Recipes: Cocktails for July 4th, 2017

Margarita Watermelon

Independence Day is upon us. We know you plan to celebrate, so we’ve got cocktails for you: Two of them make large batches, which makes them perfect for a fireworks viewing party. To finish up, we have recipes for boozy watermelon and then a favorite American dish — corn pudding. Both are easy and will go great with whatever you are cooking up on the grill.

We want you to have plenty of great beverages — but of course we encourage you to be safe when driving… or when handling those firecrackers.

Jacked SangriaJacked Sangria
courtesy of Alcomar restaurant, Austin, TX
8 oz. Jack Daniel’s
3 oz. Créme de Cassis
2 cups fresh mango puree
2 750 ml bottles of cabernet
6 oz. hand-squeezed lime juice
32 oz. Sprite

Combine all ingredients in a pitcher with ice. Serve and enjoy! This makes a gallon so you will have plenty to share around.

Dixie Daly
2 oz. Dixie Citrus Vodka
2 oz. sweet tea
2 oz. lemonade
4 mint leaves
sparkling soda
juice of 1/4 lemon
1 dash of Angostura bitters

Shake all ingredients except the soda with ice; pour in ice-filled glass. Top with soda and serve. If desired, also garnish with mint leaves.

The Red Planet NegroniRed Planet Negroni
created by Leo Robitschek, The NoMad (NYC)
1 oz. Campari
1 1/2 oz. Cinzano 1757
2 oz. Bulldog Gin
clarified milk mixture (see below)

Follow instructions below to create clarified milk punch. Serve in a rocks glass filled with ice. Garnish with two star-shaped orange twists.

To make clarified milk mixture:
3 oz. milk
1 oz. lemon juice
1 1/2 oz. spice rooibos tea syrup
1 1/2 oz. pineapple juice

Heat up milk until just under a simmer. Take the pot off the heat and add the lemon juice. Stir slowly until the curds and the whey separate. Add the remaining ingredients and mix. Pour all of the ingredients slowly through a superbag or nut bag until the punch becomes clear, and the repeat the filtering process.

The Curious BlueCurious Blue
1 ¾ oz. Brockmans Gin
½ oz. blueberry liqueur
½ oz. lemon juice
2 oz. blueberry puree
ginger beer

Shake all ingredients but the ginger beer with ice. Strain into a tall Collins glass filled with ice.

Rose and Strawberry Vino
1 1/2 oz. Barefoot Summer red wine
1 oz. strawberry vodka
rose basil seed drink
2 ice cubes
rose petals to garnish

Mix wine and vodka in a glass, stir; then pour into a cocktail glass over 2 ice cubes. Top; off with rose basil seed drink. Garnish with rose petals and serve.

Belle of the (Summer) BallBelle of the Ballk
courtesy of NYC-based mixologist Jaime Rios
1 1/2 oz. Belle de Brillet Liqueur
1 oz. light rum
3/4 oz. lime juice
3 raspberries
club soda
sprig of rosemary

Add raspberries, ice, and alcohol ingredients into a shaker. Shake and strain into a highball with fresh ice. Top with club soda. Garnish with a rosemary sprig.

The Marked Man
courtesy of Kegworks
2½ oz. blueberry-infused bourbon
½ oz. dry vermouth
½ oz. Benedictine
2 dashes peach bitters
3 fresh blueberries, for garnish

Fill a mixing glass ¾ of the way with ice and add infused bourbon, vermouth, Benedictine, and bitters. Stir well, until cold. Strain into a chilled cocktail glass and garnish with 3 blueberries skewered onto a cocktail pick. Enjoy!

To infuse bourbon:
There are several variations of this…adding lemon, vanilla, ginger, or blueberry tea. We’re giving you the simplest method so you can tailor it to your own tastes.
1 liter bourbon
1 ½ pints fresh blueberries
¼ cup honey

Put all ingredients in a blender and pulse. Then pour everything into a sterile jar (wash well and then boil in water to sterilize the jar and lid). Let sit in a cool place for three days. Fine strain with cheese cloth or a nut bag. It should keep for a few weeks.

The Gimme
courtesy STICKS Bar & Grill at The Inn at Spanish Bay, Pebble Beach Resorts
2 oz. Absolut vodka
1 oz. fresh lime juice
1 oz. blueberry agave syrup
3 oz. ginger beer
1 oz. club soda
4 blueberries for garnish
1 mint sprig for garnish

Add vodka, blueberry agave nectar, fresh lime, and ice to a 16-oz. glass. Stir to incorporate and chill. Add ginger beer and club soda, then stir again–this time, make sure to bring the bottom of the glass contents up through the carbonated mixers. Garnish with blueberries. Remove the lower mint leaves from stem. Bruise mint sprig to allow the mint oils and aromatics to be expressed. Add as garnish.

