Review: Charbay Blood Orange Vodka

charbay 8in72dpi_BloodOrange_AloneCharbay says it takes six months to infuse the flavor into this golden-orange-colored vodka, which is distilled from American corn and rye, then flavored with 100% California-grown blood oranges.

The nose and body of this vodka both veer more toward tangerine than classic blood orange, which has a bracing bitterness to it. On the nose particularly I get notes of vanilla, almonds, and then a slightly mushroomy, vegetal character that builds as the spirit gets some air.

This vodka starts off just right for a citrus-focused spirit, but over time in glass it develops a funk that just doesn’t feel right. The finish takes on distinct notes of Madeira and sherry — which are a bit at odds with the bracing citrus character that would work more effectively here.

80 proof.

B- / $29 / charbay.com

Here’s How To Make 20 Year Old Rum in One Week!

My piece on Bryan Davis and Lost Spirits just hit Wired this morning. Check it out!

Davis has come up with a method of producing spirits that taste like they’ve been aging in the barrel for 20 years, but his process only takes six days. Davis doesn’t accelerate the aging process like so many of the methods that have been tried in the past. Rather, he shortcuts it by taking new distillate and running it through his proprietary chemical reactor. Davis’s device forces the creation of the same key chemical compounds that give a well-aged spirit its unique character. Give him a week, and Davis says he can create a booze that tastes decades old.

Review: Vodka Mariette

vodka marietteMade in Bordeaux, Vodka Mariette is as striking on the palate as it is in the body. How’s it made? Not unlike many a vodka on the market today. To wit:

Vodka Mariette is distilled 5x in Bordeaux using only French, GMO-free whole wheat and water from the Ambes Spring. Volcanic rock from the Eocene Era coats the floor of this spring and deionizes the water.

The Eocene Era, people!

Mariette is a bright and clean vodka, one of the most pristine I’ve had in quite awhile. On the nose — there’s almost nothing. Light medicinal notes, light citrus, and just a touch of butterscotch. On the palate, again it’s very clean with just a bit of sweet cream on the body. From there, a little vanilla and a hint of lime zest are really the only notes that manage to push through an otherwise shockingly neutral experience. Those looking for a racy Old World vodka won’t care for it, but fans of a crystalline and pure vodka will have trouble finding anything more worthwhile.

And it looks like a pepper mill. What’s not to like?

Three flavored expressions (not reviewed here) are also available.

80 proof.

A / $30 / vodkamariette.com

Review: Chivas Regal Extra

Chivas Extra

Chivas? Yes, Chivas! And the brand is back with its first new blend in the U.S. in eight years: Chivas Extra.

Extra is made from Chivas’s collection of traditional malts and grain whiskies — including Strathisla single malt — that is finished in Oloroso sherry casks. The resulting spirit, positioned as a step up from the $25 Chivas 12 Year Old, is a surprisingly fun expression of Chivas Regal, distancing itself from the brand’s austere image through the use of the wine barrel finishing. (That said, Extra is bottled with no age statement.)

On the nose, it’s a bit hard to parse at first: It’s woody, with notes of brown butter, baked apples, tangerines, graham crackers, a little Mexican chocolate, and ample malt. The nose ultimately congeals all of this into a bit more cohesive experience, starting with huge cereal notes then layering on notes of sugary tinned fruit, (very) ripe banana, sandalwood, and a bit of cinnamon. The body isn’t heavy or oily, but it does have a chewiness that gives it an interesting grip on the palate. All told, it’s a solid blend, and something worth sipping on at least once if for no other reason than to remind yourself that Chivas is still hard at work.

Available now in major U.S. metros. Expanding to the rest of the U.S. later this year.

80 proof.

B+ / $40 / chivas.com

Review: 2009 Dow’s Late Bottled Vintage Porto

Dows LBV 2009With this 2009, Dow has crafted an affordable late bottled vintage port that’s perfectly quaffable right from the gate. Pure raisins on the nose, with just a touch of baking spice — particularly cloves — laced in. On the tongue, there’s pure dried berries, some caramel and chocolate sauce, and a strawberry glaze. It’s lacking the brooding depth of a vintage port, but that’s kind of the point, isn’t it? A terrific value.

A- / $24 / dows-port.com

2015 Whisky Extravaganza Dates Announced — Get 10% Off

We’ve had a great time at The Whisky Extravaganza over the years — though we haven’t been recently since it hasn’t landed in San Francisco for a few years.

Nonetheless we’re still fans and recommend you become one as well. This year’s events are scheduled, starting later this month in Houston, Texas. Want to go there, or to any of the other eight cities the event is going to hit? Use promo code EXTD2015 and you’ll get 10 percent off the price of a ticket.

Find out more and buy your tickets at thewhiskyextravaganza.com!

