Category Archives: Wine

Review: New Rioja from Zaco and Pomal

Vina Pomal Reserva NV HR 179x300 Review: New Rioja from Zaco and PomalTwo new Spanish Riojas — both quite young, a twist over the typical Rioja you’ll encounter, which can often be six to eight years old — or more — by the time they hit the shelf. How do these young guns measure up? Here we go…

2011 Vina Zaco Rioja Tempranillo – Especially young for Rioja, and it shows. Raw, almost pruny notes on the nose lead to a rather plain and unrefined body. Tar and stewy stone fruit notes are prominent, with a slightly sickly sweet finish. C- / $15

2009 Vina Pomal Rioja Reserva – Better, but still a clearly young and somewhat fruit-funky wine. Underripe fruit on the nose opens up over time, giving way to a strawberry/blueberry character laced with black tea and a touch of leather. Best with food, but fair enough on its own. B / $21

Review: NV Blandy’s Madeira Malmsey 10 Years Old

Blandys 10YR Malmsey 88x300 Review: NV Blandys Madeira Malmsey 10 Years Old A few months ago we took a deep dive into the world of Madeira, with a survey of four different grape varietals, all made by Blandy’s and all five years old. Today we look at an older version of one — Malmsey — at 10 years old. Malmsey was my favorite Madeira then and I put this 10 year old expression side by side with the younger version to see how it shaped up.

The answer: Surprisingly well. At 5 years old, Blandy’s Malmsey Madeira is still a bit funky, offering a raisiny fortified wine with touches of bittersweet chocolate and an acidic finish. At 10, the wine has matured wonderfully, bringing more of that chocolate to the forefront and imbuing it with a beautiful expression of raisin, fig, and currants. That tight, almost sour funkiness has vanished, leaving behind a sultry experience that begs for a rich cheese or a dense chocolate cake. Quite lovely.

19% abv.

A / $35 / blandys.com

Review: 2011 Sartori Ferdi Bianco Veronese IGT

Sartori Ferdi 150x300 Review: 2011 Sartori Ferdi Bianco Veronese IGTA unique white wine made entirely from garganega grapes from the Soave region of Italy. (As with the red wine Amarone, these grapes are dried before they are vinified, spending 40 days in the sun boosting their sugar levels.) The wine is partially fermented in stainless steel and partially in oak.

The wine initially offers a very muted nose. This opens up as the wine gets warmer, with honey and clear apricot notes evident. On the body, it’s surprisingly vibrant, again offering ample apricot with a slight caramel edge to it, particularly on the finish. The body is big, with floral elements that dance in and out on the tongue and in the nostrils.

B+ / $15 / banfiwines.com

Review: 2012 Martin Codax Albarino Rias Baixas

martin codax albarino 2012 wine 124x300 Review: 2012 Martin Codax Albarino Rias BaixasWidely available and incredibly affordable, Martin Codax’s 2012 Albarino from Spain’s Rias Baixas region is easy to like. Offering fresh lemon and pineapple notes, it has a modestly creamy body and a brisk acidity to the finish. A bit of vanilla adds a touch of the exotic.

A- / $12 / martincodax.com

Tasting Report: 2009 and 2010 St. Emilion Bordeaux Wines

It isn’t every day we get to experience a narrowly-focused tasting that offers only wines from a single, small region — and restricts them to just two vintages, at that. Hard, then, to pass up the opportunity to sample the 2009 and 2010 vintages of St. Emilion red Bordeaux wines — all Grand Crus — from dozens of producers in this right bank region, known for its heavy focus on Merlot.

In pitting ’09 and ’10 head to head, I found the vintages largely similar, with 2010 pulling just a bit ahead of its older sibling, thanks to generally better acidity levels in the wine. Thoughts follow on all wines tasted.