Blueberry agave syrup:
6 oz. fresh blueberries
1 oz. granulated white sugar
juice of ½ lemon
2 oz. water
6 oz. agave nectar

In a small sauce pan, combine all ingredients, except agave, and heat on medium low until the blueberries start to soften. Remove from heat and place in blender. Add agave nectar and blend until mixture is thoroughly incorporated in agave nectar.

Samuel Adams Summer Ale SangriaSam Adams Sangria
4¼ bottles Samuel Adams Summer Ale
2 bottles of light white wine, like a sweet Riesling
2 oz. soda water
½ cup of cognac
½ cup of apple schnapps
½ cup of simple syrup
2 honeydew melons, peeled, sliced and diced (we used a melon baller tool)
4 oranges, cut in to wheels

Mix all ingredients except soda water together in a large bowl, and refrigerate overnight. Add 2 oz. of soda water, and serve. Serves approximately 40 three-ounce servings.

This next recipe isn’t a cocktail per se, but fitting nonetheless.

Margarita-Soaked Watermelon Slices
courtesy of Divas Can Cook
1 small seedless watermelon
1 cup sugar
¾ cup boiling water
¼ cup lime juice
½ cup Hornitos Reposado Tequila
¼ cup Cointreau/triple sec
lime slices from 6 limes
¼ cup margarita salt

Slice watermelon into small triangles and arrange them on a large cookie sheet in a single layer. In a medium size bowl add sugar and boiling water. Stir until sugar has dissolved and let cool. Add in lime juice, tequila, and Cointreau. Spoon mixture over each watermelon slice and then pour on what’s left. Cover and refrigerate for 12-24 hours—no longer than that or your watermelon will get rubbery. Serve slices cold on a platter with lime slices and a dish of margarita salt.

Many Americans consider corn one of our most important crops with its uses in spirits production, corn syrup, as a vegetable, and a grain. It’s only fitting that we share this corn pudding recipe with you. It is common in the Midwest, but we’re giving you a southwestern version. It’s great with any barbecue or to take to a pot luck. You can make the creamed corn from scratch; then roast, peel, and chop the green chiles by hand if you have the time and inclination. We’re going for a quick dish so are using the canned versions in this recipe. Trust us, it’s belly-pleasing either way.

Corn PuddingCorn Pudding
1 (15 ounce) can creamed corn
1 can of evaporated milk
¼ butter softened
½ cup chopped yellow onion
½ cup shredded cheddar cheese
1 can Ortega chopped green chiles
1 tsp each salt and pepper
2 Tbsp flour
2 tsp baking soda
3 eggs

Butter a casserole dish. Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

Mix well all ingredients, including the remaining butter; then pour into the casserole dish. Bake uncovered approximately 30 minutes. You can top with more shredded cheese or bread crumbs if desired.

Bar Review: Teleféric Barcelona Restaurant, Walnut Creek, California

Teleféric Barcelona
Teleféric has three bars/restaurants in Spain. The one we visited in Walnut Creek, California is their first venture in the United States, having opened in January 2017. Their menu is filled with dishes from Barcelona, created by chefs from Spain. The pricing is a bit high, but worth it for a special luxury meal such as an anniversary or birthday dinner. What first drew our attention to this restaurant is a peek at their signature sangrias. They graciously gave us a recipe to share with you.

Everything done at Teleféric Barcelona is done with flair, from the friendly and talkative staff to elaborate garnishes on food and drink abound. First we were offered appetizers from a cart. In Spain they are called pinchos, meaning ‘little bites.’ The best of these was a chorizo bite. It was sweet and paired with a nice crema-like cheese and a pepper which we expected to be hot but was pleasant instead.

Pisco cart

To go with our pinchos, drinks were in order. First up was a cocktail called a Cortez, Teleféric’s version of a Manhattan. It was surprising to find mezcal in it because we typically think of that with more Mexican dishes. The signature smokiness was there but not overwhelming. Other ingredients included Carpano Antica, maraschino liqueur, and flaming sweet orange. Very nice.

We also had a cocktail served alongside dessert called In Spanish Fashion. Its ingredients include Bulleit Rye whiskey, brandy, sweet vermouth, Benedictine, bitters, lemon, and hand cut ice. This was a pleasant combination of ingredients and a great end to a wonderful evening.

