Review: Journeyman Distillery Craft Whiskeys: Silver Cross, Ravenswood Rye, Featherstone Bourbon

With over a dozen spirits on offer, Three Oaks, Michigan-based Journeyman Distillery has a specific focus on craft whiskeys, bottling six expressions of the stuff in its permanent lineup. Here we review three — all young and punchy, and all worth sampling at least once.

Thoughts follow.

Silver sq 130x300 Review: Journeyman Distillery Craft Whiskeys: Silver Cross, Ravenswood Rye, Featherstone BourbonJourneyman Distillery Silver Cross Whiskey – Made from a mash of equal parts rye, wheat, corn, and barley. No age statement. The nose is youthful and grain-focused, with citrus notes and some sea salt character along with touches of menthol. The body, as you might expect, has a ton going on. Alongside some surprisingly supple grains, I get notes of chocolate caramels, butterscotch, and Bit-O-Honey. It’s a rustic liquid dessert all the way — unusual for a young craft whiskey. A drop or two of water goes a long way toward smoothing out its rough edges and coaxing the sweetness forward. 1% of proceeds from the sale of this product go to a local golf-oriented charity. 90 proof. A- / $50


Journeyman Distillery Ravenswood Rye
– An organic blend of Minnesota rye and Michigan wheat, aged in 15 gallon barrels. No age statement. Notes of licorice and phenol on the nose, settling into an intense herbal character. The body is racy and on par with craft expectations: Very young, punchy, and heavy on granary notes. Give it some time, though. As with Silver Cross, notes of chocolate and caramel emerge, along with touches of orange peel, quinine, and a touch of Bing cherries. Less enticing than the Silver Cross (though, againFeatherbone 750 130x300 Review: Journeyman Distillery Craft Whiskeys: Silver Cross, Ravenswood Rye, Featherstone Bourbon, water is of benefit here), but a solid effort. Reviewed: Batch #29, bottle #50. 90 proof. B / $50

Journeyman Distillery Featherbone Bourbon – Named for the Featherbone Factory, a Prohibition-era factory that made buggy whips and corsets and in which Journeyman is now based. Made of midwest organic corn, Michigan wheat, a little rye, and malted barley. Noage information offered. Credible craft bourbon here. It’s frontier style stuff, with a grainy, rustic attack, but the body settles down to reveal lots of vanilla, milk chocolate, and a touch of hazelnut. As with the Silver Cross, Featherbone eschews fruit in favor of dessert, which isn’t necessarily a bad thing. 90 proof. B+ / $45

journeymandistillery.com

Review: Master’s Selection London Dry Gin

MASTERS FRONT Review: Masters Selection London Dry Gin

You don’t have to make London Dry Gin in London, England. Turns out you don’t have to make it in Great Britain at all. Case in point: Master’s Selection London Dry Gin, which is made in Barcelona, Spain by a family-owned distillery that dates back to 1835.

Process-wise Master’s is a bit unique: Grain alcohol is redistilled in a pot still with Spanish estate-grown juniper, Spanish coriander, and Guatemalan cardamom. After this round, three separate macerations of Spanish citrus are introduced: sweet orange from Valencia, bitter orange from Seville, and lemons from Seville. Each of these macerations is rested separately for a full year being blended together and distilled again. At last, the juniper-coriander-cardamom distillate is blended with the citrus distillate and bottled in a cobalt blue (and, tragically, plastic-looking-but-actually-glass) decanter.

With all that talk of oranges, Master’s better pack some citrus power, and sure enough it does. In fact, there’s so much of it here you might mistake it for a citrus vodka instead of a gin. There’s ample sweetness here; rather than using just the peel as is traditional in gin, Master’s includes whole fruit, and some of that juiciness has found its way into the finished product. That’s not a complaint, and the citrus is well complemented here by the comparably modest juniper and coriander notes.

Ultimately and despite the convoluted production process, this is a perfectly drinkable but far from complex gin. Citrus, then juniper, then a dusting of Asian spice… that’s really about it. This isn’t a big martini gin (or much of a London Dry for that matter), but it’ll work with fruitier cocktails — or even sub in for orange-flavored vodka. Price is right, too.

87.8 proof.

B / $20 / mastersdrygin.com

Drinkhacker Reads – 08.07.2014 – Boycotts and Bourbon Edition

Just days after declaring that Kentucky Gentlemen are no longer welcome within borders of his empire, Russian hockey superstar/project manager/mega dictator Vladimir Putin is now introducing a series of bans on imported foods and goods. How great of an impact this will have on America’s agricultural industry has yet to be fully ascertained, but experts agree it will have some significance. Amusingly, wine is still an acceptable import (for now). Will this hurt the growing American whiskey industry? Possibly, especially with demand elsewhere in the world suddenly running slightly lower vs. last year. Regardless, trade sanctions on anything never help economies and in the end no one really wins. Here’s hoping for a change of heart soon. [BBC]

