Review: Siegfried Rheinland Dry Gin

Dunno about you, but when I think of Germany, my thoughts immediately run to gin. Gin! Siegfried isn’t the only German gin — in fact, Germany’s Monkey 47 is one of the best you can find — but they are still relatively rare, at least in the U.S.

Here’s a little information about Siegfried, straight from the distiller. I’m leaving all the poor grammar from a bad translation intact because I find it endearing:

Siegfried Rheinland Dry Gin is a regional product from the German area of “Rheinromantik” and a classic Dry Gin: a defined taste, subtle enough to delight with a weighted composition of 18 fine Botanicals, his charm and straight character.

The linden tree has a leading role in the ancient German Nibelung Saga, where a leaf landed on Siegfried’s back, while enjoying his bath in a defeated dragon’s blood. Like in the saga, linden also change the game in Siegfried’s recipe. Linden blooms are the lead botanical, create a unique taste experience and at the same time underline the symbiotic connection between brand and product.

So, of the 18 botanicals in Siegfried, we know just one: linden blooms. I don’t know a lot about linden trees, but Wikipedia has some pretty pictures. The blossoms are said to be quite fragrant (and beloved by bees), but the aroma isn’t described.

As for the gin, it is quite a bit different than a traditional gin, which relies on the distinct flavor and aroma of juniper berries to give it its signature character. Here the overall character is instantly unusual, but appealing on the nose with a more floral character that is reminiscent of lavender and lilac, with just a hint of woodsy evergreen. The palate is equally unorthodox, building on the floral base with heavily aromatic notes of camphor and jasmine, before turning to a lightly earthy, woody, mushroom-like character. This isn’t entirely in balance, as the floral elements overwhelm everything else, and the finish takes the gin into a slightly rubbery territory — particularly evident as it lingers on the tongue.

It’s a unique experience — and often an engaging one — but cocktail mavens will need to experiment heavily to find the right pairing. (I’m thinking elderflower, lime juice, and other sweet-tart mixers.)

82 proof. Batch #049.

B+ / $31 / siegfriedgin.com

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0 Responses

  1. Schnaps brennen January 25, 2017 / 2:34 am

    If I have the choice I prefer Monkey Gin. It´s the best you can buy in Germany!
    And Siegfried is a good choice too. The taste of Linden is an amazing experience!.

  2. Robin January 25, 2017 / 2:37 am

    If you have the choice, than prefer Monkey Gin! It´s the best one in Germany.
    But also Siegfried is one of the best gin you can get. The taste of linden is an amazing experience!

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