But sangria is really the main event here: Our host explained how every region of Spain has their own signature style of sangria. We decided to try Teleféric’s three sangrias with our meal. They were kind enough to bring us small tastes so we could try them all.

First was the white sangria called Sangria Ibiza. Its light bubbly and mild dry taste came from Verdejo Wine and Pisco from Peru. The slight sweetness is from the addition of elderflower liqueur, Licor 43, peaches, and pineapples.

Next up: A pink sangria called Barceloneta. Among its ingredients are prickly pear juice, lemonade, and a jumble of fresh fruits such as orange, blueberry, and raspberry. It came garnished with a small sprig of rosemary. Its taste was reminiscent of a Grenache wine.

The third, and our favorite, sangria was the Sangria Teleféric. Right off the mint from the garnish tickles the nose. This sangria was also garnished with a cinnamon stick, blueberries, and raspberries. The cinnamon gave the drink a nice spiciness to it.

We wanted to make it ourselves — here’s the recipe:Signature Sangrias

Sangria Teleféric
Spanish red wine
orange juice
apple juice
4 oranges (chunks)
4 ripe pears (chunks)
4 big cinnamon sticks
Brandy de Jerez “Solera”
Nolet’s gin

There aren’t measurements because you can make these in large or small batches and mix everything to taste. Mix all these ingredients , except the red wine. Then cover and refrigerate for 24 hours. The purpose is to obtain a balanced and unique flavor so neither the gin nor brandy will be overpowering. Throughout these 24 hours the pears and oranges release their flavors enhancing the fruity, but not too sweet flavors. Once the mix is ready, combine it with red wine. Let it rest for another 24 hours so the wine can absorb the sweetness and flavor of the fruits. Garnish with a cinnamon stick, berries, and fresh mint sprig.

telefericbarcelona.com

Cupping Coffee with Intelligentsia

Intelligencia Coffee
There is no scent warmer and more inviting than that of coffee beans roasting. The moment we stepped through Intelligentsia’s front door, all traffic woes were forgotten in favor of a good mood. We knew the afternoon would only get better. We walked past huge bags of newly roasted coffee beans and paused a moment before an enormous roasting machine with its large paddles for stirring the beans as they roast.

Large roaster machineHave you ever experienced cupping coffee? During our visit to Intelligentsia Coffee’s San Francisco facility, we learned how to perform this delightful ritual used by coffee roasters to determine the quality of their newly roasted coffee beans. There are elements each bean is rated upon with regards to types of aromas and initial flavor profiles. We discovered that each roaster has their own proprietary checklist they work from.

Cupping coffee — a tasting system that involves a significant amount of protocol — isn’t quick and there’s a specific way to sip the coffee from the spoon. Loud slurp noises are acceptable! However, it is worth the time because fine beverages meant to be savored — including coffee.

For cupping, the first thing you do is lean over the cup to take in the aromas. You can use your hand to wave the scents toward your face. Aromas range from floral to leguminous; the goal is to identify additional scents, such as botanicals, floral, or citrus.

Next you sip the coffee and determine the following factors:

  • Taste – There are sixteen types of taste descriptors, ranging from acrid to delicate; then from soft to creosol. Elements like saltiness and bitterness levels are notated on a checklist.
  • Sweetness – How prevalent or how missing sweet notes are present in the brew. The type of sweetness can vary as well; honey-like or sugary or syrupy if overdone.
  • Acidity – Varying types of acidity can enhance a coffee’s flavor or add to bitterness. Acidity ranges from lactic to acerbic with the harshest being kerosene like.
  • Complexity – Complexity involves the balance of the flavors present in a cup and whether elements in the flavor profile complement one another or compete, creating odd or negative tastes.
  • Aftertaste – This is typically used to describe negative tastes at the end of a beverage. While it is often a sign of something wrong with the bean or during the roasting, it can be a pleasant association as well.

A Coffee Taster’s Flavor Wheel put out by the Specialty Coffee Association shows all the common elements to look for.

Our host, Mark Cunningham explained how any coffee is at its finest during the cupping and that it will never be better than at that moment. He told us that a good coffee will still taste good after it’s gone cold, but lesser quality coffees get bitter and harsh.

Our cupping completed, we came back to our coffee after touring the roasting floor to discover the truth in his statement. The cups of varying roasts tasted just as amazing as when we first sipped from the spoon. The big chain coffees’ burnt-tasting dark roasts are no longer palpable. Strong doesn’t need to be bitter or charred; in fact, it is much better when it isn’t.

