Review: Tomatin Single Malts: 12, 14, 15, and 18 Years Old — Plus 1988 Vintage

tomatin 525x225 Review: Tomatin Single Malts: 12, 14, 15, and 18 Years Old    Plus 1988 Vintage

Highlands-based Tomatin offers a classic experience of Scotland in a glass — even though it is actually owned by Japan’s Takara Shuzo company.

Tomatin is shaking up the brand of late, introducing a new 14 Year Old expression and a 1988 Vintage expression to the core line (while the latter lasts, I presume), while discontinuing both the 15 and 30 Year Old expressions. (That said, we have a review of the 15 below.) The 12 Year is also getting a proof upgrade.

The only member of the new five-expression Tomatin lineup we don’t have reviewed here is Legacy, Tomatin’s entry-level, no-age-statement bottling.

Thoughts on everything else, though, follow.

Tomatin 12 Years Old Sherry Cask Finish - Finished in Oloroso sherry casks, this 12 year old whisky noses like a more mature spirit, balancing its cereal notes with some light smokiness and iodine character. On the palate, the chewy malt is balanced with notes of heather and more of those smoky wisps, with a burnt orange peel character coming along on the finish in the back of the throat. I’d love more fruit here, but Tomatin 12 is so well-balanced — despite its simplicity — that it’d almost be a shame to change anything. 86 proof (recently upgraded from 80 proof). A- / $30

Tomatin 14 Years Old Port Wood Finish – The higher alcohol level dulls the nose on this whisky, finished in Tawny Port pipes for about a year. After a time, the nose takes on an intensely woody, cedar box, tobacco leaf character. The body also has lots of wood bark, plus dark chocolate, coffee, and some cinnamon. Again, the fruit is held in check, and the expected raisiny sweetness from Port finishing never materializes. Not bad, though. 92 proof. B+ / $55

Tomatin 15 Years Old – This whisky is on the verge of being discontinued, so grab it while you can. The only whisky in this lineup that has a full maturation in ex-Bourbon casks, with no finishing. It’s markedly lighter in color than the other whiskys in this roundup, by a good margin. Hospital notes are strong on the nose here, with tons of cereal coming forth on the body, plus undercurrents of marshmallow, banana, and a bit of smokiness on the back end. More of a journeyman whisky than even the 12 Year Old. Perfectly serviceable, but I can understand the phase-out. 86 proof. B / $45

Tomatin 18 Years Old Oloroso Sherry Finish – Finished in sherry casks. A little sweaty on the nose, with more of that iodine character than the other Tomatin expressions. The body is pure sherry, though. This is a well-matured whisky with a big body and a chewy fruitiness to it. Lots of fresh plums, macerated apricots, and juicy oranges to go around, with a bit of sandalwood on the finish. Big whisky, with lots to like once the odd nose blows away, revealing more of a honey character. Amazing value for an 18 year old whisky. 92 proof. A- / $60

Tomatin 1988 Vintage Batch #1 – Matured in both Bourbon and Port barrels, this first batch of Tomatin 1988 (roughly 25-26 years old, by my count) is available in a selection of 2500 bottles. Surprisingly austere and malty on the nose, with a floral element to it. The body’s got an air of oatmeal cookies, buttery toffee, and indistinct flowers, with a bit of a vegetal note on the finish. I got no Port character here at all, rather mainly a rich maltiness that tends to overpower everything. I’d like to see more complexity at this price level. 92 proof. B+ / $250

tomatin.com

Review: Our/Vodka Berlin

ourvodka front 661x1024 525x813 Review: Our/Vodka Berlin

What happens when one of the biggest vodka producers in the world decides to go hyperlocal? Our/Vodka, that’s what.

Absolut’s audacious Our/Vodka project, 3 1/2 years in the making, began rolling out earlier this year: The idea, to produce a number of “glocal” renditions of the iconic spirit. It works like this. Absolut selects a city, where it funds and builds a distillery, then hands the reins over to a local entrepreneur distiller. They then take the brand and run with it, making vodka using a recipe provided by Absolut but using only local ingredients and water. Bottles are small (just 350ml) and feature a generic label indicating the city the vodka came from. The idea (in part) is to see how each city’s vodka compares — essentially looking at how terroir impacts “neutral” spirits. Up first: Berlin (reviewed here) and Detroit.