A New York court has ruled that Diageo must change the name of its Johnnie Walker Explorer’s Club range of whiskies, as the brand runs too close in premise and spirit to the established Explorer’s Club of New York, which features some of humanity’s most well known adventurers as its members. Of course Diageo is disappointed by the ruling, but says it’s excited about a new product line soon to be released, Johnnie Walker MENSA. [Wall Street Journal]

The exhaustive and expansive campaign known as the Single Oak Project is starting to wind down, with the 14th batch in the series slated to be released later this month. This is the first of what will be a very heavy upcoming release schedule for Buffalo Trace, with new E.H. Taylor offerings, new editions from the experimental collection, and of course the always in-demand Antique Collection coming out within the next few months. Our review of batch 13 is up now. [Single Oak Project]

And finally today, BevNet reports that Wild Turkey is partnering with the United States Bartenders Guild (USBG) to promote an intensive course in the bourbon-making process. Behind The Barrel will be a series of events with Wild Turkey Master Distiller Jimmy Russell with the aim of providing a thoroughly educational experience and with the hopes of establishing a bourbon expert certification program in the future. Potential students can apply for the program on Wild Turkey’s website. [BevNet]

Review: Tomatin Cu Bocan Standard Edition Single Malt Scotch

Cu Bocan Bottle Image1 Review: Tomatin Cu Bocan Standard Edition Single Malt Scotch

The newly released Cu Bocan is a bit of a “second label” for Highlands-based Tomatin, with CU BOCAN in big letters up top and “Tomatin” buried at the bottom of the bottle.

There’s a good reason for this. Cu Bocan — the name refers to a purported ghost dog that haunts the nearby village — is Tomatin’s only peated expression. It makes non-peated whisky year-round, then one week a year it cooks up its spirit with peated malt. (A limited edition 1989 vintage, bottled in a black decanter and not reviewed here, was allegedly made by accident to get this whole party started.)

Anyway, those peated whisky barrels are now being turned into the ongoing Cu Bocan line, which is bottled without an age statement but which is matured in a mix of raw oak, bourbon, and sherry casks. Phenol totals about 15ppm, so ultimately the peat level is pretty light.

For all the talk of peat, the nose on Cu Bocan is surprisingly delicate and enchanting. It’s just wisps of smoke, with overtones of nougat and a clear sherry influence. The palate ramps up with incense and baking spice, gently roasted grains, and fruit notes that include peaches and apricots. The body is moderate to big — mouth-coating to a degree — and the finish is both warming and gentle. All in all this is a representative whisky of the lightly smoky Highland style and a well-rounded, balanced spirit in just about every way. It may lack the extremes of depth and flavor you get with more mature spirits, but it’s so easy to sip on that it’s difficult not to recommend.

92 proof.

A- / $53 / cu-bocan.com

Review: Woodford Reserve Master’s Collection Sonoma-Cutrer Pinot Noir Finish

008 525x393 Review: Woodford Reserve Master’s Collection Sonoma Cutrer Pinot Noir Finish

Every year, Chris Morris releases a special edition of Woodford Reserve called the Master’s Collection. This November will see the ninth release of the Master’s Collection, and yours truly was the very first person outside of Brown-Forman to sample it.

I sat down with Master Distiller Morris last night in advance of this bourbon’s formal previewing in San Francisco for a sample and chat. The appearance of Sonoma-Cutrer in the name may have tipped you off already that this is a wine barrel-finished bourbon, and that’s indeed the case. But part of the promise of the Master’s Collection is, in Morris’s own words, that Woodford will never repeat a whiskey. Every year, the company will focus on a different grain, barrel, fermentation process, aging regimen, or other facet of whiskeymaking, but once a Master’s Collection release is sold out, it’s gone.

009 300x225 Review: Woodford Reserve Master’s Collection Sonoma Cutrer Pinot Noir FinishThe second release of the Master’s Collection way back in 2007 involved a Sonoma-Cutrer Chardonnay finish, and it was a huge hit. The whiskey is now a bit of a cult favorite and sells for a pretty penny at auction. According to Morris, people still ask him regularly when he’s going to do it again… but given the restrictions of the Master’s Collection promise, the answer has always been “Never.”

Well, not quite. Now Woodford has put out a new Sonoma-Cutrer-finished whiskey, only this time Morris is using Pinot Noir barrels instead of Chardonnay to polish off the spirit.

The production process is straightforward: Fully matured, cask strength Woodford Reserve (roughly seven years old) is moved from its new oak barrel home to French oak Pinot Noir barrels, where it spends another 10 months. These barrels have seen three vintages of Sonoma-Cutrer (the winery is owned by Woodford parent Brown-Forman), so they’re about at the end of their life for wine barrels. Once the finishing is done, the final product is brought down to 90 proof (the same as standard Woodford) and bottled.

I tasted the whiskey with Morris alongside a glass of standard Woodford Reserve for comparison. And man, what an amazing spirit it is.

