Review: Popcorn Sutton Barrel Finished Moonshine

Popcorn Barrel Finished - TransparentPopcorn Sutton fans take note: A limited edition, barrel-finished version of the company’s moonshine is now arriving. This expression ages Popcorn’s white whiskey in a new oak barrel with a #3 char. No length of aging is stated, but the company does note that it includes no caramel color or grain neutral spirit added. You might expect otherwise, though, given the intense brown color of the resulting whiskey.

On the nose, Popcorn Sutton Barrel Finished Moonshine offers the traditional notes of a very young bourbon or other American whiskey — heavy wood influence, modest vanilla, and a touch of charred popcorn. Sweetness persists beneath all of this, more molasses than the cane sugar of straight Popcorn Sutton.

The body is in line with expectations, a mix of dusky charcoal notes, pure sugar, vanilla cream, and buttered popcorn. This all comes together more effectively than you’d expect, though the finish has a lot of that chalky, soot-laden character, indicating youth. At the same time, Popcorn Sutton Barrel Finished isn’t particularly rustic, its sweetness managing to smooth out the experience enough to at least make the spirit wholly approachable, if not exactly elevated.

Remember, of course, this is still moonshine — just moonshine that’s been given a taste of the “real” whiskey lifestyle.

92 proof.

B / $50 / popcornsutton.com

Review: Brora 37 Years Old Limited Edition 2015

Brora 37 (Medium)

Our final (final final) bottling in the Diageo Special Editions, this 37 year old Brora, from the northern Highlands of Scotland, is the oldest (of 14 releases) of Brora ever bottled in this series, following a series of 35 year old expressions. Distilled in 1977, it has been aged fully in refill American oak hogsheads.

Brora has long been my favorite in the Diageo Special Editions, and the last few years’ releases of 35 year old bottlings have been second to none in Scotch whisky.

At 37 years of age, though, something seems lacking. The nose offers a familiar mix of honey and citrus, yet comes off a bit astringent, with a heavily perfumed element on the back end. The body is more successful, with gently peat layered atop notes of honey buns, crisp apple, blood orange, and toffee. Yet, there’s something the slightest bit off here, the flavor profile being pulled in a few too many directions, and the finish taking things in a slightly vegetal bent.

I enjoyed the whisky immensely, but it’s a step back from some of the most recent, stellar Broras we’ve seen. Not exactly a tragedy, but perhaps it’s a triple when you were hoping for another home run.

100.8 proof. 2976 bottles produced.

A- / $1800 / malts.com

Review: Pittyvaich 25 Years Old Limited Edition 2015

Pittyvaich 25

Why don’t you know anything about Pittyvaich? Because the Speyside distillery was built in 1975 and torn down in 1993. As Diageo notes, this Special Edition release, distilled in 1989, survived longer than the distillery itself did.

Aged in refill American oak and first-fill ex-bourbon barrels, this is classic non-sherried Speyside from start to finish. On the nose, it’s surprisingly racy, its golden hues offering up gentle malt, heather, warm honey, butterscotch, and gentle vanilla.

In keeping with the luscious nose, the body is fairly hot yet quite well rounded, its oily, honey-dripping body showcasing a variety of treasures. Mild citrus, almonds, a smattering of baking spice — all come together quite beautifully to present themselves atop an enchantingly sweet palate, with a lingering finish that recalls Sauternes, honey syrup, and a slight dusting of cinnamon. Balanced just right, it showcases an achingly gorgeous sweetness without ever becoming cloying. It may not be incredibly complex, but its intensive focus on a handful of key, nicely harmonized flavors elevate this malt considerably.

A highlight of the 2015 Specials, at a “mere” $350, it’s also one of the best bargains in this year’s lineup.

99.8 proof. 5922 bottles produced.

A / $350 / malts.com

Review: Dalwhinnie 25 Years Old Limited Edition 2015

 

Dalwhinnie 25

When we covered the 2015 Diageo Special Releases, we were bummed to receive samples of only 6 of the 9 malts released this year. Then, out of the blue, the final three in the series showed up on the doorstep. At last, we are able to present our coverage of the late 2015 releases from Dalwhinnie, Pittyvaich, and Brora.

Let’s start with Dalwhinnie 25, made at the highest and coldest distillery in Scotland. Distilled in 1989 and aged for 25 years in refill American oak hogsheads.