Cupping RitualIntelligentsia also offers a variety of artisan teas called tisanes. We sampled two of them at the cupping. Both were wonderful blends of tea, spices, and botanicals such as cardamom, rose hips, and turmeric. They are expanding in the tea area by continuing to produce new blends.

Just how does Intelligentsia obtain their high quality coffees? By working with small, family owned coffee bean farmers around the world. Their buyers are very hands-on in their search for the best beans to purchase, taking the time necessary to visit the farms and sample the raw product. With the climate and soil compositions determining the flavors of the coffee after roasting, this is an important step. It makes sense when you realize that beans mature at different times of the year, depending upon where in the world the plants are growing. One thing Intelligentsia insists on are beans properly matured on the plant before harvesting. We liken that to the taste difference between garden grown tomatoes and those picked early and expected to ripen on the way to the grocery store. Most fruits and vegetables stop ripening once harvested so their flavors aren’t robust as those garden grown. Coffee beans wouldn’t be any different.

Just recently opened to the public (previously their clients were bars and restaurants), Intelligentsia has red coffee trucks which make appearances around town in San Francisco, Chicago, Los Angeles, and New York. Follow them on Twitter to find out where you can catch them. They also recently opened a monthly coffee subscription service. Additionally, Intelligentsia offers classes on brewing for barista training.

In closing, we learned that Two Sisters Bar and Books in San Francisco created a couple of cocktails featuring Intelligentsia coffee. They were kind enough to share those recipes with us. We made them with the Intelligentsia coffees and found them both to be amazing cocktails. Give them a try and let us know what you think.

The Bluegrass BuzzThe Bluegrass Buzz
created by Mikha Diaz for Two Sisters Bar and Books
3 oz. Intelligensia Cold Brew from cold brew concentrate (diluted at a 6:1 ratio)
1 1/2 oz. Old Forester 86 bourbon
1/2 oz. brown sugar simple syrup (equal parts brown sugar, gently packed, and boiling water; stir to combine)
lightly whipped heavy cream

Combine cold brew, bourbon and brown sugar simple syrup in a small tin or pint glass. Fill with ice and shake. Strain into a small rocks glass. Top with 2-3 tablespoons of lightly whipped cream.

The Sharp Shooter
created by Kathryn Kulczyk for Two Sisters Bar and Books
1 1/2 oz. Cold Brew Cognac (4 oz. El Diablo blend, ground for cone drip filter, infused into 750 ml. Maison Rouge 100 proof cognac)
3/4 oz. Ancho Reyes liqueur
1/2 oz. Carpano Antica vermouth
3 hard dashes Fee Brothers Aztec Chocolate Bitters

Combine cognac, liqueur, and vermouth in a small tin or pint glass. Fill with ice and shake. Strain into a small rocks glass. Top with three whole coffee beans.

intelligentsiacoffee.com

Recipes for National Tartan Day 2017

Highland Fling

Today, April 6, is National Tartan Day, which began in 1998 to celebrate people of Scottish and Scottish-Irish roots. With over 11 million members, the Scots are the eighth largest ethnic group in America. Rob Roys, Rusty Nails, and Drambuie Collins may be the go-to cocktails when thinking of Scottish cocktails — but try out these wonderful recipes instead. As a bonus, you know we had to include a traditional Scottish stew and a couple of wonderful desserts to round out this occasion.

Royal HighlanderRoyal Highlander
created by Glenfiddich Ambassador Allan Roth
2 parts Glenfiddich 12 Years Old
½ part sweet vermouth
½ part Cocchi Americano
1/2 oz. Benedictine
sparkling wine

Pour ½ ounce of Benedictine in a coupe; swirl and discard. Add the remaining ingredients, except the sparkling wine, to a mixing glass and stir with ice. Strain into the Benedictine rinsed coupe. Top with approximately an ounce of sparkling wine.

The Highland Fling
created by Hendrick’s Ambassador, Mattias Horseman
1 ½ parts Hendrick’s gin
1 ½ parts gunpowder green tea
¾ part small batch whiskey
½ part lime juice
½ part simple syrup

Muddle, shake, and strain all ingredients into a hurricane glass. Top with soda. Garnish with a cucumber and grated black pepper.

Tam O’ ShanterTam O Shanter
courtesy of GlasgowGuide.co.uk
3 parts whiskey
2 parts French vermouth
3 parts orange juice

Shake well, add a little nutmeg and serve with an olive.