By the way, depending on which bottle you get, you’ll notice the label says it is “vodka with a flavor.” Says Absolut: “The thing with the German label is that when we first did them, we didn’t know for sure if our patented yeast (that has been developed by the Pernod Ricard research center) and that can carry flavor fractions through fermentation, would pass without having to put “flavor” on the bottle. Now we know that we don’t need it.”

Finally, let’s look at Our/Vodka Berlin — aka “Local Vodka by Our/Berlin” — the first product to come from this project. The nose is extremely mild, just hints here and there of bananas, walnuts, orange candies, and cherries. Nothing major, but enough to make things interesting. The body is even less punchy. Very simple, some mild fruit flavors — again those lightly sweetened orange candies — are the most evident secondary characteristic, but on the whole Our/Berlin comes across as simple to the point of being almost too clean. Our/Vodka is bizarrely bottled at just 75 proof, which is part of the reason why the flavor is so neutral — almost like sipping on water, which makes it go down much too easily. That’s both a good and a bad thing, but it does set an interesting starting point for this series. Hopefully we’ll be able to compare it the vodkas that come from Detroit and elsewhere down the line.

A- / $18 (350ml) / ourvodka.com

Review: New England Distilling Gunpowder Rye

 Review: New England Distilling Gunpowder Rye

Based in Portland, Maine, craft distillery New England Distilling is likely the easternmost distilling operation in the United States (correct me if I’m wrong). It’s a producer of several spirits, including this increasingly popular and available rye.

We’ve got more NED reviews in the works, but meanwhile take a gander at Gunpowder, reportedly “inspired by” a 150 year old “Maryland style” family recipe. Made only from local grains — just rye and 2-row barley (70% rye, 30% barley), no corn — and spending less than two years in American oak barrels, it’s a young craft rye like few others we’ve encountered.

Aptly named, Gunpowder Rye is very pungent on the nose. Loaded with notes of menthol, fresh cut grains, black and red pepper, and — dare I say — the racy essence of gunpowder, this isn’t a shy spirit. The body is brash and loaded with power. “Smooth” is a word that no one will use to describe this rye, its raw and biting character worn right on its sleeve. Gut-punching pepper, roasted grains, and flamed orange peel come across before a fiery finish grips your throat and doesn’t let go. Mercifully, at the very end, a wash of brown sugar sweetness comes across, letting you off the hook a little.

Rye often gets stereotyped as a “spicy” whiskey when in reality many ryes can be quite fruity and easygoing. This is one whiskey that lives up to the stereotype completely.

87 proof. Reviewed: Batch #4.

B+ / $39 / newenglanddistilling.com

Review: 2012 Pacific Rim Riesling and Vin de Glaciere

pacific rim riesling Review: 2012 Pacific Rim Riesling and Vin de GlaciereBased in Washington’s Columbia Valley, Pacific Rim is obsessively focused on Riesling. In fact, that’s all they make, in nearly a dozen varieties. Today we look at two of the winery’s single vineyard bottlings, both made from organic grapes.

2012 Pacific Rim Riesling Organic - Not your typical, high-acid, new world Riesling! Initially quite sweet, this honeyed wine reveals layers of pineapple and melon after settling down and warming up a bit. Ultimately that sugary core never quite fades, but the fruit flavors eventually meld together as a whole. B / $16

2012 Pacific Rim Riesling Vin de Glaciere Organic - A bit weedy on the nose, but all fruity sweetness on the body. Honey, fresh apples, figs, and light brown sugar. It all comes together easily, with a touch of nuttiness on the finish. A- / $16 (375ml)

rieslingrules.com

Review: 2011 Franciscan Estate Merlot and Cabernet Sauvignon

Franciscan CabSauv BottleImage 100x300 Review: 2011 Franciscan Estate Merlot and Cabernet SauvignonThe ubiquitous Franciscan’s 2011 general-release red wines are hitting the market now. Thoughts follow on the merlot and cabernet sauvignon.

