Review: Liberated 2015 Sauvignon Blanc and 2013 Cabernet Sauvignon

liberated

A pair of mid-2016 releases of Liberated are here, both North Coast bottlings but different as night and day. Thoughts follow.

2015 Liberated Sauvignon Blanc North Coast – A fresh and lightly tropical sauvignon blanc that nonetheless has enough acidity to keep things alive and vibrant. Pineapple finds a companion in light, white floral elements and a spritz of perfume on the back end. The clean finish has a gentle dollop of sweetness. B+ / $17

2013 Liberated Cabernet Sauvignon North Coast – This wine immediately comes across as very young and a bit brash, quite green up front without much structure. Instead, it’s all pushy and immature wine notes, simple berries, and a slug of vanilla on the back end. Rather plain. C+ / $17

liberatedwine.com

Tasting the Chenin Blanc Wines of South Africa, 2016 Releases

chenin blancs

South Africa is making a name for itself with chenin blanc — or at least it’s trying to, and recently a number of vintners from the region banded together to showcase how chenin blanc was evolving in the country. (More chenin blanc is planted here than in any other country in the world.)

During an online tasting event, six wines from the region, ranging from the 2013 to the 2015 vintage, were introduced and tasted. These wines exemplify a wide range of styles, but the “house style” for South African chenin blanc offers crisp minerality along with a big enough body to stand up to food. In the U.S. you can think of chenin as a bit of a middle ground between chardonnay and sauvignon blanc. Designed to be versatile, it has a lot in common with modern pinot grigio, though it is usually a bit less fruity.

So, is chenin blanc from “.za” worth a look? Thoughts follow on the full half dozen.

2013 Raats Old Vine Chenin Blanc – Fresh and crisp, with slate-heavy, stonelike aromatics. The fruit here is simple and restrained, showing light peach notes, with ample minerality on the finish. B+ / $20

2015 Bellingham The Old Orchards Chenin Blanc – Considerably racier, balancing heavily perfumed aromatics with a slightly meaty backbone. Far more tropical than the typical chenin blanc tasted today. B+ / $22

2015 Stellar Winery The River’s End Chenin Blanc – The balance feels off on this wine, veering into astringent notes. Things open up in time, but I never got past the almost mothball-like aromatics and the heavily meaty body. C+ / $15

2015 Terre Brûlée Le Blanc – An exotic tropical note takes hold right from the start, with heavy pineapple notes fading into notes of guava. Somewhat atypical for chenin — though the perfumy aromatics remind you of its provenance — with a lengthy, fruit-forward, and rather heavy level of acidity. A favorite. A / $15

2015 Solms-Delta Chenin Blanc – Classic chenin blanc on the nose, lightly perfumed and showing ample mineral character. Almost textbook from start to finish, the wine takes those classic rocky slate notes and layers on notes of peach and pineapple, leading to an impressively lengthy finish. A- / $15

2014 Beaumont Hope Marguerite Chenin Blanc – Take a little of all of the above and you’ve got Beaumont’s chenin blanc, which showcases floral perfume notes, fresh pineapple fruit, and a touch of beef jerky. Lovely balance on the whole. A- / $32

wosa.co.za

Review: Zinfandels of Edmeades, 2013 Vintage

 

EDMEADES

Edmeades is a Mendocino-based part of the Jackson Family Vineyards empire, with a heavy focus on zinfandel. (Nay, an almost exclusive focus on zinfandel.)

Today we look at three of Edmeades’ single-vineyard expressions of the grape, all from the 2013 vintage.

2013 Edmeades Zinfandel Mendocino Ridge Perli Vineyards – Heavily fruit forward, this is a traditional zin with all the trimmings. Raisiny fruit? Yes. Notes of chocolate? Yes. Somewhat flabby body with a lengthy finish that shows off some vegetal overtones? That too. Overtones of caramel and blackberries add a little to the experience, but not enough to elevate this out of the rank and file. B / $31

2013 Edmeades Zinfandel Mendocino County Shamrock Vineyard – The raw and jammy fruit notes find some balance in the form of slightly sour balsamic notes, which really kick up as the lengthy, slightly chalky finish emerges. Old World in structure, this wine still suffers from a somewhat flabby body, but it’s engaging and intriguing enough to merit some exploration. B- / $31

2013 Edmeades Zinfandel Mendocino County Gianoli Vineyard – Sizable chocolate notes, along with notes of licorice and cloves, given this zin some character, but it doesn’t always fit perfectly with the densely fruity core, which is lush with berries and plum jam. Again, a rather unctuous and flabby body makes this less refreshing than one might like, though its complexities are interesting enough to merit a glass or two. B+ / $35

edmeades.com

Review: 2015 VieVite Cotes de Provence Rose

vievite

Another Provence-sourced rose, in quite a distinctive bottle.

There’s not a lot to write home about with this bottling, which muddies its floral aromas with notes of canned vegetables and chlorine. The palate is thin, almost watery at times, offering very mild strawberry notes alongside some notes of perfumed orange blossoms. Again though, the finish is weak and short, though ultimately quite harmless.

Aka Vie Vite.

B- / $17 / vievite.com

Review: 2015 Hahn Pinot Gris Monterey County

Hahn-PG15-Bottle-Image

2015’s pinot gris from Hahn has arrived. It’s a fresh and lively but straightforward white, with notes of mango backed up by a core of apples and pears. A touch of sweet baking spice adds complexity but keeps things from falling into the overly sweet side of the fence — despite a few marshmallow notes on the finish.

B+ / $14 / hahnwines.com

Review: 2015 AIX Rose Saint Aix Coteaux d’Aix en Provence

AIX ROSE 2015 1,5L

AIX — aka Saint Aix — is a Provence rose, likely a busy blend of grapes (though no specific grape varietals are stated).

As you’d expect, the wine exudes light strawberry, with notes of peaches that fade quickly to a moderately acidic body and a fresh, breezy finish that evokes light floral notes alongside tropical elements. Exceptionally light on the tongue, it’s one of the most easygoing roses of the season.

B+ / $16 / aixrose.com

Review: Wines of Francis Ford Coppola, 2016 Releases

ffc directors cut

You will not stop Francis Ford Coppola from pumping out wines. The man directed The Godfather, for Pete’s sake. Four new wines — all from the 2014 vintage — are on tap for review in mid-2016. Let’s dig in..

2014 Francis Ford Coppola Director’s Chardonnay Sonoma County – Oak and butter, nothing surprising here, but some notes of green figs and banana give this otherwise straightforward bottling at least a little something to hang on to. The finish ends up a bit on the sweet side, however. B- / $15

2014 Francis Ford Coppola Director’s Cut Chardonnay Russian River Valley – A higher-end bottling and a much different wine than the above — quite dry and herbal, with notes of melon complementing a more gentle pear character on the palate. The lengthy finish offers up some of chardonnay’s characteristic buttery sweetness, but keeps things restrained and balanced. B+ / $20

2014 Francis Ford Coppola Director’s Pinot Noir Sonoma Coast – Surprisingly lovely, this coastal pinot offers both bright fruit and more sultry notes of licorice, wet earth, and mushroom to add complexity and balance. The finish remains heavily acidic, with tart cherry notes pushing through everything. A great value bottling. A- / $20

2014 Francis Ford Coppola Director’s Cut Pinot Noir Russian River Valley – A very gentle pinot, uncharacteristic of the Russian River, with notes of restrained cherry, licorice, and root beer. The very light body supports these notes, layering in some strawberry character, leading it to a quiet and uncomplicated finish. An easy crowd-pleaser with just enough complexity to make it worth talking about. A- / $24

francisfordcoppolawinery.com