The Catholic Guilt
Courtesy of Blackbook.com
2 oz. Black Grouse blended whisky
¾ oz. ginger syrup
¾ oz. lemon juice
dash orange bitters
dash fig bitters
Fernet Branca
lemon or orange twist

Shake the all ingredients except the Fernet Branca with ice. Next, strain into an ice-filled rocks glass and float the Fernet Branca on top. Garnish with a lemon or orange twist and serve.

Laphroaig Plaid and Peated
courtesy of SusiedrinksDallas.com
1 part Laphroaig Quarter Cask single malt scotch whiskey
1/2 part dry vermouth
1/2 part Cynar
1/2 part elderflower liqueur

Combine all ingredients in mixing glass with ice. Stir well and strain into a chilled cocktail glass.

The BrambleBramble
courtesy of bartender Ciarán Russell
1 ½ oz. dry gin
juice of one lemon
1 oz. simple syrup
blackberry liqueur crème de mure (or cream de cassis)

Build over a mound of crushed ice before blackberry liqueur crème de mure is trickled down the ice as a final touch. It is said to resemble that of a bramble bush, from where the cocktail is thought to have attained its name. (We used an absinthe glass, which is why the crème de mure gathered in the bottom reservoir.)

These next three recipes are from rampantscotland.com

Suitor
1/2 oz. Drambuie
1 oz. orange liqueur (such as Gran Marnier)
1 oz. Bailey’s Irish cream
2/3 oz. milk

Pour in order into a rocks glass and serve.

Umbrella Man Special
2 oz. vodka
2 oz. Kahlua
2 oz. Bailey’s Irish cream
2 oz. Grand Marnier
2 oz. DrambuieWarm Wooly Sheep

Mix all ingredients in a shaker. Serve with straw and ice cubes and put a cocktail umbrella beside the straw in the glass.

Don’t think warm milk is for old geezers. They just might have this one in their mug!

Warm Woolly Sheep
1 oz. Scotch whisky
1 1/2 oz. Drambuie
warm milk

Mix scotch and Drambuie. Top with warm milk; settle back and enjoy.

These two desserts are traditional Scottish recipes from rampantscotland.com

Dornoch Dreams BunsDornoch Dreams Buns
2 oz. butter
1 cup flour
6 oz. water
3 eggs
12 oz. raspberries (whole or lightly crushed—we used a package of frozen raspberries)
4 oz. honey
2 Tbsp. Drambuie
1/2 pint heavy cream
confectioners’ sugar for decoration

Place the butter and water in a saucepan and heat until the butter has melted. Remove from the heat and stir in the flour. Beat until the mixture forms a ball and leaves the edges of the pan cleanly. Beat the eggs and slowly add them, a little at a time, beating well between each addition.

Spoon the pastry mixture into a large piping bag with a plain nozzle and pipe 12 round cakes onto a lightly greased baking sheet. We used muffin tins in ours. Bake in the center of a preheated 400 degree oven for 20-30 minutes until golden brown. Remove from the oven. Pierce to allow the steam to escape and leave to cool.

Mix the raspberries and honey. Stir the Drambuie into the whipping cream and whip until firm. Split the buns and fill with the raspberries and cream. Dust with the confectioners’ sugar and serve. We added a walnut half on the top of ours.

Drunken CrumbleDrunken Crumble
1 1/2 pounds raw rhubarb (Rhubarb isn’t in season right now so we used frozen cranberries. You can also use apples.)
3 oz. whiskey
grated lemon and orange rind to taste
1 cup of light brown sugar
1 tsp. Allspice

Topping:
2 cups flour
3 oz. butter
1/2 cup sugar
zest of 1 lemon
1 tsp. ground coriander
1 tsp. allspice

Clean and chop the rhubarb into pieces and put in a deep pie dish. Add the other ingredients for the filling and stir well.

Sift the flour into a large mixing bowl and cut in the butter with a fork until the mixture looks like small breadcrumbs. Add the sugar, grated lemon rind, coriander, and Allspice; mix well. Sprinkle the topping over the rhubarb.

Bake in a pre-heated oven at 400 degrees until golden brown. Serve hot with custard or ice cream. You can also opt for the Drambuie Whipped Cream from the Dornoch Dreams Buns recipe above.

Highland Beef with pickled walnutsHighlander Beef Stew
courtesy of bbcgoodfood.com
1 package ready-rolled puff pastry
1 egg, beaten

For the stew:
3 ½ lbs. stewing beef, cut into ½ inch squares
2 garlic cloves, peeled and crushed
1 bay leaf
14 oz. of dark stout beer
3 oz. butter
3 Tbsp. olive oil
3 ½ oz. smoked bacon, roughly chopped
3 large red onions, finely chopped
2 Tbsp. flour
2 oz. port wine
1 ¾ cup jar pickled walnuts, halved (reserve 2 tbsp pickling vinegar)
3 Tbsp. chopped fresh parsley, plus extra for garnish.