2011 Franciscan Estate Merlot Napa Valley – Strongly herbal nose, unusual for merlot, with notes of root beer and licorice. The body is fruitier with currants and blackberry notes, but also adds hints of licorice, coffee, and dark chocolate. This could easily be mistaken for a journeyman Cabernet. As it stands here, it’s fine, if nothing special. B / $21

2011 Franciscan Estate Cabernet Sauvignon Napa Valley – A simple and simplistic Cab, featuring a tart and raspberry-driven core that’s wrapped up with vanilla, chocolate syrup, and essence of wood. Astringency on the finish is indicative of its youth, pointing to wine that’s a bit rustic, but filled with life. B / $28

franciscan.com

Drinkhacker Reads – 06.18.2014 – New Diageo Distillery Inching Ahead

Diageo’s new $115 million dollar distillery cleared a major hurdle yesterday, receiving approval from the Shelby (KY) planning commission to proceed with construction. However, this didn’t come without a fight, as many local residents expressed concern about environmental hazards, wildlife protection, and property values. It should also be noted that Shelby County is a “mixed” county — meaning wet within the city limits of Shelbyville, but dry around the remainder of the county. This would have an effect on Diageo’s ability to create revenue through tourism/tastings. Still no word on the distillery’s Master Distiller, but there’s talk this will be coming in short order. More on this later, no doubt. [WAVE]

More information is coming out regarding the fire that seriously injured one worker at an Oklahoma distillery last week. Twister Distillery was using a type of still which required an open flame, which was on a wooden pallet. On a forklift. [Tulsaworld]

The Spirits Business reports that five businesses have come together to form the Michigan Distillers Guild in an effort to unify and continue to grow the state’s success in the spirits world. We wish them well and hope that they partner with the Michigan Brewer’s Guild to advance things for all in Lansing. [The Spirits Business]

And finally today in science news, researchers have determined that a person’s vision quality physically deteriorates after alcohol consumption, giving new weight to the terms “beer goggles” and “blind drunk” as a way of describing inebriation. [Science 2.0]

Review: Seven Stills of San Francisco Whipnose Whiskey

Whipnose Front Small 401x1200 Review: Seven Stills of San Francisco Whipnose Whiskey

The Seven Stills of San Francisco returns with its second beer-based whiskey, this time pot-distilled from 1600 gallons of double IPA from Pacific Brewing Laboratories along with some maple sugar. The beer is then aged in new, five-gallon American oak barrels for six months before bottling.

As with Chocosmoke, this is a young and wild little whiskey. Bright amber in color, the whiskey exudes a complex arrangement of citrus, hoppy spices, menthol, mothballs, and wildflowers on the nose. The body is big and racy, its youthful grain character punched up with even more of those citrus-driven hops, vanilla syrup, and eucalyptus. Powerful and lasting, this is another whiskey that really lets its brewery roots come through. Like Chocosmoke, it’s not for the faint of heart or the delicate of tongue, and it invites endless exploration into a truly unique style of distilling.

94 proof.

A- / $40 (375ml) / sevenstillsofsf.com

Review: The Glenlivet Nadurra Oloroso

The Glenlivet Nadurra Oloroso bottle 2 525x874 Review: The Glenlivet Nadurra Oloroso

The Glenlivet Nadurra — “natural” in Gaelic — is a member of the Glenlivet’s core range of expressions, named in part because it spends its entire life in ex-bourbon casks (with no finishing), isn’t filtered or colored, and is bottled at its “natural” cask strength. Now, Nadurra is getting its first permanent line extension, with Nadurra Oloroso.

As the name implies, this whisky spends its entire life in Oloroso Sherry casks, the first major Glenlivet release in decades to be aged this way. Unlike the “regular” Nadurra, though, it is bottled without an age statement and at a somewhat lower alcohol level: 96 proof.

More Nadurras are coming, as the Glenlivet Nadurra sub-range is about to blow up. Says the company: “Each expression in The Glenlivet Nàdurra range is crafted in small batches using traditional production methods and is matured exclusively in a different cask-type, showcasing the versatility and flawless quality of The Glenlivet spirit. Unlike most modern whiskies, the range is bottled without chill-filtration, which offers the additional complexity, body, and texture of a whisky that has just been drawn from the cask.”

