks: Wild Turkey’s Jimmy Russell

Like most discerning drinkers, we here at Drinkhacker have many questions we’d like to ask the people behind our favorite wine, beer, or spirit. Every now and then, we get the opportunity to actually do so. For the first in our series of short interviews, we talked to the “the Buddha of Bourbon” himself and the longest-tenured active Master Distiller in the spirits world, Wild Turkey Master Distiller Jimmy Russell.

We interviewed Jimmy at the Wild Turkey Visitor Center in Lawrenceburg, Kentucky where you’ll often find him (when he’s not traveling the world) sitting on his stool, happy to talk to any of the thousands of visitors that come through Wild Turkey’s doors every year.

Drinkhacker: Thanks for taking the time, Jimmy. We know you’re a pretty busy man for 82 years young. Let’s get right to it. Any fun whiskeys you’ve been working on lately?

Jimmy Russell: In October, I went out to Virginia to help make a special rye whiskey for the 10th anniversary of the reconstruction of George Washington’s Distillery at Mount Vernon. A whole bunch of us form Kentucky and other places got together on it.

I know you prefer bourbon over rye. How’s it taste?

JR: It was pretty good. It’s got a good amount of corn in it like our Russell’s Reserve Rye, so I like it.

So you were in Virginia not that long ago, and you leave for WhiskyFest in New York City tomorrow. You travel a lot. I hope you’re flying First Class or at least getting some Wild Turkey on the plane!

JR: You know the only airline that carries Wild Turkey is Southwest, and they don’t fly out of Lexington. I’m good friends with the founder, Herb Kelleher, and I keep trying to get him to come out here. He’s a great guy. You know, for Herb’s 65th birthday we printed his face on 65 bottles of Wild Turkey bourbon. He got a kick out of it.

If he’s a Wild Turkey fan, you must be a great friend to have. I’m surprised he didn’t build you a personal runway next to the Visitor’s Center! With all that travel, what’s the furthest you’ve flown for an event?

JR: We go all the way to Japan. The Japanese love bourbon. And their whiskey festivals last two days and start at 10 AM!

Sounds like we’re doing it all wrong in the states! You used to do a lot of festivals with Heaven Hill’s Master Distiller, Parker Beam, who passed away earlier this year. I know you two were very close. Any stories or memories you’d like to share about Parker?

JR: Yeah. Parker and I were close. You know he didn’t know he had ALS (Lou Gehrig’s disease) until he was about 70. And even when he got diagnosed he didn’t want to slow down. He especially loved driving, and he’d get somebody to ride with him and shift gears for him when he couldn’t do it anymore!

Sounds like he was quite a character. And definitely a legend in the bourbon world.

JR: Yeah. It used to be me, and Parker, and Booker Noe, and Elmer T. Lee, and now I’m the only one left.

And it doesn’t look like you’re slowing down any time soon! But the business has really become a family affair for many distilleries. You’ve got your son Eddie sharing Master Distiller responsibilities with you. How about your grandchildren? Are they planning to get into the business?

JR: Oh yeah. My grandson has been getting experience with all the different parts of the distillery. He’ll be with me and Eddie at WhiskyFest in New York, and my granddaughter who works here in the Visitor’s Center will be with us, too.

Well, it sounds like the future of Wild Turkey is in good hands. Now we just need to get 101 on more airline drink menus!

JR: Ha. Yeah, that’d be nice.

wildturkeybourbon.com

Review: A. Smith Bowman Isaac Bowman Port-Barrel Finished Bourbon

Virginia’s A. Smith Bowman seems to have no shortage of relatives under whom it can bottle whiskey. Abraham, John, “Bowman Brothers”… they all have spirits made in their honor. Now it’s Isaac’s turn, with a bourbon finished in Port casks.

Officially known as Isaac Bowman Straight Bourbon Whiskey Finished in Port Barrels, this is a NAS bourbon (the same base spirit used in its core line) that spends between three to six months in Port-style casks brought in from Portugal and “from across Virginia.” The finishing time is dependent on the particular cask.

The whiskey joins a prior Port-finished bottling (though quite a bit different in production) that was released under the Abraham Bowman line and which hit the market in 2013.

Let’s give this new expression a shot.

The nose is quite a delight, chocolatey and raisin-heavy, without the dominating wood profile of the 2013 Abraham Bowman bottling referenced above. The traditional popcorn notes of bourbon take on more of a caramel corn character, with some mint overtones evident. The palate is largely in line with what’s come before the mint and chocolate really taking the full focus of the experience, with a melange of character picking up on the back end — cloves, honey, and an amaro-like bitterness that takes the finish into a surprising (and welcome) slightly brooding territory.

Fun stuff, and at just $40 a bottle, it’s an excellent value worth picking up immediately.

92 proof.

A / $40 / asmithbowman.com

Drinkhacker’s 2017 Holiday Gift Guide – Best Alcohol/Spirits for Christmas

It’s our tenth anniversary, and our tenth holiday gift guide!

After more than 5500 posts — the bulk of them product reviews — we’ve written millions of words on all things quaffable, and as always, we select the cream of the crop to highlight in our annual holiday buying guide. Consider it a “best of the year,” if you’d like — though we do try to aim the list toward products that are actually attainable (sorry, Van Winkle family!) by the average Joe.

As always, the selections below are not comprehensive but represent some of our absolute favorite products. Got a different opinion or think we’re full of it? Feel free to let us know in the comments with your own suggestions for alternatives or questions about other categories or types of beverages that might be perfect for gifting. None of these sound any good to you? Not enough scratch? Teetotaling it in 2018? May we suggest a Drinkhacker t-shirt instead?

Again, happy holidays to all of you who have helped to make Drinkhacker one of the most popular wine and spirits websites on the Internet! Here’s to the next 10 years of kick-ass drinks reviews!