First, make the pastry puffs. Preheat the oven to 200 degrees. On a lightly floured surface, roll out the pastry a little thinner and stamp out sixteen rounds. Note: you can also get pastry puffs in little bowl shapes to avoid cutting them out. Put the rounds on a baking sheet and brush with the egg. Sprinkle with salt and bake in the oven for 5-7 minutes or until puffed and golden brown. Cool on a wire rack until ready to serve.

Make the stew. Put the beef, garlic, and bay leaf in a large non-metallic bowl and pour in the stout. Cover and leave to marinate in the fridge for at least an hour.

Preheat the oven to 150 degrees. Drain the meat and pat dry on kitchen paper. Set aside the marinade liquid. Heat both half the butter and oil in a large lidded ovenproof casserole dish or an iron skillet/pot with a lid. Over a high heat, brown the beef in batches until each piece is sealed and dark brown. Remove the meat with a slotted spoon as you go. Set aside.

Wipe the dish with kitchen paper, melt the remaining butter and oil and fry the bacon and onions for 10-15 minutes until the onions are golden brown, very soft, and well reduced. Stir in the flour until blended, add the port, parsley, walnuts, vinegar, and reserved marinade ; then return the beef to the dish. Bring to the boil. Next, cover with a tight-fitting lid and cook in the oven for 2½ -3 hours or until the meat is very tender (no need to season). Ladle into bowls, top with a couple of pastry puffs, and sprinkle with a little chopped parsley.

Recipes: Warming Winter Cocktails for 2017

It may be the winter of our discontent, but that doesn’t mean you can’t drink like a king. If you’re tired of the same cold weather cocktails to warm you, try these recipes for something to brighten your mood and thrill your taste buds.

Blood Orange Blazer
8 parts brewed hibiscus tea
2 parts Banks 7 Golden Age rum
1 part Hamilton Pimento Dram (Note: Pimento Dram is another name for Allspice Dram)
1 part blood orange juice
blood orange peel

Build in a preheated blue blazer mug. Garnish with a clove-studded spiral blood orange peel and serve.

Feather in CapsicumFeather in Capsicum
Created by Hendrick’s Gin Brand Ambassador, Mattias Horseman
2 parts Hendrick’s Gin
¾ parts lemon juice
½ part maple syrup
¼ teaspoon cayenne pepper

Combine ingredients and shake hard over ice. Strain into chilled coupette and garnish with a Maple Leaf (if possible) and lemon zest.

Rock Beets Scissor
1.5 oz. Medley Bros Bourbon
1/2 oz. Angostura Amaro
1/4 oz. Gran Classico
½ oz. lemon juice
½ oz. beet simple syrup
2 dashes orange bitters
egg white

Pour all ingredients into a shaker. Wet shake (meaning with ice), then dry shake (meaning no ice). Fine strain into chilled coupe; garnish with bitters and a candied beer chip.

To make candied beer chips:
1 lb. potato slices
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup + 2 Tbsp. beer (A stout is recommended)

Preheat oven to 400°F. Combine brown sugar and stout in a small bowl, whisking well to form a thin syrup. Set aside. Line a rimmed baking sheet with aluminum foil. Coat with a thin layer of cooking oil spray. Lay out the potato slices and coat the top side with another layer of cooking oil. Place in oven and cook for 10 minutes. Remove from oven and brush one side of the potato chips with the beer syrup. Flip, and coat the other side with the syrup as well. Return to oven and cook for 10 more minutes. Keep an eye on them so they do not burn. Remove from oven, and repeat process another time or two more, until chips are crispy and browned, and you’ve used all the glaze. Cool on wire rack for at least 1 hour before serving. This can also be made with bacon.

Q Winter Citrus SangriaQ Winter Citrus Sangria
12 oz. Q Club Soda
12 oz. Q Tonic
6 oz. Solerno Blood Orange Liqueur
8 oz. Cocci Americano Italian White Vermouth
12 oz. dry white wine
2 cups sliced winter citrus fruit (pink grapefruit, mandarin oranges, Cara Cara, lemon)
½ cup pomegranate arils
mint for garnish

Combine Solerno, Cocci Americano, and wine in a bowl and stir. Add sliced citrus and pomegranate arils, cover and refrigerate overnight to allow fruit to macerate. When ready to serve, transfer the mixture to a pitcher, top with Q Club Soda, Q Tonic, and stir to combine. Pour into ice-filled glasses and garnish with a sprig of mint.