All that aside: Nadurra Oloroso is a considerable departure from standard Nadurra expression. The nose offers lots of grain and cereal notes — it’s clearly younger (probably much younger) than the 16 years of age on the regular Nadurra — with just a touch of orange oil and apple pie spice atop the cereal notes.

On the body, that granary character is strong, but not overpowering, with notes of sherried fruit (naturally), plus unripe banana, burnt matches, tar, and overcooked meat. What emerges from this melange is a sense that the whiskey is simultaneously too young and spent too long in sherry barrels… that perhaps a finishing was more in order with this release than a lengthy sojourn in Sherry casks. The lower proof level also leads me to believe that this whisky isn’t even bottled at cask strength — 96 proof can’t be the way it came out of the barrel — to which I have to ask: Why was this given the Nadurra name to begin with?

Weird. Discuss amongst yourselves.

96 proof. Travel retail only (for now).

B- / $75 / theglenlivet.com

Drinkhacker Reads – 06.16.2014 – Alcoscientific Research Edition

There’s a couple of problems with listicles that we’ll not get into right now (maybe later). However, Lifehacker (nice name) debunks 8 prominent alcohol myths using science as its base, and it’s worth perusing. We also highly encourage you to read the comments section afterwards, as it’s one of the rare times community contributions actually enhance the reading experience. In other science news, pregnancy tests are now going to be available in bars across Alaska free of charge in an effort to reduce fetal alcohol syndrome. [Lifehacker]

The Guardian files a report on a trend usually associated with the tobacco industry: Alcohol companies are now starting to fund charities in order to gain political influence. So far it’s a minor trend, but it will be interesting to see if this starts to become a widespread practice and how it will influence the future. [The Guardian]

To commemorate 75 years in business, Crown Royal has issued a special limited run blend (review forthcoming). Monarch will retail for about $70 and come in at 40% ABV. Elsewhere in Canadian new releases, it seems as if Alberta Rye Dark Batch is (finally) making its way to the states, with a much more energy-drink like packaging than its Canadian edition. [Hat tip to SKU for the spot on this new release]

And finally today in bourbon news, Janet Patton files updates on the restoration efforts at the Old Taylor and Old Crow distilleries for the Lexington Herald Leader, and the Today show interviews Fred Minnick and Chuck Cowdery on the supposed Bourbon shortage that’s happening in Kentucky.

Review: 2013 MacMurray Ranch Pinot Gris Russian River Valley

MacMurray Ranch R. River Valley Sonoma County Pinot Gris 750ml 85x300 Review: 2013 MacMurray Ranch Pinot Gris Russian River ValleyThis latest pinot gris from venerable affordable wine producer MacMurray Ranch comes loaded with peachy/tropical notes, but an undercurrant of vegetable character brings some clouds to an otherwise sunny day. The body features more of the same — perhaps apricot jam, plus fresh herbs, vanilla extract, and some baking spice — with just of a touch of chalkiness and astringency on the finish.

B+ / $20 / macmurrayranch.com

Tasting the Wines of Charles Krug, 2014

Napa’s Charles Krug — now managed by the Peter Mondavi family — is an icon of California. Krug (the man) was a Prussian journalist who emigrated to the San Francisco area in the 1840s and eventually started dabbling in winemaking before opening his first winery in 1861.

In 2011 his namesake company marked its 150th vintage. And the company is still expanding, launching its inaugural vintage of a new Howell Mountain Cabernet, reviewed below. With a focus on “old world” wine stylings, it’s the oldest winery in Napa and the home of arguably the oldest winemaker in the country: Peter Mondavi, Sr., who turns 100 this year.

Thoughts on four upcoming wines, a 2013 white and three big reds from the 2011 vintage, all tasted online with Peter Mondavi, Jr. and winemaker Stacy Clark both in attendance,  follow.