There’s a lot of DNA shared between these two whiskies, as well there should be. The standard Woodford offers strong notes of cherry, walnuts, and cinnamon, and the Pinot Noir finished whiskey builds on that. Butterscotch is the (surprising) initial rush, but over time – I worked my way through two glasses while Morris regaled me with tales of whiskeymaking – you pick up other notes, including dark chocolate, and fun licorice kick on the back end. The Sonoma-Cutrer bottling picks up more fruit as it aerates, while the standard bottling of Woodford sticks close to its nutty, woody core.

Amazingly balanced and so much fun to explore, this is one of the finest – if not the finest — Master’s Collection bottling I’ve encountered to date. It’s a whiskey that smartly starts with an already strong base, then builds upon it with a savvy finish. With 24,000 bottles produced (vs. 11,300 of the prior Sonoma-Cutrer bottling), you should be able to track some down if you give it a bit of effort, but you will have to wait until November before you start hounding your local liquor store.

What’s up next for these Woodford releases? Morris plays his cards close to the vest but he does reveal that this will be the last Master’s Collection release to feature a special finishing treatment for quite a while. In fact, the Master’s Collection releases have been fully planned out and are now aging in barrels which will cover the distillery’s annual releases through 2021(!) – so any finishing treatments will have to come after that… at which point Morris claims he’ll be preparing for his planned retirement in 2023. Why not start planning a Retirement Edition Bourbon now, I asked Morris. “I hadn’t thought of that,” he replied, looking off into space with a bit of a twinkle in his eye.

A / $100 / woodfordreserve.com

Review: Havana Club Rum 3 Years Old, 7 Years Old, and Seleccion de Maestros

havana club 525x350 Review: Havana Club Rum 3 Years Old, 7 Years Old, and Seleccion de Maestros

For the third time at Drinkhacker we turn our attention to Havana Club, the essential Cuban rum that many an international traveler (including myself) has come to love. Widely available overseas, Havana Club is not available in the U.S. due to trade restrictions with Cuba. Nonetheless today we turn our attention to three of Havana Club’s expressions — out of a total seven that the Havana-based distillery makes.

The reviews below are of 700ml UK-destined bottlings, and the prices are approximate representations of what you’d pay in a typical duty free shop. As a final reminder, remember that this Havana Club is the original and is completely unrelated to Bacardi’s “Havana Club,” which is made in Puerto Rico.

Havana Club Anejo 3 Anos - At 3 years old, this is the youngest of the distillery’s rums (all Havana Club is at least “anejo”) and the only Havana Club expression bottled in clear glass, letting you see the pale yellow (filtered) spirit within. The nose is fruity with some sharpness to it, with the exuberance and slight funk of a white rum balanced by its share of refinements. Fresh lime is the biggest fruit note here, with hints of grapefruit and blood orange coming along after. The finish is spicy and piquant, offering a touch of hogo that is quickly cleaned away. Excellent as a mixer, Havana Club says this is “made for mojitos,” and it’s easy to see why. 80 proof. B+ / $20

Havana Club Anejo 7 Anos -  The standard bearer of the Havana Club brand, 7 Anos offers a complex nose that, while clearly rum, ventures into exotic notes of polished wood, passion fruit, banana, coconut, and butterscotch. The body features tropical notes, ample vanilla caramel, cocoa powder, some smoky wood fire notes, and plenty of molasses. For kicks I compared this rum to the Italian-bought version of the same spirit (though the bottle has changed a bit) I reviewed in 2010. Very similar, indicating nothing major has changed at Havana Club in the last few years, though I get a bit more cocoa on the palate in the current bottling than the older one. Same rating. 80 proof. A / $30

Havana Club Seleccion de Maestros (pictured) – This “masters’ selection” is triple barrel aged, first in standard oak barrels, after which individual casks are selected and blended and aged further in a second set of barrels. After this round of maturation, the maestros sort through these barrels, pick their favorites, and blend them again in a third barrel, after which the rum is bottled at 90 proof. Sounds like a lot of work (and frankly, not a whole lot of information on either the wood used or the amount of time spent in it), but the results speak for themselves. The nose is intense and deep, a bit of a departure from Havana Club’s usual approachability. The nose includes light smoke, leather, nuts, and charred orange peel. On the palate, the extra alcohol is immediately noteworthy, giving the Seleccion more of a sherried character, along with notes of raisins and plums, incense, cinnamon, and tobacco. It’s a markedly different experience than the 7 Year Old expression, but of equally high quality and just as enjoyable in its own right. A / $60

havana-club.com

Drinkhacker Reads – 08.04.2014 – Bonham’s to Present Japanese Whisky Auction

For those with ample money to spend and a die hard interest in quality spirits, take note: Bonham’s is once again hosting Asia’s largest Japanese Whisky auction, with a chance to score one of the world’s rarest bottlings: a 50 year old Yamazaki. A full catalog of auction items is currently ready for perusal. So get your currency converted and ready to go for August 15th, because this is sure to be quite good fun. [The Drinks Business]