Treasure Chest
1 oz. Cocchi Americano
1 oz. cinnamon and orange infused Wheatley vodka
¼ oz. Tempus Fugit Kina
¼ oz. Sandeman Fino sherry
1 dash orange bitters

Stir, then strain into chilled Nick & Nora glass. Express the lemon peel and discard, then garnish with a few drops of pistachio oil.

Broken Column
1 1/4 oz. pear infused Altos Blanco tequila
3/4 oz. Del Maguey Vida mezcal
3/4 oz. Alessio Chinato
1 bar spoon Fernet Branca
1 bar spoon agave
1 dash chocolate bitters

Stir, then strain into a chilled coupe. No garnish is needed.

The 8th Day
1 ½ parts Havana Club Añejo Clásico Puerto Rican Rum
3 parts chai tea
1 ¾ parts coconut milk
1 part simple syrup or 1 Tbsp. white sugar

Prepare Chai Tea. While the tea steeps, warm coconut milk over medium heat but do not boil. Combine ingredients in a high temperature resistant mixing glass; add rum last and stir. Serve in an Irish Coffee Cup or preferred glass coffee cup, and garnish with a cinnamon stick.

Mezcal Pumpkin Pie
From The Skylark, Mixologist Johnny Swet
2 spoons of pumpkin butter
2 oz. Ilegal Reposado Mezcal
3/4 oz. lime juice
½ oz. cinnamon syrup
½ oz. Feretti Biscotti Liquor

Shake ingredients with ice and strain into Rocks Glass. Dust with Nutmeg before serving.

The Spicy Buck
1 ½ oz. Dixie Black Pepper vodka
4 oz. ginger beer
1/4 tsp. pickled jalapeño juice
1 splash of soda
juice of 1/4 lime

Mix all ingredients into a shaker and stir. Pour into a glass with ice and Garnish with a pickled jalapeño slice and serve.

Cocktail Recipes: Get Drunk for Inauguration Day!

Bacardi Old Fashioned

Whether you’re celebrating the inauguration of America’s new president, mourning the outgoing administration, or simply looking for something historical to drink, we have a few suggestions. Here are some cocktails preferred by Presidents past — or created in their honor. (With a nod to information provided by the New York Post.) By the way: In interviews, Donald Trump says he doesn’t drink.

Harry S. Truman
Old Fashioned
Ingredients:
2 parts Bacardi 8 Anos rum
2 dashes Angostura bitters
1 splash water
1-2 tsp sugar
1 orange peel

In an old fashioned glass, combine the sugar, water, and Angostura bitters with a bar spoon. Add half the rum along with 2-3 ice cubes, stirring repeatedly. Pour in the second half of the rum and 2-3 more ice cubes, continuing to stir. Cut a piece of orange peel; express the orange peel over the drink to release the citrus oils. Drop the peel into the drink to finish and serve.

William McKinley
McKinley’s Delight (This was popular during his election campaign)
3 oz. rye whiskey (shoot for at least 100 proof)
1 oz. sweet vermouth
2 dashes cherry brandy
1 dash absinthe (Pernod may be substituted)

Combine all ingredients over ice in a pint glass and stir thoroughly. Strain into a chilled cocktail coupe. No garnish is needed.

Teddy Roosevelt
Mint Julep
10 to 12 fresh mint leaves (the President used fresh mint from the White House garden)
a splash water
1 sugar cube
2 or 3 oz. rye whiskey
¼ oz. brandy

In a highball glass, gently muddle the mint, sugar, and water. Fill the glass with cracked ice, add whiskey, and stir well until the glass is well frosted. Garnish with a mint sprig.

Calvin Coolidge
The Coolidge Cooler (Created by Vermont Spirits for his birthday)
1.5 oz. Vermont White vodka
½ oz. American whiskey
2 oz. orange juice
club soda

In a collins glass, add ice and all other ingredients except the club soda. Top with club soda. Stir and enjoy.

Franklin D. Roosevelt
Bermuda Rum Swizzle
2 oz. dark rum
1 oz. lime juice
1 oz. orange juice
1 generous dash of Falernum or bitters

It is recommended that this cocktail be stirred with an actual drink stirrer. Pour into a double old-fashioned glass filled with ice; stir and serve.

Ronald Reagan
Vodka Orange Blossom Special
1 oz. vodka
1 oz. sweet vermouth
2 oz. fresh orange juice

Stir together in a barroom glass filled with ice. Use soda instead of vermouth for a lighter, fizzier cocktail.