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Review: Old Overholt Straight Rye Whiskey

old overholtOld Overholt’s been making rye since well before rye was cool. Part of the Beam Suntory empire, the brand claims heritage back to 1810 and was reputedly the whiskey of choice of Doc Holliday himself.

Old Overholt is commonly used as a mixer — and is a frequent denizen of the Sazerac cocktail — but let’s take a look at how well it stands on its own two feet. While there is no official production information available (including the mashbill), some say Overholt’s trimmed its barrel time down to 4 years while simultaneously raising prices.

True or not, as of 2015 Old Overholt drinks a lot like a young, rye-heavy, mainstream bourbon. On the nose, menthol notes and some hints of leather and cloves. The body is lightly sweet, heavy on notes of cinnamon and clove, bitter roots, and some simple, sawdusty wood character. Sampled neat, Old Overholt drinks as a simple spirit, light on the tongue, a bit bitter, and with a touch of red pepper on the finish. Pleasant and cordial enough, but best as a mixer, where, true to form, it proves quite versatile.

80 proof.

B / $17 / beamsuntory.com

Review: Stranahan’s Colorado Whiskey Batch #121

Stranahan's Bottle ShotIt has been many years since we visited Stranahan’s Colorado Whiskey in a formal capacity. Batch #33, in fact, back in 2009.

Since then, Stranahan’s has become a bona-fide phenomenon, one of the stalwarts of craft whiskeymaking and the recipient of a cult following. Today we look at the 121st batch of Stranahan’s — still 100% Rocky Mountain barley and local water, aged two-plus years in new barrels, and bottled in batches made from 10 to 20 barrels a pop, which makes it more different with each bottling than the typical whiskey.

Stranahan’s has always had a certain soul and its own raison d’etre, and that is one that resonates with intense oak, old prunes, lumberyard notes, and an almost funky, mushroomy cereal character. Stranahan’s is a gut punch, and depending on your mood that day it can be a welcome friend or an angry enemy. Re-tasting Batch #33 reveals a brooding spirit that still rests on its grainy base but which is tempered by some citrus notes, a little baking spice, and some gingerbread.

In contrast, Batch #121 comes across as more youthful in the selected barrels — the grain overpowering the secondary elements singlehandedly. Here the whiskey is enveloped in that mushroom funk, featuring some austere, winey elements ultimately giving it some astringency. The notes of fermented bean curd are weird, but not out of bounds for a whiskey as generally as strange as Stranahan’s, but the lack of any real fruit or spice element in this batch makes it a tougher slog than it ought to be. I’ll say one thing: Stranahan’s is such a unique whiskey that none of this should come as a surprise. Batch #122 probably tastes nothing like it.

B / $60 / stranahans.com

Review: 2013 Vineyard 29 Cru Pinot Noir and Sauvignon Blanc

wn-web-image-cru-sb-2013A pair of new wines from Vineyard 29 under the “Cru” label, one a Napa Sauvignon Blanc from V29’s backyard, the other a pinot brought in from Oregon’s Willamette Valley. Both are excellent. Thoughts, as always, follow.

2013 Vineyard 29 Cru Pinot Noir Willamette Valley – Initially this comes across as a slightly tough pinot, with a root-laden/woody edge on the nose. On the palate, there’s lots of cherry fruit up front, then lingering notes of licorice, fruit tea, and a touch of lychee. Ultimately the wine comes together quite well, offering a rounded balance, bold flavors on the body, and a cohesive finish. A- / $54

2013 Vineyard 29 Cru Sauvignon Blanc Napa Valley – Tons of fruit here, with citrus and apple notes dueling it out with coconut and vanilla. Crisp and acidic on the finish, this little delight uses its rich palate to suck you in, then spits you out clean with mineral notes and a hint of flowers. A- / $54

vineyard29.com

Review: SomruS Indian Cream Liqueur

somrusSomPriya is a curious company. The organization has an app for finding Indian restaurants and it makes an alcoholic beverage with one capital letter too many. SomruS is “the original Indian cream liqueur,” made in Chicago from Wisconsin dairy cream, Caribbean rum, and natural flavors that include cardamom, pistachios, saffron, almonds, and rose petals.

The balsa-wood colored liqueur is a different animal than any other cream liqueur on the market, including others in this wheelhouse, like Voyant Chai Cream Liqueur. One whiff of the nose and the rose element becomes extremely clear. The cardamom and pistachios contribute some vague Asian-ness to the nose, but the floral character is what’s wholly unavoidable. On the palate, this evolves into an intense perfume character, muddling the rose petals with notes of strawberry, jellybeans, marzipan, and Turkish delight.

It’s a funky product, but the finish is so heavy with that flowery perfume it’s like stepping back in time to another era. That finish sticks with you for a long time, too — and it gets a bit too familiar, if you ask me.

27 proof.

C+ / $28 / somrus.com