We haven’t had a celebrity endorsement of interest in quite some time. For a while it seemed as if there was one appearing at least once a week, but this one is a bit different. E-40 has been in the rap game for a long time with a reasonable amount of success, establishing a loyal fan base and with longevity most other rappers would enviously take if given the option. What makes his story so great is the second act of his career: Building a pretty successful stable of wine releases over the past two years. The Sacramento Bee goes on to call him the “Robert Mondavi of hip-hop”, but we’d like to think of him as a pretty great grape wrangler independent of his music career. [Sacramento Bee]

Elsewhere, 10 Barrel Beer is currently recalling bottles of two brands of beer due to bottles exploding. Its “Beer #1″ and appropriately-named “Swill” lines have been having fermentation problems resulting in exploding glass bottles. [King 5 News]

Forbes runs a profile piece on Buffalo Trace, the latest in a seemingly long line of articles about the distillery in the last months. Not much here that fans don’t already know, but for people just discovering the brand it may be worth a read.[Forbes]

And finally today, a sobering look at climate change, how it’s impacting wine production in Australia and Africa, and what the future holds for the industry both in terms of quality and quantity. [Quartz]

Review: New Amsterdam Orange and Pineapple Vodkas

New Amsterdam Orange 750ml JS 351x1200 Review: New Amsterdam Orange and Pineapple Vodkas

New Amsterdam’s gin and vodka lines are becoming increasingly commonplace thanks to their very low price point and upscale bottle design. These new flavors are fairly natural extensions to the line, bringing the total number of New Amsterdam flavors up to six. Intriguingly, both represent a major departure from (and improvement over) the more pungent and booze-forward notes that are characteristic of New Amsterdam’s recent attempts at flavored vodka, upon which I’ve remarked in the past.

Thoughts follow. Both are 70 proof.

New Amsterdam Orange Vodka - Fresh and juicy on the nose, but sweet to the point of being almost candylike. Tangerine notes emerge with time, the overall impact being very sweet and uncomplicated. Looking for some high-test orange zest to add to your cocktail? New Amsterdam Orange will get the job done without making things complicated. This isn’t a complex spirit nor is it anything like biting into an actual piece of fruit, but it’s a considerably more drinkable spirit than the lemon-focused New Amsterdam Citron, for example. B+ 

New Amsterdam Pineapple Vodka – Again with the candy, but this vodka is stuffed with tropical notes — not just pineapple but coconut and maybe some guava, too. So sweet and powerful with candylike fruit notes, it’s like drinking a cheap but functional beach cocktail straight from the spigot. Again, New Amsterdam has dialed back that alcoholic funkiness by pushing the sugar content to epic highs, and it’s an approach that has its merits. I hate to be one to encourage such shortcutting, but drop a little of this into a blender with some Coco Lopez and some ice and you’ve got a credible and super cheap Pina Faux-lada without ever having to crack into a can of pineapple juice. Sophisticates can safely snub it, but your mom will eat it up. B+

both $13 / newamsterdamspirits.com

Tasting Report: Pinot Days 2014

Pinot Days 2014 is now behind us, and as usual it offered some of the best Pinot Noirs (and a few Chardonnays) from all over California and Oregon. There was plenty to love at this show, particularly wines from the always-enchanting Sojourn and Dutton-Goldfield, but I also made a huge discovery in the form of Belden Barns, a brand new label from Sonoma that was only now making its public debut. Keep an eye out for this rising star!

Thoughts on all wines tasted follow. Prices are noted where they were available.