2013 Charles Krug Estate Sauvignon Blanc Limited Release - Only the third vintage of this wine, which is not the same as its general release. (The easy way to tell the difference is this one comes in a Burgundy-style bottle; the general release comes in a Bordeaux-style bottle. The Limited Edition is also twice the price.) Heavily acidic and tart, with intense grapefruit and lemon notes, this is classic Sauvignon Blanc with an extreme level of intensity. Long, biting finish. A- / $35

2011 Charles Krug Merlot Napa Valley – 84% Merlot, 8% Cabernet Sauvignon, 4% Petite Sirah, 2% Malbec, 1% Petit Verdot. Some interesting layers of coffee bean, licorice, vanilla, and cinnamon in this one, with a fragrant, coffeehouse nose. The body is lacking in presence, unfortunately, which dulls the fruit and the finish. B / $25

2011 Charles Krug Family Reserve “Generations” Napa Valley – 87% Cabernet Sauvignon, 6% Petit Verdot, 4% Malbec, 3% Merlot. Beautifully floral nose on this, violets and an undercurrent of brambly blackberries. The body is driven as much by cigar box, licorice, and some rocky soil notes as it is that blackberry core. A quiet wine (at 13.9% abv) that still exudes lots of character. A- / $50

2011 Charles Krug Family Reserve Cabernet Sauvignon Howell Mountain Napa Valley – The inaugural release of this wine, a blend of 95% Cabernet Sauvignon, 3% Petit Verdot, and 2% Malbec. Bigger, bolder, and racier… and yet just 13.7% abv. A chewier mouthfeel leads to notes of mint, chocolate bars, almonds, and vanilla cream. The fruit is somewhat understated — more plum than currants — with a rounded finish. Fun wine, and a bit atypical of what you see on Howell Mountain in general. A- / $75

charleskrug.com

Review: Cruzan Peach Rum

cruzan peach 116x300 Review: Cruzan Peach RumFruit-flavored rum day continues with this latest release from Cruzan, which clocks in at a mere 42 proof (about the same as a fortified wine).

The St. Croix-based rum operation infuses natural peach flavor into white rum (and lots of water, it seems) to create this light-as-a-feather, gently flavored spirit. Unlike the fruit bomb of Bacardi Mango Fusion, reviewed earlier today, Cruzan Peach is built with restraint in mind.

The nose is more of an apricot-cherry mix than peach, but either way it’s mild and indistinct. The body has clearer peach notes, more canned than fresh, but completely harmless through and through. The body is so light and airy it almost feels like you’re drinking a wine cooler that’s gone flat. The finish is minimal — lightly sweet and unfocused – fading away before you can figure out what you just drank.

B / $15 / cruzanrum.com

Review: Bacardi Mango Fusion

Bacardi Mango Fusion Bottle 110x300 Review: Bacardi Mango FusionFusion, you say? Turns out all you need are mangos and oranges and they fuse together to power your car.

Ahem, well, Bacardi’s latest flavored rum is this, “Mango fused with Orange” and bottled at 70 proof.

The nose of this concoction lands in a weird zone among tropical, citrus, and cough syrup, sharp and indistinct, but impossibly fruity. The body is a bit more merciful. Initially quite mild, it soon punches you with that same trio of flavors. Lots going on, but it’s the oily orange marmalade character that spreads itself on the thickest. The finish is sweet as candy, the only real indication that this is rum, not vodka. Fair enough as a mixer if you’ve got a sweet tooth.

B- / $12 / bacardi.com

Review: Firemans Brew Blonde Beer, Brunette Beer, and Redhead Ale

FB 3bottles.dry  525x645 Review: Firemans Brew Blonde Beer, Brunette Beer, and Redhead Ale

We last encountered Firemans Brew five long years ago — we mistakenly gave them an unattributed apostrophe back then — so with summer upon us, a fresh look is in order. The company still makes three hair-color-themed beers, though the “Brewnette” has been reformulated with a newish name (a straightforward “Brunette”) and less alcohol.

Fresh thoughts on the So-Cal based “The Original Firemans Brew” follow.

