Recipes: Dessert Drinks with Kerrygold Irish Cream

Macchiato Martini

Kerrygold Irish Cream is the latest Irish cream liqueur on the market, and these two cocktails presented by the company are both delightful and worth checking out.

The Macchiato Martini will please those chocolate lovers among us. We like the idea of chocolate syrup because you can customize the chocolate to the imbiber — milk chocolate versus dark chocolate and how heavy they prefer either. A nice touch would be to add a dessert-like stick as a stirrer, such as a Pepperidge Farm Creme Filled Pirouette Rolled Wafer instead of the cookie crumbles. If you want to kick it up a notch, add an ounce of vodka.

Macchiato Martini
1 oz. Kerrygold Irish Cream Liqueur
1 shot espresso
1/2 oz. chocolate syrup

Shake all ingredients with ice. Strain the ingredients into a martini glass with no ice. Garnish with chocolate cookie crumbles.

The Butter Me Up cocktail will certainly butter up any fan of ice cream. Sweet and creamy, all it needs is a slice of cake on the side to turn it into a perfect birthday style celebration.

Butter Me UpButter Me Up
From The Blind Pig Speakeasy, Dublin
1 oz. Kerrygold Irish Cream Liqueur
1/2 oz. vanilla liqueur
1/2 oz. butterscotch liqueur
1 oz. fresh cream
1 scoop vanilla ice cream

Shake all of the ingredients with ice. Strain into a highball glass filled with ice. Garnish with 1/2 of a strawberry. (Why a half? Heck, go ahead and toss the whole strawberry in there, then enjoy!)

Recipe: Two Cocktails with Patron XO Café Liqueur

Patron Tequila is a favorite of many drinkers, so we whipped up a pair of their recommended cocktails featuring two tequilas from the Patron XO Café collection:  Patron XO Café Coffee and Patron XO Café Dark Cocoa. Both are luscious and would fit in as an after dinner drink or served with dessert.

The first is called Baby Stout. It is a very simple drink but packs in the flavor. The coffee flavors are sweet and strong like dark coffee, tasting like a creamy Irish cream espresso. Take a sip, roll it across your tongue to warm up the mouth and you’ll be ready for more.

Baby Stout
1 oz. Patron XO Café Coffee Tequila
.5 oz. Irish cream liqueur

Pour the Patron XO Café Coffee into a shot glass and chill. (You can also chill the Patron on its own first.) Top off with Irish cream so that it resembles a miniature glass of stout beer and serve.

The second recipe is Jalisco Coffee Swizzle. It calls for the Patron XO Café Coffee. Instead, we used Patron XO Café Dark Cocoa. Wonderfully sweet, the coffee tones blend through to the finish as the underlying chocolate joins in the pleasure. This one is recommended for the mocha lovers of the world.

Jalisco Coffee Swizzle
1.75 oz. Patron XO Café Dark Cocoa Tequila
1 oz. spiced sugar syrup  (We made our own with equal parts of sugar and water, then added cinnamon, allspice, and nutmeg before boiling to dissolve the sugar. Be sure to let it cool before using.)

Add both ingredients to an old fashioned glass, add crushed ice, and stir with a cinnamon stick. You can also garnish it with orange peel before serving.

Recipes: Celebrate Sailor Jerry’s 106th Birthday with 3 Cocktails

You can’t have an anniversary without a special anniversary edition bottle — and this one is certainly special, with Norman Collins’ photo on the back. You may know him better by another name:

January 14th marks the 106th birthday of the undisputed father of old school tattooing, Norman “Sailor Jerry” Collins. Known for his unapologetic attitude and all-American values, Norman Collins was a tattoo legend, a musician, radio host, biker, and served in the U.S. Navy.

After his time in the Navy, Collins made Hawaii his home and opened a tattoo parlor where he showcased the innovative craftsmanship and artistry that made him famous. He was an inspiration for many modern day artists and creators such as tattoo artists Oliver Peck, Michael Malone and artist turned designer Ed Hardy. Collins’ iconic flash art work has lived on in tattoo designs and art across the world.

Sailor Jerry Spiced Rum was created to honor Norman “Sailor Jerry” Collins, and the brand celebrates all of his personal passions – from the military and the inked community, to motorcycles and rock n’ roll, and to those people and partners who live their lives according to their beliefs.