William Clinton
Snakebite
8 oz. hard cider
8 oz. lager beer
¼ oz. creme de cassis

Mix in a standard pint glass with no ice and serve.

We also offer a cocktail for a small gathering of friends and a punch for a party, whichever your plans are.

Bankside PunchBankside Punch
1 oz. Banks 5 Island rum
1/2 oz. lemon juice
1/4 oz. honey-sweetened tea
3/4 oz. mango puree (or juice)
3/4 oz. chilled water

Combine and chill all ingredients. When ready to serve, add to a punch bowl filled with one large ice block, 1 split vanilla bean, along with lemon and lime wheels. Serve in punch cups filled with ice and a grapefruit twist garnish.

Photos courtesy Bacardi, Banks.

Recipes: Celebrate Sailor Jerry’s 106th Birthday with 3 Cocktails

You can’t have an anniversary without a special anniversary edition bottle — and this one is certainly special, with Norman Collins’ photo on the back. You may know him better by another name:

January 14th marks the 106th birthday of the undisputed father of old school tattooing, Norman “Sailor Jerry” Collins. Known for his unapologetic attitude and all-American values, Norman Collins was a tattoo legend, a musician, radio host, biker, and served in the U.S. Navy.

After his time in the Navy, Collins made Hawaii his home and opened a tattoo parlor where he showcased the innovative craftsmanship and artistry that made him famous. He was an inspiration for many modern day artists and creators such as tattoo artists Oliver Peck, Michael Malone and artist turned designer Ed Hardy. Collins’ iconic flash art work has lived on in tattoo designs and art across the world.

Sailor Jerry Spiced Rum was created to honor Norman “Sailor Jerry” Collins, and the brand celebrates all of his personal passions – from the military and the inked community, to motorcycles and rock n’ roll, and to those people and partners who live their lives according to their beliefs.

To celebrate, Sailor Jerry Spiced Rum has teamed up with The Field Museum in Chicago, to host a special birthday celebration. The Field Museum’s Tattoo Exhibit is currently home to some of Norman Collins’ original tattoo flash artwork, so to honor the legend on his birthday, Oliver Peck from Spike TV’s Ink Master’s will be providing complimentary Norman Collins flash tattoos to a select number of attendees.

In honor of Mr. Collins, here are three cocktails to celebrate the tattooed icon.

This cool, refreshing cocktail called a Cherry Jerry is delightful. When garnishing with the cherry, why not add a couple of spoons of syrup from the maraschino cherry jar? The spiced rum plays off of the lemon-lime soda for a drink fit for a backyard picnic or poolside. Save this recipe for the hot months to come. You’ll be pleased with it.

Cherry Jerry
1 part Sailor Jerry Spiced Rum
3 parts lemon-lime soda
grenadine or Cherry Heering floater
garnish with a Jerry’s Cherry (see below)

Add all ingredients into a cocktail glass, garnish and serve.

Jerry’s Cherries
Drain a 10 ounce jar of Maraschino Cherries of their liquid. Fill with Sailor Jerry Spiced Rum. Return the lid and refrigerate for at least 1 week.

The ginger and rum mingle together in the Jerry Loves Ginger cocktail to make a wonderful blend of zing and spices. Don’t substitute ginger ale; you want to do the rum justice. This might also make a nice hot toddy. Simply heat up the ginger beer with a bag of chamomile tea to brew the tea. Add to a mug with the rum and a tJerry Loves Gingerablespoon of honey.

Jerry Loves Ginger
1 part Sailor Jerry Spiced Rum
3 parts ginger beer

Add Sailor Jerry to an empty highball glass, then fill with ice. Top with ginger beer and garnish with candied ginger.

A Ginger Spiced Negroni is a spicy take on a Negroni. We found the Campari a little overpowering in this cocktail, though it did lighten up as the ice melted. Perhaps using a half part would be better. It is definitely to be enjoyed as a slow sipper. Some people like their Negroni as a before-dinner drink but we recommend this one for later in the evening.

Ginger Spiced NegroniGinger Spiced Negroni
1 part Sailor Jerry Spiced Rum
1 part Campari
1/2 part ginger liqueur
1/2 part sweet vermouth

In empty mixing glass, measure Sailor Jerry. Add Campari, ginger liqueur, and sweet vermouth. Add a few chunks of ice and stir to blend flavors and dilute. Add more ice and repeat. Strain into empty chilled old fashioned glass. Add fresh ice block and garnish with candied ginger.