Tasting Report: Pinot Days 2014

2011 Waits-Mast Pinot Noir, Wentzel Vineyard, Anderson Valley / $45 / B+ / tart, quite herbal
2011 Waits-Mast Pinot Noir, Mendocino County / $34 / B+ / lots of cherry, tart, mineral edge
2012 Waits-Mast Pinot Noir, Nash Mill Vineyard, Anderson Valley / $40 / A- / silky and balanced, bursting with fruit
2012 La Follette Pinot Noir Sangiacomo Vineyard Sonoma Coast / A- / silky and modest, pretty, quiet
2011 La Follette Pinot Noir van der Kamp Vineyard Sonoma Mountain / B+ / lush, roaste meat notes, smoky edge
2011 La Follette Pinot Noir DuNah Vineyard Russian River Valley / A- / citrusy, sweet and sour sauce notes
2012 La Follette Chardonnay Sangiacomo Vineyard Sonoma Coast / A- / big tropical notes, caramel
2012 Sojourn Pinot Noir Sangiacomo Vineyard Sonoma Coast / $54 / A- / intense cherry, strawberry; grows as finish builds
2012 Sojourn Pinot Noir Gap’s Crown Vineyard Sonoma Coast / $54 / A / rich and full of cocoa and raspberry notes; a favorite
2012 Sojourn Pinot Noir Ridgetop Vineyard Sonoma Coast / $59 / A- / orange peel and herbal notes, dense with evergreen and cherry tones
2012 Ca’Nani a Del Dotto Pinot Noir / B+ / very big body, strawberry notes
2009 Del Dotto Pinot Noir Cinghale Vineyard Sonoma Coast / B / massive herbs and grassy nots, lots of oak
2011 Gary Farrell Pinot Noir Russian River Valley Russian River Selection / B+ / high acid, focused on fruit
2012 Gary Farrell Pinot Noir Halberg Vineyard Russian River Valley / B / heavy tartness, herbal character
2012 Gary Farrell Pinot Noir Halberg Vineyard Russian River Valley Dijon Clones / B- / similar, more vegetal
2011 Sokol Blosser Pinot Noir Dundee Hills / C / something’s off here; big barnyard nose, funky flavors
2011 Sokol Blosser Pinot Noir Dundee Hills Estate Cuvee / C+ / light barnyard, lots of wet earth
2012 Cornerstone Cellars Stepping Stone Chardonnay Artist Label Oregon / $30 / A- / a surprising winner, rich and creamy, with lots of fresh fruit
2011 Cornerstone Cellars Pinot Noir Willamette Valley / $50 / B+ / a bit tough now, give this one a year or two
2011 Clos Saron Pinot Noir “Home Vineyard” / $60 / B / herbal, mushroom, restrained
2011 Clos Saron Pinot Noir “Lower Block” / $65 / B / similar, quite tart
2011 Clos Saron Pinot Noir “Old Block” / $75 / B / slightly edgier, with bigger mushroom notes
2005 Clos Saron Pinot Noir “Texas Hill Road Vineyard” / B+ / hanging on, with grilled meats and anise notes
2001 Clos Saron Pinot Noir “Home Vineyard” / B- / showing some VA, but still has a core of fruit
2012 Belden Barns Serendipity Block Pinot Noir / $48 / A / rich, with robust chocolate notes — first public showing of this new Sonoma Mountain winery
2012 Belden Barns Estate Pinot Noir / $38 / A- / good balance, fruit and chocolate, but restrained composition
2012 Belle Glos Pinot Noir Clark & Telephone Vineyard Santa Maria Valley / A- / baking spices and lively fruit showing up here
2012 Belle Glos Pinot Noir Las Alturas Vineyard Santa Lucia Highlands / A- / similar, better balance
2012 Belle Glos Pinot Noir Dairyman Vineyard Russian River Valley / B+ / on the tart side; lively fruit
2012 Dutton-Goldfield Winery Pinot Noir Azaya Ranch Vineyard Marin County / $58 / A- / big body, lots of fruit and spice
2012 Dutton-Goldfield Winery Pinot Noir Devil’s Gulch Vineyard Marin County / $58 / A- / lots of fruit again, tart edge, slight chocolate character
2012 Dutton-Goldfield Winery Pinot Noir Dutton Ranch-Fox Den Vineyard Green Valley / $58 / A- / similar character, ample fruit, some vanilla
2012 Dutton-Goldfield Winery Pinot Noir Dutton Ranch-Emerald Ridge Vineyard Green Valley / $58 / A- / some menthol character, mild herbs, strawberry and cherry
2012 Dutton-Goldfield Winery Pinot Noir Angel Camp Vineyard Anderson Valley / $58 / A- / pretty, some floral notes, raspberry

Review: Beachwood/Heretic/Stone Unapologetic IPA and Stone RuinTen IPA 2014

These days, Stone Brewing Company is a juggernaut of new releases, with new brews sometimes arriving at the pace of one every couple of weeks. Here we have two of Stone’s latest, including a relaunch of one of the company’s most famed IPAs, and a three-way collaboration among some California brewing icons.

Thoughts on both follow. Get ‘em while you can!

Stone Unapologetic WEB 125x300 Review: Beachwood/Heretic/Stone Unapologetic IPA and Stone RuinTen IPA 2014Beachwood/Heretic/Stone Unapologetic IPA – This collaborative brew is from the California-based trio of Beachwood Brewing (Long Beach), Heretic Brewing (Fairfield), and Stone (Escondido). It’s a big IPA crafted with Magnum and Chinook hops, plus four new Washington-grown strains (HBC 342, Hopsteiner 06300, Azacca, and Belma), giving it a truly unique makeup (and a bit of a new flavor profile, too). The beer is a hop monster but it’s also loaded with fruit flavors. After the initial rush of bitterness dies down, look for notes of lemon and peaches, almost like a fruit custard has been blended into the classic, piney notes of the IPA. The finish is sweet and tropical, hinting at coconut milk, making for an unusual IPA that is both intensely hoppy as well as dessert-friendly. 8.8% abv. A- / $9 per 22 oz. bottle