Tasting Report: 2009 and 2010 St. Emilion Bordeaux Wines

2009 Château Bellefont-Belcier Bordeaux St. Emilion/ A- / rich, with nice licorice and spice, some leather
2010 Château Bellefont-Belcier Bordeaux St. Emilion/ B+ / slightly thinner
2009 Château Chauvin Bordeaux St. Emilion/ B / needs time, significant herbal notes
2010 Château Chauvin Bordeaux St. Emilion/ B+ / more lively, lots of earth
2009 Château Clos de Sarpe Bordeaux St. Emilion/ B- / showing some oxidation
2010 Château Clos de Sarpe Bordeaux St. Emilion/ B / big raisin, high acidity and tart blueberry notes
2009 Château Corbin Bordeaux St. Emilion/ A- / more floral, with blackberry tones; an easy favorite
2010 Château Corbin Bordeaux St. Emilion/ B+ / lush and mushroomy, leather with deep wood
2009 Clos des Jacobins Bordeaux St. Emilion/ B / modest, tannic with a big finish
2010 Clos des Jacobins Bordeaux St. Emilion/ B+ / lots of depth, similar to 2009
2009 Château la Commanderie Bordeaux St. Emilion/ C- / significant barnyard notes
2010 Château la Commanderie Bordeaux St. Emilion/ C+ / quite jammy, overcooked
2009 Couvent des Jacobins Bordeaux St. Emilion/ B- / out of balance, vegetal notes
2010 Couvent des Jacobins Bordeaux St. Emilion/ B / heavy duty, big structure with lots of future promise
2009 Château Dassault Bordeaux St. Emilion/ B+ / good fruit, balanced with solid acid
2010 Château Dassault Bordeaux St. Emilion/ B+ / a curiosity, raisin character and some Port notes
2009 Château de Ferrand Bordeaux St. Emilion/ A- / well crafted, nice balance of fruit and light herbs
2010 Château de Ferrand Bordeaux St. Emilion/ A- / similar character to 2009, with a bit more acidity
2009 Château de Pressac Bordeaux St. Emilion/ B / tough, slightly weedy
2010 Château de Pressac Bordeaux St. Emilion/ B / similar, a bit thin
2009 Château Destieux Bordeaux St. Emilion/ A- / very rich, dense with chocolate and tobacco notes
2010 Château Destieux Bordeaux St. Emilion/ A- / similar structure, winning body, balanced but with depth
2009 Château Faugeres Bordeaux St. Emilion/ B / some greenness, tar notes
2010 Château Faugeres Bordeaux St. Emilion/ B- / heavy notes of herbs and wood
2009 Château Peby Faugeres Bordeaux St. Emilion/ B+ / dense, heavy tar, blackberry and cassis notes – a huge wine
2010 Château Peby Faugeres Bordeaux St. Emilion/ B+ / a bit over-sweetened, cherry notes
2009 Château Fleur Cardinale Bordeaux St. Emilion/ B / earthy, subtle and more delicate, but short on fruit
2010 Château Fleur Cardinale Bordeaux St. Emilion/ B+ / fuller and rounder, more stone fruit character
2009 Château Fombrauge Bordeaux St. Emilion/ B+ / dense fruitcake character
2010 Château Fombrauge Bordeaux St. Emilion/ B / considerable tannin, tougher, dried herbs
2009 Château Fonplegade Bordeaux St. Emilion/ B- / thin body, short on fruit
2010 Château Fonplegade Bordeaux St. Emilion/ B / tart, acidic finish, cherry cola notes
2009 Château Fonroque Bordeaux St. Emilion/ B+ / some mint, some mushroom, with an herbal finish
2010 Château Fonroque Bordeaux St. Emilion/ B+ / more balanced, crisp and tart berry notes
2009 Château Moulin du Cadet Bordeaux St. Emilion/ B / simple, easy fruit, sweet finish
2010 Château Moulin du Cadet Bordeaux St. Emilion/ B- / tobacco notes, Port character, simple and sweet finish
2009 Château Franc Mayne Bordeaux St. Emilion/ B / easy, simple fruit core
2010 Château Franc Mayne Bordeaux St. Emilion/ B / similar notes to 2009
2009 Château Grand Pontet Bordeaux St. Emilion/ B / some weediness
2010 Château Grand Pontet Bordeaux St. Emilion/ B- / somewhat unripe, tough around the edges
2009 Château Guadet Bordeaux St. Emilion/ B+ / moderate berries on the core, some stone fruit character
2010 Château Guadet Bordeaux St. Emilion/ B+ / better balance, more fruit and structure
2009 Château Jean Faure Bordeaux St. Emilion/ B+ / more powerfully structured, chewier than 2010
2010 Château Jean Faure Bordeaux St. Emilion/ A- / fruit forward, ample body with some floral notes; huge Cab Franc in blend
2009 Château la Dominique Bordeaux St. Emilion/ A- / great balance of fruit with floral notes
2010 Château la Dominique Bordeaux St. Emilion/ B+ / bigger body, licorice notes on top
2009 Château la Marzelle Bordeaux St. Emilion/ A- / lots going on, coffee notes, fresh flowers, big berry notes
2010 Château la Marzelle Bordeaux St. Emilion/ A / similar build, but with a more refreshing finish; tops!
2009 Château La Tour Figeac Bordeaux St. Emilion/ A- / licorice notes, some cocoa beans, dessert-like
2010 Château La Tour Figeac Bordeaux St. Emilion/ A- / much the same, some ginger, cocoa powder
2009 Château Laroze Bordeaux St. Emilion/ B+ / forest floor, charcoal, dense and chewy
2010 Château Laroze Bordeaux St. Emilion/ B+ / lots of tart berry notes, cranberry sauce
2009 Château Le Prieure Bordeaux St. Emilion/ B+ / some menthol on the nose, a bit thin, tobacco notes
2010 Château Le Prieure Bordeaux St. Emilion/ B+ / considerable menthol, more acid, bigger but balanced
2009 Château Yon Figeac Bordeaux St. Emilion/ C- / barnyard notes, on a thin body
2010 Château Yon Figeac Bordeaux St. Emilion/ C / similar character to 2009