Firemans Brew Blonde Beer – A classic pilsner lager. A big body elevates this over your typical “baseball game” brew, with a chewy, sourdough bread core studded with a touch of pine and a hint of brown sugar. Some caramel notes emerge on the finish, but mostly it’s a crisp and clean slugger from start to finish. 5% abv. A-

Firemans Brew Brunette Beer – A burly double bock, with considerably more alcohol than the other brews in this lineup. Lots of malt on this one builds up layered notes of coffee, chocolate, and chicory, atop a sultry, creamy base. Built for fans of bigger bodied brews. 8% abv. B+

Firemans Brew Redhead Ale – A red amber ale that will offend no one, this malty, woodsy beer is built with a moderate body and a chewy, almost nutty character on the palate. The finish comes along with strong notes of fresh-baked bread and a touch of fresh coffee notes. Harmless. 5.5% abv. B

firemansbrew.com

Review: Pinot Blancs from Kuentz-Bas and Elena Walch

alsace kuentz bas 130x300 Review: Pinot Blancs from Kuentz Bas and Elena WalchJust in time for summer come these two white wines from two different regions in western Europe — one northern Italy, one eastern France. Both are made from the Pinot Blanc (aka Pinot Bianco) grape, and side by side they show just how incredibly different these wines can be. Thoughts follow.

2011 Kuentz-Bas Pinot Blanc Tradition Alsace – Simple and fresh, this wine offers a floral nose, with hints of nuts and a touch of forest floor. The body, however, is quite fruit-forward, moderately acidic with notes of lemon, lime, and touches of melon. Clean and simple finish, seasonally perfect, and drinking beautifully at the tender age of three. A- / $15

2013 Elena Walch Pinot Bianco Alto Adige – Much more lemony than the Kuentz-Bas, almost to a fault. The nose on this wine is vividly acidic, almost metallic, and the body is even more so, offering raw lemon juice character backed up by the essence of aluminum cans. Weak finish. C+ / $13

The Drinkhacker Shopping List – 06.13.2014

Hello and welcome again to the Drinkhacker Shopping List, our semi-regular list of the best and worst of what we’ve reviewed over the last several weeks. This edition finds us incredibly beer and wine heavy, ideal for those outdoor dinner parties and relaxing summer moments when the days are long and the drinks are (hopefully) properly served. Enjoy!

TheList061314 525x1179 The Drinkhacker Shopping List – 06.13.2014

Recipe: Father’s Day Cocktails 2014

On Father’s Day, most dads are just perfectly content with a glass of their favorite spirit, a can of their favorite beer or a glass of their favorite vintage. However, there are some fathers whose palate run a bit more refined. Here are a few recipes which show a bit more effort than just another tie or poorly designed ashtray.

image001 199x300 Recipe: Fathers Day Cocktails 2014Tart Daddy
1 part UV Vodka
3 parts grapefruit juice
1 dash of sour mix
Mix and serve over ice in a lowball glass.

Basil Hayden’s Dad’s Day Off
(Created by Zachary Brian Taylor, San Francisco)
1 ½ parts Basil Hayden’s bourbon
¾ parts Lemon Juice
½ part brown sugar syrup
1 sprig of Rosemary
Ginger Beer

Combine Basil Hayden’s Bourbon, lemon juice and brown sugar syrup into a cocktail shaker. Remove rosemary needles from the bottom 3/4 of the sprig and add to the shaker. Save the top of the sprig for use as a garnish. Add ice to shaker and shake. Double strain into a Collins glass filled with ice. Top with ginger beer. Garnish with the remaining rosemary sprig.

(Note: Didn’t have any Basil Hayden’s in the house, but tried this with Knob Creek Single Barrel and it worked just fine.)

image009 300x200 Recipe: Fathers Day Cocktails 2014Endless Days
1 ½ oz. Ketel One Oranje
1 oz. Aperol
½ oz. fresh orange juice
½ oz. fresh lemon juice
½ oz. simple syrup
3-4 dashes rhubarb bitters
Club soda

Combine first six ingredients in a mixing glass. Shake with ice and strain into a Collins glass filled with ice. Top with club soda. Garnish with a long orange twist.