Stone RuinTen Heroshot WEB 2014 224x300 Review: Beachwood/Heretic/Stone Unapologetic IPA and Stone RuinTen IPA 2014Stone RuinTen IPA 2014 – “A stage dive into a mosh pit of hops” is about right. This is the 2014 release of Ruination, which Stone originally launched to much fanfare in 2002 and which was released as an even hoppier version in 2012 for the 10th anniversary of the company. The recipe here is the same as the 2012 bottling; only the name has changed. (The name is intended to be suggestive of what this beer will do to your palate, given its 110 IBUs — and, at over 10% alcohol, what it will do to your mind as well, I presume.) RuinTen features ample hops (five pounds of Columbus and Centennial hops (then dry-hopped with Citra and Centennial), per barrel of brew), but presents itself with class and finesse. The nose and body are resinous with pine tree sap, bitter orange peel, and cloves. Ultra-ripe fruit comes on strong as you sip it, culminating in a somewhat malty, syrupy, and lightly smoky combination of flavors. The finish offers hints of marshmallows and canned fruits, pine trees and applesauce. All kinds of flavors going on, and firing on all cylinders. 10.8% abv. A / $8 per 22 oz. bottle

stonebrewing.com

Review: Ancho Reyes Ancho Chile Liqueur

ancho reyes 525x660 Review: Ancho Reyes Ancho Chile Liqueur

The ancho chile is a dried poblano pepper. A popular element in both traditional Mexican cuisine and upscale cooking, ancho chiles have a gentle, smoky flavor with hints of chocolate and cinnamon. I use ancho a lot in the kitchen, but never thought about how it would fare in a cocktail.

Ancho Reyes is a new liqueur made in Mexico, reportedly made from a recipe created in Puebla in 1927. You can use it as a cocktail ingredient or drink it straight as an aperitif — neat or on the rocks.

This is fun stuff. Initially it offers an amaro-like character on the nose, with a root beer and licorice character to it. Spice emerges after a few seconds, a surprisingly racy, chili pepper heat that really tickles the nostrils. The body’s full of complexity and interest, immediately filling the mouth with heat, tempering that spice with vanilla, cinnamon, and dark chocolate. Exotic notes of incense, bitter roots, and orange peel emerge over time, particularly on the finish.

This is a versatile spirit with all kinds of applications, from adding it by the drop in a margarita to drinking it by the shot glass after a hefty meal. It may sound like a niche product, but it’s got a truly surprising level of flexibility.

80 proof.

A / $33 / anchoreyes.com

The Drinkhacker Shopping List – 07.31.2014

If it’s Friday, it’s time for the Shopping List, our twice monthly look back at the best and worst we’ve reviewed on the site. This edition has a generous share of bourbons and wines from which to choose, with many earning quite high praise. We’ve also had the good fortune to review some fantastic Scotch.

TheList073114 525x1179 The Drinkhacker Shopping List   07.31.2014

Review: Ardbeg Auriverdes

ardbeg auriverdes 525x585 Review: Ardbeg Auriverdes

Earlier this summer, iconic Islay distillery Ardbeg released its annual “Ardbeg Day” limited-edition whisky release, Auriverdes. The name is from Portuguese and refers to the colors green and gold (Ardbeg’s classic color scheme) and is a nod to the Brazilian flag and the just-completed World Cup.

The whisky eschews finishes for what is a bit of a gimmicky barrel treatment: Standard American oak (ex-Bourbon) barrels are given “specially toasted lids” that were used just for Auriverdes. Considering the relatively small surface area of the lids of the barrel compared to the rest of the cask, I can’t imagine that this toasting regimen has had a significant effect on the whisky inside. Putting that aside, let’s look at the spirit within. As usual for these releases, it is bottled at cask strength and with no age statement.

Auriverdes starts off with sweet barbecue smoke on the nose, with touches of burnt orange peel, sherry, and salted caramel. The body is quite sweet — sweeter than I expected from an Ardbeg — with notes of rum raisin, creme brulee, and Madeira up front. As the whisky develops in the glass and on the tongue, you catch snippets of meaty bacon and syrup, more smoked meats (pork ribs, methinks), plus light chocolate and vanilla malt notes on the back end. The finish is long and continues to grow in sweetness, really coating the mouth and becoming increasingly warm and rounded as it develops. The only cure is the fiery bite of another sip… and we know what that leads to.

This is a completely solid Ardbeg release, and the heavy, winey notes make it seem like it has had a finishing run in some kind of fortified wine barrel, but that’s not the case. It doesn’t entirely reinvent the well-worn Ardbeg wheel, but it provides enough of a unique spin on the formula to make it worth exploring.

99.8 proof.

A- / $100 / ardbeg.com

Visiting Harpoon Brewery – Boston, Mass.

Headed to Boston? Take a little trip to Harpoon Brewery, which is now the 14th largest brewery in the U.S. but which still feels like a happy, family operation. Harpoon built a massive beer hall here in South Boston last year, which you can take in after spending 30 minutes or so strolling through the production facility and hearing a little bit about how Harpoon makes its various brews.