Tasting Report: Ferrari-Carano and J Vineyards

A recent trip to Sonoma County took us to a pair of well-known wineries to sample their latest bottlings. Here’s a look at what’s new from Ferrari-Carano (including a number of rare dessert wines) and J Vineyards, best known for its sparkling production.

Ferrari-Carano
2011 Ferrari-Carano Pinot Noir Russian River Valley / $38 / B+ / licorice notes
2010 Ferrari-Carano Sky High Ranch Pinot Noir Mendocino Ridge / $42 / B+ / some mint, strong currant notes
2011 Ferrari-Carano Sangiovese Dry Creek Valley / $42 / B / a bit sweaty
2010 Ferrari-Carano Tresor Bordeaux Blend / $52 / B+ / slightly thin, chocolate cherry notes later
2008 Ferrari-Carano PreVail West Face Alexander Valley / $55 / A- / blueberry, dense and chewy, brownie-like; 100% cabernet sauvignon, late harvest
2007 Ferrari-Carano PreVail Back Forty Alexander Valley / $85 / B / fading, some astringency; 100% semillon (sweet)
2008 Ferrari-Carano Eldorado Gold Sonoma County (375ml) / $30 / B / orange honey notes, some Christmas cake, a bit thin; 100% black muscat (sweet)

J Vineyards
2012 J Vineyards Vin Gris Russian River Valley / $20 / B / some vegetal character, dry, floral finish
2012 J Vineyards Chardonnay Russian River Valley / $28 / B+ / buttery nose, lots of nuts, vanilla, fresh cookies
2012 J Vineyards Pinot Noir Russian River Valley / $37 / A- / cherry, raspberry, coffee notes, some chocolate
2012 J Vineyards Misterra Pinot Noir Russian River Valley / $50 / A / 6% pinot meunier, 4% pinotage; fruitier, more dense and intense; big blucberry notes, with better structure
NV J Vineyards J Cuvee 20 Brut Russian River Valley / $28 / A- / clean, apple and apricot, some nuttiness, well-balanced, tight finish

Review: 2008 Banfi Brunello di Montelcino

CB Brunello di Montalcino 86x300 Review: 2008 Banfi Brunello di MontelcinoCastello Banfi’s newest vintage in its Brunello di Montelcino line is a knockout, and a great improvement over last year’s oxidized mess. For 2008, Banfi has produced a well-balanced mini-masterpiece, with a nose of black pepper and dried cherries, and a body of fresh cherries and raspberries, light tar notes, and a sultry vanilla-inflected finish. It all comes together in glorious fashion, incredibly drinkable with food and on its own — 100% Sangiovese at its best.

A / $55 / castellobanfi.com

Review: 2011 Palmeri Syrah and “Dark and Brooding” Wines

palmeri 93x300 Review: 2011 Palmeri Syrah and Dark and Brooding WinesPalmeri is a small producer in Northern California producing wines from both Sonoma and Napa county. We sampled two of the company’s recent releases.