Review: Woody Creek Colorado 100% Potato Vodka

woody creek Vodka Bottle Single One 525x787 Review: Woody Creek Colorado 100% Potato Vodka

According to Woody Creek Distillers, it’s the only company in the U.S. that “controls every element of its 100% potato vodka production.” Woody Creek grows its own potatoes (Rio Grande russet, Chepita and Lady Claire varieties) on its own Colorado farms, processes them, and distills them into vodka. Unlike so many other “distilled 80 times” spirits, Woody Creek is distilled just once, in a custom column still. Local water from the Aspen area is used to bring it down to proof for bottling.

Despite the fascinating story, Woody Creek doesn’t reinvent the wheel — which is not a bad thing. The nose is indistinct, adding a slight earthy element to the hospital character base. The body is modest in texture, the astringency of the alcohol balanced by notes of marshmallow, vanilla wafer, mandarin oranges, and marzipan. Some slight red pepper notes on the finish, but on the whole, there’s very little in the heat department throughout the spirit.

All in all, it’s a unique vodka with a traditional makeup and a classic appeal that both straight sippers and cocktail hackers will amply appreciate.

A- / $37 / woodycreekdistillers.com

Review: Ty Ku Silver, Black, and Coconut Sake

TY KU Premium Sake Collection Pack 525x367 Review: Ty Ku Silver, Black, and Coconut Sake

One of the bigger names in imported sakes (in addition to a panoply of other spirits like soju and other Asian-inspired liquors), Ty Ku hails from Nara, Japan, where it’s produced in iconic, triangular-base bottles.

Ty Ku produces four sakes (one flavored). Only the white bottling (Ty Ku’s highest-level sake) is not reviewed here. The three bottlings below are also available in a gift pack (pictured) of three 330ml bottles ($39).

Thoughts follow. (Prices are for individual 720ml bottles.)

Ty Ku Sake Junmai (Silver) - Slightly brooding on the nose, with more of a winter squash character to it. Modest honeydew notes emerge on the body, with a very gentle sweetness to it. Initially a touch jarring, it grows on you over time. Drink very cold. B- / $16

Ty Ku Sake Junmai Ginjo (Black) – Gentler, with notes of melon and coconut on the nose. More fruit, with cantaloupe and some pear character, emerges on the palate.  Quite fresh, it’s a classic, if simple, junmai ginjo. B+ / $22

Ty Ku Coconut Sake – A nigori (cloudy) sake produced at junmai quality and flavored with, of course, coconut. Pina colada on the nose, but tempered with melon notes on the body. It’s sweet, but not as sweet as you might expect, with the coconut notes coming off as rich and filling. The finish, however, gets a little mouth-coating after awhile, leaving one running for the water. C+ / $13

trytyku.com

Review: Deschutes Brewery Pine Mountain, Armory, & Cinder Cone Beers

deschutes armory 525x375 Review: Deschutes Brewery Pine Mountain, Armory, & Cinder Cone Beers

Three new brews from Bend, Oregon-based Deschutes are hitting the market — all three on a year-round basis.

Deschutes Brewery Pine Mountain Pilsner – A surprisingly malty pilsner, Pine Mountain has a big, bready body, with notes of peanuts, peaches, banana, and honey. The finish takes on an earthy, somewhat mushroomy character. There’s fruit here — those peaches are stronger than you might expect — but the heavy maltiness dulls this beer’s crisp finish a bit. 5.2% abv. B+

Deschutes Brewery Armory XPA – “Experimental Pale Ale,” made with five kinds of hops. Initially woodsy and piney, as it warms up it reveals a surprisingly sweet and orangey character, almost like citrus jellies on the finish. There’s good balance between the two, but the sweetness becomes a little wearisome after a pint or so. 5.9% abv. B+

Deschutes Brewery Cinder Cone Red Ale – A traditional red ale, this dark brew offers tons of richness, including notes from the forest, brown/burnt sugar notes, and plenty of bitter root character, particularly on the finish. A bit muddy, even chalky, this drinks like a burlier winter brew. Named after rocky lava formations… makes sense. 5.3% abv. B

each $4 per 22 oz. bottle / deschutesbrewery.com