To celebrate, Sailor Jerry Spiced Rum has teamed up with The Field Museum in Chicago, to host a special birthday celebration. The Field Museum’s Tattoo Exhibit is currently home to some of Norman Collins’ original tattoo flash artwork, so to honor the legend on his birthday, Oliver Peck from Spike TV’s Ink Master’s will be providing complimentary Norman Collins flash tattoos to a select number of attendees.

In honor of Mr. Collins, here are three cocktails to celebrate the tattooed icon.

This cool, refreshing cocktail called a Cherry Jerry is delightful. When garnishing with the cherry, why not add a couple of spoons of syrup from the maraschino cherry jar? The spiced rum plays off of the lemon-lime soda for a drink fit for a backyard picnic or poolside. Save this recipe for the hot months to come. You’ll be pleased with it.

Cherry Jerry
1 part Sailor Jerry Spiced Rum
3 parts lemon-lime soda
grenadine or Cherry Heering floater
garnish with a Jerry’s Cherry (see below)

Add all ingredients into a cocktail glass, garnish and serve.

Jerry’s Cherries
Drain a 10 ounce jar of Maraschino Cherries of their liquid. Fill with Sailor Jerry Spiced Rum. Return the lid and refrigerate for at least 1 week.

The ginger and rum mingle together in the Jerry Loves Ginger cocktail to make a wonderful blend of zing and spices. Don’t substitute ginger ale; you want to do the rum justice. This might also make a nice hot toddy. Simply heat up the ginger beer with a bag of chamomile tea to brew the tea. Add to a mug with the rum and a tJerry Loves Gingerablespoon of honey.

Jerry Loves Ginger
1 part Sailor Jerry Spiced Rum
3 parts ginger beer

Add Sailor Jerry to an empty highball glass, then fill with ice. Top with ginger beer and garnish with candied ginger.

A Ginger Spiced Negroni is a spicy take on a Negroni. We found the Campari a little overpowering in this cocktail, though it did lighten up as the ice melted. Perhaps using a half part would be better. It is definitely to be enjoyed as a slow sipper. Some people like their Negroni as a before-dinner drink but we recommend this one for later in the evening.

Ginger Spiced NegroniGinger Spiced Negroni
1 part Sailor Jerry Spiced Rum
1 part Campari
1/2 part ginger liqueur
1/2 part sweet vermouth

In empty mixing glass, measure Sailor Jerry. Add Campari, ginger liqueur, and sweet vermouth. Add a few chunks of ice and stir to blend flavors and dilute. Add more ice and repeat. Strain into empty chilled old fashioned glass. Add fresh ice block and garnish with candied ginger.

Recipe: Bourbon and Barrel Aged Imperial Stout Pecan Pie with Bourbon Crust and Malted Whipped Cream

This incredible pecan pie recipe comes from Homebrewchef.com, which adapted it from a recipe in Beer Advocate magazine. I made this with Jim Beam Double Oak Twice Barreled Bourbon. For the Russian Imperial Stout, I used So Happens It’s Tuesday from The Bruery (A / $20 per 750ml bottle), which is aged in bourbon barrels. I was surprised to find the stout had a sour side to it and initially worried it would negatively impact the pie. However, I also used dark corn syrup instead of the light listed in the recipe ingredients. The two balanced one another nicely. The pie filling came out sweet, but not syrupy sweet.

Traditionally, cooks use vodka instead of water in their pie crusts. The reason for this is because the alcohol evaporates, leaving a flaky crust. This recipe calls for bourbon instead of vodka and it worked well for the same reasons. I also loved the use of barley flour in the crust for something truly unique. I found the flour at our local community market.

This recipe also needs dry malt extract (DME), which is not something normally found in the supermarket. I did get mine from the local The Beverage People shop. They do have a website to order from here. It is interesting to note that DME is used in the center of candy malted milk balls. No wonder they are so good! I also recommend the use of real maple syrup and not the imitation kind; a pie this good deserves the real thing.

With the whipped cream, the malt extract adds a malty sweetness to the bourbon and cream flavors. The recipe called for powdered milk. This is an important ingredient as it gives the whipped cream body. I used real heavy cream for mine. The taste is heavenly.