And don’t forget, for more top gift ideas check out the archives and read our 20162015201420132012201120102009, and 2008 holiday guides.

Bourbon – Four Roses Limited Edition Small Batch Bourbon 2017 “Al Young 50th Anniversary” ($500) – I’m not the only one to have fallen in love with Four Roses’ one-off Small Batch bottling, which was made in honor of longtime employee Al Young and his 50 years on the job. While this exquisite small batch hit the market at $150, you’re more likely to find it at triple the cost… which means you can expect triple the thank yous should you buy one for a loved one. If that’s not in the cards, check out this year’s Parker’s Heritage Collection Single Barrel Bourbon 11 Years Old ($300+), A. Smith Bowman Abraham Bowman Sequential Series Bourbon ($40/375ml – hard to find), Wyoming Whiskey Double Cask Limited Edition ($55), or Hirsch High Rye Straight Bourbon Whiskey 8 Years Old ($40). All of these will make for unusual, but highly loved, gifts.

Scotch – Kilchoman Red Wine Cask Matured ($110) – So much good Scotch hit this year that it’s hard to pick a favorite, but for 2017 I simply have to go with the magical combination of Islay peat and red wine casks that Kilchoman just released. It’s an absolute steal at this price; buy one for your best bud and one for yourself, too. Of the many other top bottlings to consider, the ones you should be able to actually find include: Caol Ila Unpeated 18 Years Old Limited Edition 2017 ($100), The Balvenie Peat Week 14 Years Old 2002 Vintage ($93), Bunnahabhain 13 Years Old Marsala Finish ($80), and Glenmorangie Bacalta ($89).

Other Whiskey – Kavalan Amontillado Sherry Cask Single Malt Whisky ($400) – I’m not thrilled about dropping another multi-hundred dollar whiskey in this list, but Kavalan hit it out of the park with its finished single malts, the top of the line being this Amontillado-casked number, which is as dark as coffee in the glass. Also consider The Tyrconnell Single Malt Irish Whiskey 16 Years Old ($70), Amrut Spectrum 004 Single Malt Whisky ($500, apologies again), and the outlandish Lost Spirits Distillery Abomination “The Sayers of the Law” ($50, but good luck).

Gin – Cadee Distillery Intrigue Gin ($36) – It’s been a lighter year for gin, but Washington-based Cadee’s combination of flavors in Intrigue are amazing. A close second goes to Eden Mill’s Original Gin ($40), which hails from Scotland.

Vodka – Stateside Urbancraft Vodka ($30) Philadelphia-born Stateside Urbancraft Vodka was the only new vodka we gave exceptional marks to this year. Is the category finally on the decline?

Rum – Havana Club Tributo 2017 ($160) – As Cuban rum finds its way to the U.S., your options for finding top-quality sugar-based spirits are better than ever. Start your collection with Havana Club’s Tributo 2017, which you can now find for much less than the original $390 asking price. More mainstream options: Mezan Single Distillery Rum Panama 2006 ($43), Maggie’s Farm La Revuelta Dark Rum ($35), Cooper River Petty’s Island Driftwood Dream Spiced Rum ($32), or, for those with deep pockets, Arome True Rum 28 Years Old ($600).

Brandy – Domaines Hine Bonneuil 2006 Cognac ($140) – Hine’s 2006 vintage Cognac drinks well above its age and is just about perfect, a stellar brandy that any fan of the spirit will absolutely enjoy. Bache-Gabrielsen XO Decanter Cognac ($100) makes for a striking gift as well, given its lavish presentation and decanter.

Tequila – Patron Extra Anejo Tequila ($90) – No contest here. Patron’s first permanent extra anejo addition to the lineup hits all the right notes, and it’s surprisingly affordable in a world where other extras run $200 and up. Siembra Valles Ancestral Tequila Blanco ($120) is actually more expensive despite being a blanco, but its depth of flavor is something unlike any other tequila I’ve ever encountered.

Liqueur – Luxardo Bitter Bianco ($28) – Who says amaro has to be dark brown in color? Luxardo’s latest is as bitter as anything, but it’s nearly clear, making it far more versatile in cocktails (and not so rough on your teeth). I love it. For a much different angle, check out Songbird Craft Coffee Liqueur ($25), a sweet coffee liqueur that’s hard not to love.

Wine  A bottle of wine never goes unappreciated. Here is a selection of our top picks from 2017:

Need another custom gift idea (or have a different budget)? Drop us a line or leave a comment here and we’ll offer our best advice!

Looking to buy any of the above? Give Caskers and Master of Malt a try!

Review: Black Feather Bourbon


Black Feather American Bourbon Whiskey comes across a lot like a microdistilled whiskey, but it’s actually a blend of two MGP allotments, bourbons made from a mash of 70% corn, 21% rye, and 9% malted barley. Bottled in Houston, Texas (go Astros!), bottles are individually numbered, including a batch number.

Again, I was stunned to find this was MGP juice — and while there’s no age statement on the bottle, my presumption is it’s very young. It kicks off with ample wood on the nose, a barnburner that finds a companion in some burly spices — lots of cloves, some spearmint, and torched sugar notes.

The palate follows largely in line with the above, though here the wood is even more blatant, more overpowering, and less well-integrated into the whole. That pungent woodiness lingers amidst some secondary cereal notes that linger for quite a while, plus a finish that returns to the mint character while hinting at orange peel and more of that baking spice.

On the whole, this is a nice effort at a frontier-style whiskey, but it clearly needs more time in barrel (or perhaps a lower level of char) to round out some rough edges and better integrate its flavors.

86 proof. Reviewed: Batch #1.

B / $26 / blackfeatherwhiskey.com

-->