Review: Graham’s Tawny Port 10 Years Old (2016)

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Graham’s 10 year old tawny has been repackaged and relabeled in a squatter, fatter bottle since we last saw it in 2012, but little seems to have changed with this engaging, entry-level tawny. (Though prices are coming down a bit.) Prominent notes include the expected raisin notes, backed up by spicy gingerbread, cloves, and tea leaf notes. The finish is leathery and cherry-driven… all of which makes for a lot of consistency in this venerable brand, despite the altogether new look.

A- / $25 / grahams-port.com

Review: 2014 Cloudy Bay Pinot Noir Marlborough

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Cloudy Bay’s latest pinot noir is a simplistic affair, quite acidic up front but lacking much structure underneath. Instead of focusing on fresh fruit, the wine showcases dull notes of forest floor, indistinct vegetation, and just a small amount dried, almost Madeirized berries. The finish is surprisingly astringent but otherwise unremarkable. That said, the acidity helps it to work well enough as a mealtime companion, but on its own I feel like all I really experience are its faults.

B- / $35 / cloudybay.co.nz

Review: Gary Farrell 2014 Chardonnay and Pinot Noir Russian River Valley

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Iconic Russian River winery Gary Farrell is out with its 2014 vintage wines, a chardonnay and a pinot noir. These are both the entry-level bottlings; single vineyard options abound if you want to go upscale. Let’s taste!

2014 Gary Farrell Chardonnay Russian River Valley – A gorgeous chardonnay, rich and full of fruit, with just the right amount of wood exposure to give it depth and body. Fresh apple finds a nice counterpart in big lemon notes, which add acidity and intrigue. The finish is round and lasting and just a touch herbaceous, which gives the wine balance while elevating it above the usual fare. Really, really well done. A / $35

2014 Gary Farrell Pinot Noir Russian River Valley – Surprisingly thin for a Russian River pinot, but with time in glass its simple cherry (both fresh and dried) notes become more forceful, tart and moderately acidic. The finish isn’t particularly engaging but finds some interesting companions in light notes of dried herbs, some licorice, and a touch of cocoa nibs. B / $45

garyfarrellwinery.com

Review: Rioja Wines of Hacienda Lopez de Haro, 2016 Releases

 

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Bodega Classica Hacienda Lopez de Haro is a classic producer of traditional wines in Rioja, spanning a variety of wines representative of the region. Today we look at three Rioja reds, a 100% tempranillo, and an older Crianza and Reserva bottling, both blends. Let’s dig in.

2015 Hacienda Lopez de Haro Rioja Tempranillo – This is a young, fresh 100% tempranillo (a “cosecha” wine with 4 months in barrel), that is pedal-to-the-metal fruit from start to finish. Think strawberry jam, with a touch of cinnamon, yet still quite dry and balanced, with a surprisingly gentle finish. Definitely worth a look. B+ / $10

2013 Hacienda Lopez de Haro Rioja Crianza – This is a bold wine for a Rioja, forthright and powerful, loaded with fruit-forward character you’d expect from a California red. That said, the bold red berries, plus notes of licorice candy, cinnamon, and cloves all come together to make for a cohesive wine that finishes strong, and which works quite well with food. B+ / $12

2009 Hacienda Lopez de Haro Rioja Reserva – In the early stages of oxidation, this reserva is already austere and starting to decline from its peak. The nose of tobacco and baking spice is engaging, but the moderately astringent body keeps the spices in check. What emerges on the finish is more of a dried herbal character, with ample licorice and Madeira-like notes. B- / $13

bodegaclassica.com

Review: Zonin 1821 Prosecco “Dress Code Collection”

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Quick, what grape is Prosecco made from? If you said Glera, well, you know more than most drinkers — but it turns out Prosecco can be made from more than just this varietal. In fact, Italian law specifies that up to 15% of the juice in a bottle can come from a number of grape varietals, including Verdiso, Bianchetta Trevigiana, Perera, Glera Lunga, Chardonnay, Pinot Bianco, Pinot Grigio, and Pinot Noir.

How does the secondary grape impact the finished product? Zonin attempted to find out by bottling a trilogy of nonvintage Proseccos, each using a different secondary varietal. Bottled as the “Dress Code Collection,” each in a different-colored bottle, the trio showcase how much a tiny bit of something else can change the finished product. (Turns out, plenty!)

Zonin 1821 Prosecco White Edition – 91% Glera & 9% Pinot Bianco. Crisp and pretty, with bold apple notes. Fresh and fruit-forward, with a slight herbal edge on the finish. The closest wine in this group to “classic” Prosecco, it’s a lush wine tailor-made for celebrations. A-

Zonin 1821 Prosecco Grey Edition – 87% Glera & 13% Pinot Grigio. A bigger body here, with slight tropical overtones. The more aggressive body also offers a clearer display of yeastiness, and leads to a somewhat plainer finish. B+

Zonin 1821 Prosecco Black Edition – 90% Glera & 10% Pinot Noir. The dryest of the bunch, the fruit is quite restrained here, showing notes of pear, fresh herbs, and a touch of baking spice. Very clean and crisp, it finishes with aromatic notes and hints of perfume. Quite elegant. B+

each $16 / dressyourfeelings.zoninprosecco.com

Review: Barbed Wire 2014 Red Wine Blend and Cabernet Sauvignon

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Trinchero’s latest brand is Barbed Wire, a budget offering from California’s North Coast (a region that encompasses pretty much anywhere on the northern half of the state). Nonetheless, Barbed Wire is trying to push quality higher, despite the reasonable price tag. We tried two releases from the 2014 vintage.

2014 Barbed Wire Red Wine Blend North Coast – This is a blend of cabernet sauvignon from Alexander Valley and merlot from Napa Valley. A rather innocuous wine, this blend offers a dusty, fruit-restrained attack with notes that focus on leather, tar, and bushy brambles. The finish brings out some black and blue berries, but remains quite dry and short, fading away within seconds. B- / $11

2014 Barbed Wire Cabernet Sauvignon North Coast – This is a lackluster cabernet, flabby with an unctuous, mouth-coating character and dialed back when it comes to fruit. Over time some engaging blackberry notes come to the fore, plus a dusting of juicy currants, but it’s awfully late in the game, after a generalized, gooey sweetness and vague forest floor notes have already taken hold. C / $11

tfewines.com

Review: 2014 Apothic Inferno

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What hath Robert Mondavi wrought? Wines aged in whiskey barrels are following its lead and pouring out of the woodwork, the latest being this California blend, which is aged for 60 days in ex-whiskey barrels. The particulars of the whiskey are a mystery, as is the wine itself. Not that it really matters — no grape could withstand the assault of two months of heavily-charred ex-bourbon casks, though the zinfandelishness of this offering makes a strong case for that varietal.

Tasting notes are hardcore: Prune, dried red berries, wet leather, chewing tobacco, and pulverized dried figs. A big vanilla-heavy and maple syrup-infused sweetness hits hard on the lengthy and overpowering finish, reminding one of the whiskey casking the wine has undertaken. As for the 15.9% alcohol level, well, best not to think about that too much.

As trends go, this one has yet to make much of a positive impression.

C- / $12 / apothic.com

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