Most of the alcohol, except for the bourbon in the whipped cream, cooks off so there is no real alcohol content to speak of…only the wonderful, warm flavor.

This pie is a bit expensive to make because of the unusual ingredients, not found normally at the grocery store, and the alcohol. However, this is the best pecan pie I have ever tasted. Some things, like fine foods and good beer and spirits, are worth the money spent on them, particularly when they are for a special occasion. This pecan pie is no exception and I highly recommend it.

Here is the recipe. I should also note the crust is for two pies, while the filling is for one. I simply doubled the filling ingredients and baked two pies, which serves twelve slices. Preparation time is about 20 minutes. Cooking time is 60 minutes.

Bourbon Barley Pie Crust
• 1 1/2 cups flour, unbleached all purpose
• 1/2 cup flour, barley
• 1/2 cup flour, pastry
• 3 tablespoons Dry Malt Extract (DME)
• 1 teaspoon sea salt
• 8 ounces unsalted butter
• 4 – 5 tablespoons Bourbon, ice cold

Stout Pecan Filling
• 3 each eggs, jumbo at room temperature
• 3 each eggs, jumbo, yolks only, at room temperature
• 1/2 cup Dry Malt Extract (DME)
• 1/2 cup sugar, organic
• 1/2 cup Bourbon Barrel Aged Imperial Stout
• 1/2 cup light corn syrup
• 1/4 cup maple syrup
• 4 tablespoons unsalted butter
• 1/2 teaspoon salt, kosher
• 3 cups shelled pecan halves

Malted Whipping Cream
• 1 cup heavy cream
• 3 tablespoons Dry Malt Extract (DME)
• 1 tablespoon sugar
• 1 tablespoon milk powder
• 2 tablespoons Bourbon

Bourbon Barley Pie Crust Directions:
• In the bowl of a food processor, add the flours, DME, and salt. Pulse several times to mix the ingredients together. Add the cold butter cubes to the bowl and pulse a few times to cut the fat into the flour mixture.
• Keep pulsing until the mixture has small grain size chunks of fat evenly distributed throughout the mixture.
• With the motor running, quickly add the bourbon until the mixture just forms a ball. Since the alcohol mixed with flour cannot form gluten like water and flour can, over mixing isn’t as much of an issue with this crust. Plus the alcohol will evaporate (40% alcohol), resulting in a flaky crust. Form the dough into two equal size balls. Take plastic wrap and wrap each ball of dough, pressing down on each to create a disk. Place in the refrigerator for at least 30 minutes to re-chill, while fully hydrating the flour, making it easier to work with and helping the crust from shrinking as it cooks.
• Preheat the oven to 350°F | 177°C. Take one dough ball and roll it out to ¼ of an inch thick round on a lightly floured surface. If you don’t have a rolling pin, use a 22 oz bottle that is chilled will also work. Place it in your pie dish or tin. Crimp the edges of the crust and set aside. Use the second pie crust for another pie (try apple) or another application like turn overs.

Stout Pecan Filling Directions:
• In a large bowl, add the eggs and yolks (saving the whites for another recipe), whisking until light and frothy. Add the DME, sugar, Imperial Stout, corn syrup, maple syrup, melted butter, and salt; mix well. Add in the pecan halves and mix to coat. Pour this mixture into the prepared pie crust, smoothing out any pecans which are sticking out. Place into the center of the oven and bake for 50 to 60 minutes, until the custard is set. Remove from the oven and let cool completely before serving.

Malted Whipped Cream Directions:
• In a cold metal bowl, add the cold cream, DME, sugar, milk powder, and bourbon. Using a whisk, beat until soft peaks form. Top each slice of pie with a healthy dollop and serve.

Homebrewchef recommends pairing the pie with Parabola Russian Imperial Stout from Firestone Walker Brewing Company (A / $20 per 650ml bottle). This recommendation was spot on as the flavors of both the stout and the pie mingled well together on the tongue. I also recommend, for the wine folks reading, pairing this pie with a Kelley and Young Late Harvest Zinfandel, from Robert Young Vineyards (A+ / $36 per 375ml bottle).