2011 Palmeri Syrah Alexander Valley Van Ness Vineyard High-Elevation – Made from grapes grown at 1000 feet-plus. It’s an intense wine, the nose thick with anise, leather, and tobacco leaf, the body loaded with dense blackcurrant fruit, dark chocolate, olives, and a finish of Cocoa Pebbles topped with raspberry jam. Initially tight, it opens up over time to reveal some much-needed softness in the middle, though it remains quite daunting on the whole, at least for now. Let this one mellow for a few years. B / $43

2011 Palmeri “Dark and Brooding” Red Wine Sonoma County (pictured) – A mystery blend, but I’d guess it’s heavy on Zinfandel, Petite Sirah, and Cabernet if I had to. “Dark and Brooding” is a bit of a misnomer, as this wine is more like jammy and intense, thick with hefty blackcurrants, tobacco smoke, raisins, and menthol. Initially a bit off-putting, this wine slowly grows on you, but I wouldn’t dare approach it without a substantial meal to back it up. B / $NA

palmeriwines.com

Review: NV La Marca Prosecco

La Marca Prosecco 750ml 88x300 Review: NV La Marca ProseccoA standby of big box stores and mega liquor retailers, La Marca is unmistakable with its Tiffany-blue label and its frequently sub-$10 price tag. Fresh nose, with a touch of green bean edge. The body is toasty and a bit bready, backed with apple cinnamon character and a touch of grapefruit. It’s nothing special, but it’s an easy enough wine to sip on.

B+ / $12 / lamarcaprosecco.com

Review: Sandeman 2011 Vintage Port and 40 Year Old Tawny Port

Sandeman 40YO Tawny 211x300 Review: Sandeman 2011 Vintage Port and 40 Year Old Tawny PortWe’ve covered the Port-makers at Sandeman fairly regularly through the years. Today we get the honor to look at two of its most treasured bottlings: the latest vintage port release (2011), and the 40 year old tawny expression. Thoughts follow.

2011 Sandeman Vintage Port – Classic currant and some coffee notes on the nose. The body is fresh and less brooding than many of its contemporaries, with ripe blackberry and currant notes that lead to a tight finish. I’d give this at least a decade to mature and mellow before sampling again. Rating today: B / $75

Sandeman Tawny Port 40 Years Old – Tea brown in color. Surprisingly familiar, it drinks like a younger tawny, with steady notes of cola, raisins, black tea, and that familiar “old wine” character. Finishes with raspberry notes on the back of the palate. Lots of depth here. Try it with a rich dessert. 20% abv. B+ / $110

sandeman.eu

Review: 2011 Chateau Montelena Chardonnay Napa Valley

chateau montelena chardonnay 196x300 Review: 2011 Chateau Montelena Chardonnay Napa ValleyIt’s a crisp and bright Chardonnay from Montelena for this year’s release. The nose hints at both fruit and minerals, but not much oak, a hallmark for the Napa version of this varietal. Both melon and tropical notes are present, atop a core that offers peaches and lemon notes. Lots going on, but all kept in near-perfect balance. It’s probably tough to ask anyone to pay 50 bucks for Chardonnay at retail (think $100 on a wine list!), but if you’re going to do it, do it with this bottling.

A / $50 / montelena.com

Review: 2012 Clean Slate Riesling Mosel

Clean Slate Riesling Image 60x300 Review: 2012 Clean Slate Riesling MoselSomewhat sweeter than most dry Rieslings, but still crisp and clean, offering ample citrus, tropical notes, honey, and a finish of lightly roasted nuts. With a little more acidity you’d think you were drinking an Australian Sauvignon Blanc. Fresh and lively, this one’s an easy summer sipper (sorry, January!) but also works well with spicy food and lighter fare. Great price for an “uberfresh” wine.

B+ / $10 / cleanslatewine.com

Tasting Red Sancerre Wines: La Croix du Roy and Jerome Gueneau

La Croix Du Roy Sancerre Tasting Red Sancerre Wines: La Croix du Roy and Jerome GueneauSancerre is a lovely wine made in the Loire Valley, a crisp white made primarily from Sauvignon Blanc… except when it’s not. They also make red wine in Sancerre, from Pinot Noir grapes, in total comprising about 20% of the region’s production.