A bit salty and sweaty on the nose, its aroma is actually a little off-putting, with seaweed and animal feed notes where you wouldn’t expect to find them. The body is more appealing, but still green and on the maritime side: Salty, slightly oxidized, with lingering notes of almond, green apple, lemon peel, chamomile, and a bit of petrol.

The finish is short but relatively clean, heavily perfumed but also loaded with some roasted grain notes. All told it drinks like a younger malt, enjoyable enough but not a real standout.

97.6 proof. 5916 bottles produced.

B / $500 / malts.com

Review: High West Bourye (2016)

bourye_bottle_2015One of the icons of new wave distilling is back: High West Bourye, which is returning to limited release right about now.

The 2016 Bourye is, as always, a touch different from its forebears. This version of the now-classic bourbon and rye blend features a mashup of 9-year-old straight bourbon (75% corn, 21% rye, 4% barley malt), 13-year-old straight rye whiskey (95% rye, 5% barley malt), and 17-year-old straight rye whiskey (95% rye, 5% barley malt) — all from MGP. As always, the proportions of these three whiskeys are not disclosed — but the overall focus looks a lot like the 2015 rendition of this spirit, which also featured a nine-year-old-minimum. The major difference is really that everything in the bottle is from MGP this year.

Bourye is a whiskey I have always admired, and this year’s release is no exception, though it presents much differently than the fruity 2015. The nose is exotic and a bit unusual — heavy on the cloves, along with dark brown sugar, dark toast, barrel char, and some freshly burnt rubber — all meant in a good way.

On the palate, it’s sweet but restrained, a host of bittering elements — more cloves (classic Bourye), licorice, toasty wood, and a touch of roasted vegetable character. The caramel and vanilla notes endure above all of this, though, the bitterness catching in the back of the throat as the whiskey finds a balance slightly on the savory side of the wheel.

This is a significantly different whiskey than last year’s release — and frankly I prefer the sweeter 2015 edition to a slight extent. That said, this return to a more frontier style will likely resonate with more of the hardcore American whiskey fans.

Reviewed: Batch 15X20. 92 proof.

A / $80 / highwest.com [BUY IT NOW FROM CASKERS]

Book Review: The Year of Drinking Adventurously

year of drinknigWriter Jeff Cioletti wants you to put down the Budweiser and the shot of JD. “Drinking adventurously” means exploring the vast array of beverages the world has to offer, and Cioletti guides you through 52 of them in a guidebook that is meant to be consumed one chapter (and type of drink) each week.

Cioletti starts us off with Scotch, exploring the islands in addition to safer Speyside. From there it’s on to bourbon and rye, then quickly into such exotic categoris as baijiu, soju, pulque, and blueberry wine. It’s an adventure indeed: Some of these categories (namely the blueberry wine) I’ve never even encountered myself.

As a primer on the entire world of drinking, some areas (gueuze) are naturally far more adventurous than others (Canadian whisky), but Cioletti ultimately shows himself more interested in taking you on a global trek of alcoholic drink exploration, not just forcing Korean snake wine down your throat. There’s even a chapter on vodka included.

And that’s not a slight. Not every book needs to be a nerd-level deep dive into the rabbit hole of wine, beer, and spirits. So long as you understand going in that you’re not going to learn everything there is to know about Scotch in nine pages of text, this book is definitely worthwhile and often lots of fun, to boot.

A- / $14 /  [BUY IT NOW FROM AMAZON]

Review: Lillet Rose

lilletThere’s a third (and while it’s not new, it’s the newest) member of the Lillet aromatic wine family: Lillet Rose, which rides the line between the crisp Lillet Blanc and the dark red Lillet Rouge.

Lillet Rose is a moderate pink in hue, and it fits right in between these two classic apertif wines.

Made primarily from semillon grapes (the same base as Lillet Blanc) with the addition of liqueurs made from berries and sweet and bitter oranges, the wine could pass as a hearty rose if you didn’t know better. The deep-down herbal notes give it away as Lillet, but here the addition of the liqueurs add both sweetness and nuance. Lots of orange notes give this a bittersweet bite, with a finish that recalls pink lemonade, fresh rosemary, and even a little bitter cocoa powder.

Is it heresy to say this might be my favorite expression of the three for straight sipping? Bring on the summer.

34 proof.

A- / $16 / lillet.com