If you’ve been on one brewery tour you probably know what to expect, though being able to taste the barley that Harpoon uses to make its beers is a fun little touch. Of course, everyone’s favorite time is the tasting room, where you get about 20 minutes to essentially drink all the Harpoon beer you can from little 2 oz. glasses. I managed to sample a very broad selection of what was on tap that day, from the perfectly credible (and well-stocked) Harpoon IPA to the limited edition Citra Victorious Barrel Series, made exclusively with orangey Citra hops. The Leviathan Double IPA (at 10% abv) is a true monster — though maltier than you’d expect — but my ultimate favorite, by far, was Harpoon Rich & Dan’s Rye IPA, a spicy/piney beer with nice bite and good balance of fruit and hops.

Definitely recommended — and don’t miss the pretzels, which are house-made with grains used to make the company’s beers.

harpoonbrewery.com

Review: Ventisquero Grey 2012 Pinot Noir and 2011 Cabernet Sauvignon

Ventisquero NV GreyPinotNoir Bottleshot 104x300 Review: Ventisquero Grey 2012 Pinot Noir and 2011 Cabernet SauvignonWe covered the “Grey” line from Chilean producer Ventisquero late last year, and now the winery is back with two more releases, both from international varietals. Thoughts follow.

2012 Ventisquero Grey [Glacier] Pinot Noir Leyda Valley Las Terrazas Vineyard – This single block Pinot spends 12 months in French oak barrels, after which time it comes out as an earthy, intense expression of the grape. Massive mushroom and wet leather notes interplay with blackberry and cassis. It’s spicy, but with more the bite of a green pepper than anything in the herb family. Interesting structure but the balance is pushed to far into the vegetal. B / $20

2011 Ventisquero Grey [Glacier] Cabernet Sauvignon Maipo Valley Trinidad Vineyard – Grey Cabernet pops out after 18 months in oak barrels, revealing a surprisingly balanced and restrained wine. The nose is vibrant with fruit and lightly peppery, with just hints of licorice. On the palate it shows only a light dusting of tannins, with deep blackberry, tree bark, and light balsamic notes. Quite fruit-friendly, and a very good value to boot. B+ / $18

ventisquero.com

Book Review: Gentlemen Bootleggers

Gentlemen Bootleggers 350 200x300 Book Review: Gentlemen BootleggersThe recent trend of nonfiction surrounding historical events in the alcohol world is widely encouraging: It’s a field where much potential and promise for new scholarship is welcome and necessary. With a new pack of young writers establishing themselves for the long haul as historians and keepers of the flame, it is with great hope this groundswell doesn’t cease in the immediate future.

In his debut offering, journalist Bryce Bauer tells the tale of Templeton, Iowa, a community that refuted the early 20th century social structures commonly established throughout small Midwestern towns to band together and achieve success as bootleggers during Prohibition. The story centers around a wily cast of characters such as Otis P. Morganthaler, F.H. Huesmann, and Joseph Irlbeck, names which sound like they would own investment firms or a line of cookies in 2014, but here they each play a role in the town’s survival during one of the 20th century’s most tumultuous times. The whole tale seems to border on the comically absurd, and would make for one heck of a Coen brothers-crafted screenplay.

Bauer’s work is well documented and thoroughly detailed, leaving no doubt that these events really and truly happened (there are some skeptics who deny bootlegging even occurred in Iowa). But one of the best parts of Gentlemen Bootleggers is the level of engagement with which Bauer tells the story. His writing feels effortless; more like a really enjoyable conversation over several drams on a late winter’s afternoon, rather than a starchy, overly annotated tome gathering dust on a library stack. Like Fred Minnick’s Whisky Women in 2013, Gentlemen Bootleggers is a solid debut and hopefully not the last we’ve seen of Bauer on the subject of spirits.

A / $20 / [BUY IT NOW]

Recipe: Lavazza Coffee Cocktails, 2014

As I type this it’s an early Sunday morning and I’m currently hurting from a bit too much celebrating the night before. Thanks to a hyperactive child who is wired beyond reason, I am unable to sleep in. While I’m patiently waiting for my coffee to brew and some children’s show is blaring in the other room, I’m clicking through my inbox, where I found these recipes sent over from Lavazza. Right now, they’re looking pretty great. I have yet to try them, but will report back if I get the motivation and/or will to live any time soon.

Lavazza Grand Slam
1 oz. Lavazza espresso
1/2 oz. Kahlua
1 oz. Grand Marnier

Prepare in mixing glass, serve it topped with fresh cream in a Martini cocktail glass.

image001 206x300 Recipe: Lavazza Coffee Cocktails, 2014Lavazza Espresso Match Point Martini
1 oz. vodka
1/2 oz. Kahlúa
1 oz. Lavazza espresso
lightly whipped cream for topping
1 malted milk ball (instead of an olive, of course)

Fill mixing glass with ice cubes, add ingredients and stir quickly to chill, strain into a chilled Martini glass and top with layer of whipping cream and garnish with malted milk ball, if desired.