Red Sancerre, or “Sancerre Rouge,” is virtually unheard-of in the U.S. due to being overshadowed by the big boys in Burgundy. Though it’s stylistically quite a bit different, Sancerre’s Pinots still hang onto some of that sense of terroir, with occasionally bright fruit showing through.

We tried two currently available bottlings to see what the fuss (or lack of it) was all about. Thoughts follow.

2008 La Croix du Roy Sancerre Rouge – Light color, a somewhat dainty-looking wine. Somewhat herbacious, slight mushroomy nose. The body, though, offers bright, tart cherry and raspberry character, punctuated with notes of tea and licorice root. The finish is quite acidic, washing away some of the big fruit notes. B / $30

2010 Jerome Gueneau Le Clos Chartier Sancerre Rouge – Less well-crafted than the La Croix du Roy, this Sancerre features more pruny, raisin-driven notes, with intense herbal qualities. The wine opens up after a while to reveal more sultry, berry-driven fruit, but the initial texture is thin and the finish somewhat saccharine. B- / $20

Review: 2011 Ventisquero “Grey” Carmenere

ventisquero grey carmenere 102x300 Review: 2011 Ventisquero Grey CarmenereTying a Chilean Carmenere into the 50 Shades of Grey phenomenon is a bit of a stretch, but damn the torpedoes, we’re charging ahead anyway. Grey is a newish label from mega-producer Ventisquero, with a number of varietals under its belt. One of the latest is this Maipo Valley-originated Carmenere — Chile’s unofficial official grape — a 100% varietal bottling.

The nose offers earth and some raisin notes, with deep currant underpinnings. The body offers more of the same, with some tart apple character, and ample raspberry character. Opens up over time, with the initially heavy earth tones fading a bit, revealing a more cohesive, balanced whole.

B+ / $24 / ventisquero.com

Review: Spicy Vines Spiced Wine

spiced wine 99x300 Review: Spicy Vines Spiced WineWhether you call it mulled wine or gluhwein or glogg, spiced wine is a holiday tradition. Spicy Vines wants to bottle the experience — sort of — and bring it to you in a familiar package, without having to resort to kitchen alchemy.

Spiced Wine, by California-based Spicy Vines, starts with nonvintage, non-specified grape wine and adds traditional flavorings to the mix. Spicy Vines doesn’t specify what’s in here, but I doubt they would be surprising. The nose offers cinnamon and almonds, the body cloves, orange peel, and vanilla. The base wine is harmless and unremarkable, but it’s arguably better than the plonk most home glogg-brewers use as the base for their own mulled wine creations. The overall impact, at just 13.2% alcohol, isn’t as throat-burning as many mulled wine recipes. It’s got just enough Christmasy flair to add interest, but it’s ultimately innocuous enough for even those who are normally put off by mulled wine to enjoy. Those looking for a deeply “spicy” experience — as the bottle’s huge label seems to promise — may be a bit disappointed.

Spiced Wine can be served at room temperature or heated. If you warm it up, do so carefully and only a few seconds in the microwave at a time. This is a beverage that is best just slightly warmed. Too hot and it starts to get a little acrid.

B / $23 / spicyvines.com

Review: 2010 Donelan Syrah Knights Valley Obsidian Vineyard

donelan obsidian 95x300 Review: 2010 Donelan Syrah Knights Valley Obsidian VineyardAnother classically structured California Syrah from Donelan, this Knights Valley offering a thickly smoky, mushroomy, and pine forest-focused nose — with undergrowth terroir reminiscent of old Burgundy. On the palate, the wine offers more of this savoriness, bringing grilled meats and wet forest floor to the forefront. What’s lacking here is much fruit — just hints of blackcurrants and blackberries that are quickly overpowered by those tougher, more burly elements.

B / $90 / donelanwines.com

Review: 2012 Assembly Old Vine Zinfandel Lodi

assembly zin bottle shot high res 200x300 Review: 2012 Assembly Old Vine Zinfandel LodiAssembly makes a handful of wine in the Lodi AVA of Northern California. Here’s a quick look at the company’s latest zinfandel release.

This is a tough wine, with a tobacco nose and echoes of beef jerky. The body is dense and chewy, with blackberries at the core alongside menthol, leather, and hickory smoke notes — decent fruit, but a bit muddied with distractions. The finish remains surprisingly tannic, somewhat walled off, and a little difficult to approach.

