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This antique was unearthed on a visit to Texas and dates back to at least the late 1800s. But what is it? What was it used for? About 4 inches tall, it looks like an egg cup for a quail egg or a tiny wine decanter… but neither of these seems to fit. Photo below, with a billiard ball shown for scale.

Ideas on what it is? Post ’em here.

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Christopher Null

Christopher Null is the founder and editor in chief of Drinkhacker. A veteran writer and journalist, he also operates Null Media, a bespoke content company.

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8 Comments

  1. Travis Webster April 3, 2011

    It’s a whiskey chaser, which is molded in such a way that a shot of whiskey can float on two ounces of water. Pretty awesome, really.
    http://www.funtocollect.com/jdonwatersmall.html

    Reply
  2. Adam April 3, 2011

    At the liquor store I work at we’ve always called them boilermaker glasses. I’ve recently been suggesting it be used for a Pickleback shot.

    Reply
  3. Christopher Null April 3, 2011

    Thanks Travis — the original Sliz cup, I guess! https://www.drinkhacker.com/2011/02/07/review-sliz-cups/

    Reply
  4. Dan April 3, 2011

    Also called Quaffers. Had one in college, definitely a novelty item.
    http://www.quaffer.com

    Reply
  5. Boozeblogger April 4, 2011

    Actually, that’s from my bachelor party Christopher. It came free with the 7-layer rainbow shot at the Dave & Buster’s bar. Mine even has a logo.

    Reply
  6. Duke E. April 5, 2011

    I hate to bring non-booze matters into this, but that might not be a drinking vessel at all. It might be a glass eye wash cup — the sort of thing used to wash dangerous chemicals out of one’s eye at that time.

    Reply
  7. CZ April 20, 2011

    The booze stores by me always called them “double bubbles”… which as mentioned before has the chaser in the larger lower portion and the shot in the upper smaller portion. Makes it so the shot comes out pretty much untainted and the chaser quickly follows.

    Reply
  8. JW March 23, 2012

    I have two of these previously owned by my parents, probably purchased in the 1940’s or 1950’s. I was told they were boilermaker glasses, beer in the bottom, whiskey on top. Mine are of thinner glass.

    Reply

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