Drinkhacker Reads – 07.30.2014 – Crafty Practices Running Rampant

Is the tide finally turning? Shanken discusses a bit of a problem the vodka industry is facing right now: their flavored vodka lines just aren’t selling the way they once were. Hopefully this is a sea change for folks looking for something a bit less absurd than vodka which tastes like lawn clippings, or asphalt, or wax candles, or whatever the industry is trying to sell these days. [Shanken News Daily]

Will consumers embrace no-age statements on scotch? This is the question the Spirits Business poses in a recent article discussing recent changes to the industry. A better question to possibly ask is: will they have a choice? It seems as if this practice isn’t just for Scotch either: Bourbon is heading in the same direction as well, with a few Sazerac brands recently removing age statements from their bottles. [The Spirits Business]

The Daily Beast runs a profile piece on Lawrenceburg, Indiana’s MGP, a place where many of the “craft”/”artisan” distilleries are currently sourcing their stock. Much has been made lately of the craft debate, with some people asking for more transparency while others are asking if we’re taking this all a bit too seriously. [Follow up: Dave Lieberman from OC Weekly publishes a rebuttal to the original Daily Beast article, and the reddit majority fires up its cylinders for the day.] [The Daily Beast]

And finally today, a new study from the Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth at the Johns Hopkins and the Boston University School of Public Health has determined that underage drinkers are three times more likely to drink brands advertised on television programs they watch compared to other alcohol brands. The results help to reinforce a 2012 linking television and media identity to brand loyalty and familiarity among underaged drinkers, and another recent study linking pop music and alcohol brands. [Science Codex]

Review: Nikka Miyagikyo 10 Years Old

10year 525x700 Review: Nikka Miyagikyo 10 Years Old

Finding any sort of Japanese whisky in the middle of Kentucky seems to be a very complex chore at the least, nearly impossible at best. Limited to a scant few offerings — Hibiki, Yamazaki, and the yearly arrival of Hakushu — the choices within the Commonwealth are muted amongst a frothy sea of bourbon enthusiasts (though this may change with the Suntory acquisition of Beam, we shall see). When wanting something different beyond the traditional quartet of Bourbon, Scotch, Irish, or Canadian, the shelves offer limited options. So when a friend offers to bring back something from Japan for your shelf, it provides extra incentive for their safe (and early) return home.

The nose on Nikka’s Miyagikyo 10 Year Old expression is light and pleasant, with traces of floral and smoke elements that linger, hanging about for almost too long. It’s almost better to let it breathe a bit in the glass before beginning the whole experience. Tasting reveals mild citrus and spice with some traces of oak and pepper, a medium body that keeps the citrus lingering in the finish along with the oak.

Unlike some of the older siblings in the Nikka stable, this really doesn’t contain some of the heavy malt tones usually synonymous with the brand. On the plus side, this mild inconsistency may prove useful as an accessible entry point to the Nikka line and to Japanese whisky as a whole. Those desiring more complexity may elect to upgrade to the 12 or 15 year if the option presents itself. 80 bucks is an investment, but if Japanese whisky is your (new) game, expect to pay that and more stateside.

90 proof.

B+ / $80 / nikka.com

Recipes: 2014 Summer Cocktail Roundup

As w near the close of the summer season, we decided to publish a few cocktails worthy of consideration, but which didn’t necessarily fit into some other thematic concept.

image003 199x300 Recipes: 2014 Summer Cocktail RoundupRaspberry Ganache
2 oz. Sobieski Raspberry Vodka
2 oz. Coco Lopez Cream of Coconut
½ oz. cream
Splash of cherry juice
Rock candy and cherries for garnish

Add all ingredients into a blender with ice. Blend and pour into a tall glass. Garnish with rock candy and cherries.

Crimson Hero
(courtesy of Zachary Blair, mixologist at KANU Lounge at Whiteface Lodge, Lake Placid, New York)
3 oz Charbay Blood Orange
.5 oz Barenjager
.5 oz vermouth
Splash of lemon
Orange twist and sage leaf (for garnish)

Mix ingredients together, shake well and strain, pour over ice, add garnish and serve.

mule 188x300 Recipes: 2014 Summer Cocktail RoundupMexicue Mule
(courtesy of Mexicue Kitchen and Bar)
2 ounces bourbon
1 oz ginger syrup
1 tablespoon fresh lime juice
½ cup chilled ginger beer
Lime wedge (for garnish)

Fill tall glass with ice. Add bourbon and lime juice, then ginger beer; stir to mix. Pour into high ball. Garnish with lime wedge. (Note: Mexicue recommends Kings County bourbon, but we used Beam Double Black and it turned out just fine.)

image002 Recipes: 2014 Summer Cocktail RoundupFrozen Fairy
1 oz. Lucid Absinthe
1 oz. rum
4 oz. piña colada mix
1 oz. pineapple juice
1 oz. melon liqueur
Pineapple for garnish

In a blender add Lucid Absinthe, rum, piña colada mix, pineapple juice and ice. Blend until smooth. Pour the frozen mix in a tall glass and float the melon liqueur on top. Garnish with pineapple