Review: Wyoming Whiskey National Parks No. 3 Limited Edition Bourbon

Review: Wyoming Whiskey National Parks No. 3 Limited Edition Bourbon

Wyoming Whiskey dropped the third installment in their National Parks Collection last fall, this time paying tribute to the Grand Teton National Park with a substantial $150,000 donation to the park’s philanthropic partner, the Grand Teton National Park Foundation. It’s an impressive gesture that speaks to the importance of Grand Teton not just for Wyoming Whiskey’s brand identity but also co-founders Brad and Kate Mead, whose ranching business drives cattle on Grand Teton land annually, and David DeFazio, who visits the park year-round for recreation.

As with previous National Parks Collection releases, this is a limited edition small batch straight bourbon made from 68% corn, 20% wheat, and 12% malted barley, bottled at a touch over 100 proof and aged at least five years. Let’s dig in.

The nose showcases that familiar Wyoming Whiskey maltiness and depth with graham crackers and an oak profile that presents as older than its stated age, accented by old barn floors and a bit of rickhouse funk. As it opens, the fruit notes build with dried orange slice and pawpaw fruit, a uniquely bright, citrus quality that becomes a defining feature of the palate. Initial notes of freshly peeled tangerine and clove-studded orange peel give way to marmalade on the midpalate. A bit of baking spice and buttery caramel play second fiddle to that higher tone sweetness but eventually muscle in on a generous finish of butterscotch, toffee, and Creamscicle. Another fitting tribute to America’s cherished parklands and well worth the ten-dollar upcharge from last year’s release.

105 proof.

A- / $80 / wyomingwhiskey.com [BUY IT NOW FROM FROOTBAT]

Wyoming Whiskey National Parks No. 3 Limited Edition Bourbon

$70
9

Rating

9.0/10

Drew Beard is assistant editor for Drinkhacker and winner of several booze-related merit badges, including Certified Specialist in Spirits and Executive Bourbon Steward. A former federal employee turned hotelier and spirits journalist, he looks forward to his next midlife crisis.

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