Recipe: Two Tequila Cocktails for National Hot Toddy Day


The typical Hot Toddy is made with whiskey. In honor of National Hot Toddy Day, here’s a spin on the formula. The following two recipes have a nice tequila twist to them and are brought to us from 1800 Tequila.

The first is Miner’s Cough, which will delight coffee lovers around the world. The tequila enhances the bitters just enough to bring out an underlying chocolate note. Boldly sweet, the dark roast coffee intensifies towards the end of the sip. The lager whipped cream is not as sweet, which makes it an airy compliment to the entire cocktail.

Miner’s Cough
2 oz. 1800 Añejo Tequila
1 oz. dark roast coffee
3 dashes chocolate bitters
1/2 oz. agave nectar
top with lager whipped cream

Combine all ingredients into shaker. Shake for 10 seconds and strain into a rocks glass. Top with Lager Whipped Cream and garnish with shaved chocolate.

To make the lager whipped cream:
1 cup heavy cream
1/3 cup powdered sugar
2 tbsp lager beer (We used Sam Adams Boston Lager)

Add the cream and powdered sugar to a stand mixer. Beat on high until soft peaks form. While mixer is running, add the lager and vanilla, beat until soft peaks return. (A stout beer may also be substituted if preferred.)

For a more traditional Hot Toddy, except for the alcohol base, try a Jalisco’s Toddy. It is lightly sweetened by the honey which is punctuated by the ginger and lemon. The chamomile and cinnamon mix with the cider and tequila for a belly-warming drink. Be warned though—drink this while it’s hot. Once tepid, it’s taste resembles a cough drop. Then again, if you have a cold, that might be just what you need.

Jalisco’s Toddy
2 oz. 1800 Añejo Tequila
2 oz. chamomile tea
3/4 oz. apple cider
1/2 oz. honey syrup (equal parts honey and water, simmered for five minutes)
1/2 oz. lemon juice
2 slices ginger root (ground ginger can also be used but it will not be as prevalent in the overall drink taste)
pinch of ground cinnamon

In a pot, combine the apple cider, ginger root, lemon juice, and cinnamon.  Allow to heat up to a rolling boil. Next brew the tea. Add more than one tea bag, so flavor is heightened. In a glass, add the tequila and honey syrup. Stir and combine heated tea, cider, and tequila mixture. Garnish with lemon peel and a cinnamon stick.

How to Make a Flawless Manhattan Cocktail

Prohibition-era cocktails are absolutely booming in popularity right now, so it should come as no surprise that curious drinkers are looking for easy-to-craft period-style cocktails to try and learn. The manhattan has a lot going for it to the novice mixologist: it’s delicious, it looks lovely, and it’s very easy to make. If you’ve ever had a manhattan in a bar or a restaurant and want to try your hand at making your own, follow along!

To start, let’s gather our equipment together. A typical manhattan is served in a cocktail glass (same thing as a martini glass), though there are plenty of establishments that serve theirs in a more simple highball or even rocks glass. The stem of the cocktail glass will keep your fingers from warming your drink; this is important because the best manhattan is served ice-cold. Other than the glass you’re going to serve your drink in, you need a mixing glass and a strainer.

In the glass, a manhattan is a mix of bourbon or rye whiskey, sweet vermouth, bitters, and a maraschino cherry. This is the real meat of the manhattan experience; with so many different styles of whiskey and vermouth, you can suit the drink to your own taste, or the taste of whoever you’re serving to. Let’s go through each of these in turn.

First up, you have to answer the age-old mixologist question: bourbon or rye? With the popularity of the ‘authentic’ manhattan, there are those who would scoff at anything other than rye whiskey, which was how the drink was made in the 1870s when it was first invented. Bourbon will make your drink sweeter, since the corn used to make bourbon is sweeter than the rye used to make rye whiskey. Considering you’re adding sweet vermouth and a cherry, the addition of a sweeter bourbon like Maker’s Mark might be overkill, but on the other hand if you’re just getting into mixology, you might be looking for a sweeter drink. If you decide to go with bourbon, the vanilla candy of the aforementioned Maker’s is a popular choice, as are the more balanced tastes of Four Roses or Eagle Rare. If you want a more rugged, traditional rye manhattan, Bulleit is a popular, inexpensive choice, and if High West has made a bad whiskey, we haven’t yet tried it. Of course, if you want a truly flawless manhattan, WhistlePig is a pricey but excellent choice: 100% rye, dry and spicy, which will imbue your drink with pepper and subtle cinnamon.