C+ / $17 / assemblywineco.com

Review: Wolfgang Puck Wines, 2013 Releases

Wolfgang Puck Cabernet Bottleshot 116x300 Review: Wolfgang Puck Wines, 2013 ReleasesCelebrity chefs are plowing their way into the wine world (makes sense), and Wolfgang Puck is the latest with his own house wine that you can serve at your house. Made by DFV Wines (better known as Delicato), the two Puck wines we tried are easygoing and pleasant, but far from challenging or complex. Thoughts follow.

2010 Wolfgang Puck Red Blend Master Lot Reserve California – A bright and fresh red, thick with strawberry and raspberry, but with sweetness kept in check. The nose offers hints of tobacco smoke and leather, but the body pushes the fruit through to the finish. It’s a nice combination, but a simple one. B+ / $10

2011 Wolfgang Puck Cabernet Sauvignon Master Lot Reserve California – Dense with plum and currant, the fruit is countered by just a touch of earthiness, and some chocolate character. Pleasant, but again, simple as can be. B / $12

wolfgangpuck.com

Review: Wines of Mossback, 2013 Releases

Mossback2012ChardHiRes 93x300 Review: Wines of Mossback, 2013 ReleasesThe latest label from the Crew Wine Company, Mossback arrives with four California-focused varietals and price points around the $20 range. We tried two bottlings. Thoughts follow.

2012 Mossback Chardonnay Russian River Valley – Muted nose, some melon, some lemon oil notes, and a little buttery wood to smooth it all out. On the body, the buttery notes dominate, but they aren’t overly aggressive. In time, a mellow apple and lemon character slowly rises to the surface. Not overwhelmingly “Chard-like” nor ambitious in its fruit level, but a solid, food-friendly experience. B+ / $18

2010 Mossback Cabernet Sauvignon Chalk Hill – Simple yet pretty Cabernet, with a lightly herbal nose that’s backed by a body with a bit more vegetation on it. The fruit is more black currant than blackberry, with a finish that hints at cedar and rosemary. As with the Chardonnay, it’s a solid choice with a meal. B+ / $25

crewwines.com

Tasting the Wines of Hardy’s Australia, 2013 Releases

Nottage Hill Pinot Noir Non Vintage 82x300 Tasting the Wines of Hardys Australia, 2013 ReleasesAustralia’s Hardy’s may be a big producer that competes with the “critter wines” of the world, but considering its wines are this affordable, it keeps quality surprisingly high. Here’s a look at five recently released Hardy’s vintages — bottled under both the William Hardy and Nottage Hill label. Thoughts follow.

2011 William Hardy Chardonnay South Australia – On the nose it’s simplistic, with a rather rough, wood-driven nose and some alcoholic vapor character. The body offers some very sweet honey notes, with apricots, lemon-lime, and some mango character on the finish. As it aerates, the sweetness — which is initially almost sickly — mellows out, taking any wood character with it. What’s left is a basic, quite tropical Chardonnay that wears its fruit on its sleeve. B / $20

2011 William Hardy Shiraz South Australia – Surprisingly drinkable, this fresh and fruity wine keeps the sugar dialed back enough to make for an easily sippable potion either solo or at mealtime. The nose is lightly brooding and a touchy meaty, while the body is pure strawberry and raspberry. An approachable midweek sipper. B+ / $15

2012 Hardy’s Nottage Hill Chardonnay South Eastern Australia - Again, alcoholic vapors up front, with a buttery character that veers on movie theater popcorn, but the body offers fresh peaches and pineapple. Quite sweet, it’s got a creamy character to it that complements the tropical notes, almost like a sherbet. This becomes a bit much over time, making this fine for a glass, but somewhat overwhelming for a refill. B / $8

2012 Hardy’s Nottage Hill Pinot Noir South Eastern Australia - A harmless red, somewhat sweet and not immediately characteristic of the grape. Tart raspberries up front, with a kind of coffee and cocoa bean character underneath. Easy, silky finish. B+ / $14

2012 Hardy’s Nottage Hill Shiraz South Eastern Australia - A slight pepper character on the nose is the only thing that tips you off that this is Shiraz, but the overall craftsmanship of this wine shows off a modestly structured wine, ripe with berry fruit and dense with sweetness. The finish brings along some cedar box character, a surprising touch in an otherwise straightforward bottling. B+ / $13

hardyswines.com