So you have your whiskey, now what about vermouth? Vermouth is Italian wine, fortified and imbued with all manner of bitter herbs and roots, like a cross between a port and an aperitif liqueur. You use dry vermouth in martinis, and sweet vermouth in manhattans (with the exception of variants like the dry manhattan and perfect manhattan, which we won’t delve into in this post). If you’ve already picked up the WhistlePig, do yourself a favor and complement it with a bottle of Carpano Antica vermouth, which is complex, cola- and chocolate-sweet while at the same time herbal and bitter. It’s perfect for a manhattan, and not bad on its own before a meal. Other choices, depending on the whiskey used, could be Punt e Mes, which is darker and richer and bolder than most other sweet vermouths, and the lightly sweet, anise-tinged Maurin Red. And when you’re done with mixing for the night, don’t forget that vermouth is a wine and can spoil, so keep it refrigerated to make it last longer.

What about bitters and a cherry? For bitters, the traditional Angostura bitters work perfectly, just a couple dashes to bring out the bitterness of the whiskey and the vermouth and give your drink a few more layers to contemplate. Woodford Reserve has made a series of bitters designed just for manhattans, as well. Its cherry bitters could be perfect for a bourbon-based cocktail. For a cherry, Luxardo’s claim as one of the innovators of the maraschino cherry is something to consider; if you don’t mind spending a lot on a bottle of cherries they really are delicious. Otherwise, simple Bing cherries aren’t so overwhelmingly sweet as others, and of course Woodford has you covered for specialty cocktail cherries, as well.

So you have all of your ingredients? Then let’s put everything together! The typical manhattan uses a 2:1 ratio for whiskey and vermouth, though your mileage may vary if you want a little more of a kick from the whiskey, or a little more sweetness from the vermouth. In addition to the vermouth and whiskey, add 2 or 3 dashes of bitters, to taste. Before you start mixing, chill your cocktail glass and your mixing glass in the freezer for 15 minutes or so, then put the whiskey, vermouth, and bitters, along with plenty of ice, into the mixing glass. Stir, don’t shake, to mix; like gin, whiskey can bruise easily, which will leave your cocktail muddled and rough. Chilling your glassware should make sure that your drink stays cold without the need to shake. Strain the concoction from the mixing glass to the cocktail glass, garnish with a cherry, and you’re done! It’s a couple of brief minutes of work to create one of the tastiest, easiest cocktails there is.

Recipes: 2016 New Year’s Eve Cocktails

With the end of 2016 fast approaching, we can all breathe a collective sigh of relief that the year is over and a fresh new start awaits us all. Here are a few last minute cocktail recipe ideas for your gathering. On behalf of the staff here at Drinkhacker, we’d like to wish you a safe and happy 2017. Thank you for stopping by our little corner of the internet for almost a decade now, and we’d like to see you here for our 10th anniversary celebration, so where ever New Year’s Eve takes you, please celebrate responsibly!

Midori Sparkle
3 parts Champagne
3/4 part fresh grapefruit juice
1/2 part Midori melon liqueur

In a champagne flute, combine champagne and grapefruit juice. Top with Midori.

Golden Hour
2 parts Stoli elit Vodka
1 part Contratto Vermouth Bianco
¼ part Luxardo Maraschino liqueur
2 dashes of Angostura bitters
2 dashes of Orange bitters
Absinthe spray
edible gold flake garnish

Stir all ingredients with ice and strain into a martini glass that has been sprayed with absinthe. Garnish with edible gold flake.

The Smokin’ Churro
3 orange slices
½ oz. molasses
¾ oz. Ancho Reyes Chile Liqueur
2 oz. Tanteo Chocolate Tequila

In a pint glass, muddle orange slices and molasses. Add Ancho Reyes Tanteo Chocolate and ice. Shake well. Strain over fresh ice into a rock glass. Garnish with a cinnamon-sugar dusted orange slice.

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