Category Archives: Wine

Tasting the Wines of Marchesi de’Frescobaldi

We previously reviewed  two wines (including the first two wines discussed below) in our coverage of Tuscany-based Frescobaldi, one of the royal families of Italian winemaking. In a recent online tasting with the family, we were led through a guided look at four of their current releases. All four are 90% to 100% sangiovese-based wines, but each comes with a much different terroir, aging regimen, and end result. Some thoughts on the four wines tasted follow.

2010 Marchesi de’Frescobaldi Chianti Rufina DOCG Riserva Nipozzano – Solid cherry with some bright acid, with notes of dark chocolate and coffee bean. Very herbal on the finish, with notes of rosemary and thyme. Quite drying but a clean, pure expression of Chainti. A- / $20

2011 Marchesi de’Frescobaldi Chianti Rufina DOCG Riserva Nipozzano Vecchie Viti – Bolder, with more balsamic character up front, and a more brooding, pungency underneath. The finish remains tougher and denser than the standard bottling, but quite food friendly. B+ / $30

2011 Marchesi de’Frescobaldi Chianti Rufina DOCG Riserva Montesodi – An estate selection of the Frescobaldi sangiovese harvest. Really lovely on the nose, with notes of both fruit and perfumed florals. Bright and lush, the body folds together cherries and chocolate sauce into a balanced and complex whole, presenting notes of tea leaf, bay leaf, and mint leaf. Lots of leaves. A / $40

2008 Marchesi de’Frescobaldi Brunello di Montalcino DOCG Castelgiocondo – A gorgeous wine, with a nose of chocolate covered cherries and a body that approaches the density of Port. Big and chewy, with touches of dried figs and black tea. Waves of vanilla wash ashore on the finish. Quite a wine, but definitely worth reserving for a special, meat-heavy meal. A- / $75

frescobaldi.it

Review: Flora Springs 2013 Chardonnay and 2012 Cabernet Sauvignon

flora springs 2012_napa_valley_cabernet_sauvignon_bottleWe’ve covered Flora Springs on a number of occasions — this is our third roundup this year alone. Here’s some new releases to get the new year going for ya.

2013 Flora Springs Chardonnay Napa Valley – Very traditional — with heavy oak influence bringing tons of vanilla custard to the table — with just a touch of lemon peel coming forward on the front of the palate. The body is almost oily in texture, the finish loaded with sweetness that makes for an underwhelming experience either solo or with food. Overwhelmingly average in today’s wine world. C / $24

2012 Flora Springs Cabernet Sauvignon Napa Valley – Traditional and straightforward, with a big plum attack and a sweetish currant finish. Not much in the way of secondary notes, except a slug of vanilla on the back side. Fine, if unchallenging. B / $40

florasprings.com

Review: Pampelonne Sangria

pampellonePampelonne’s new sangria comes in a can instead of a bottle for a reason. This new brand, made with French wines as a base, is lightly sparkling, which gives sangria a neat, new dimension. Available in 250ml mini-cans, these two varieties — one red, one (very pale) rose — are bottled at an easy-to-guzzle 6% abv. Thoughts follow.

Pampelonne Red Sangria – Made with grenache, syrah, and merlot. Pleasant, clearly made with a light-bodied wine. Notes of lemon peel and orange rind are present but not overdone. The fruit in the wine balances well with the added fruit, giving it a fresh but simple composition that seems tailor-made for summertime. B

Pampelonne Rose Lime – 100% Loire muscadet. A pretty pink color… but the nose says something else. Woody and a little funky, there’s a pungency here that just doesn’t seem right. The body offers a muted, artificial-tasting lime note, with a kind of woody element to the back end. While the Sangria is fresh and breezy, the Rose Lime isn’t nearly as fun. C

each $5 (250ml) / enjoypampelonne.com

Review: 2012 Juxtapoz Red Wine Blend North Coast

Juxtapoz bottle 005This new blend comes from the Delicato family, and it’s a bit of a mutt of a wine: Five grape varieties (not sure which) from all over northern California go into an inky, deep purple, super-fruity concoction. Initially overpowering, it does open up to reveal more charming layers underneath its up-front punch — muddled blackberry, dark chocolate chunks, some walnut meat, beef jerky, and ample notes of wood. The big body and almost pungent finish doesn’t turn the wine into a sugar bomb (thankfully), but it does try to push this wine into competition with more austere bottlings. I’m not sure it gets there, but it’s a nice effort.

B- / $25 / delicato.com

Review: NV Graham’s Six Grapes Porto Special Old Vines Edition

Grahams Six Grapes Old Vine (high res)If you’ve ever had a glass of Port, you’ve probably had Graham’s Six Grapes, an ubiquitous Ruby Port that is lush, easy-drinking, and cheap — making it a nice choice for everyday after-dinner sipping.

Now Graham’s is giving Six Grapes an upgrade with a new special edition bottling, Special Old Vines Edition. Graham’s explains:

It has been over a hundred years since the famous Six Grapes motif was first used on a bottle of fine Port, our winemakers at W & J Graham, Charles Symington and Henry Shotton, have decided to bottle a small quantity of a special wine made exclusively from the oldest vines on Graham’s five Quintas. The presentation of this special edition Six Grapes Old Vines Port pays homage to the original Six Grapes label that helped make the wine famous so many years ago. This wine will only be available in very limited quantities.

The wine is a winner. The intense raisin and prune notes of standard edition Six Grapes are pushed aside here to make room for more of a chocolate character. It still features classic raisiny Port notes, but in the Special Edition these take on a more gentle, less sour quality. The nose features touches of dried savory herbs, the body is laced with notes of gingerbread and cinnamon. Amazing in its depth, the wine is both fun to really dig into and explore but also incredibly easy to drink.

Only 500 cases have been made, so if this is up your alley, snap Graham’s Six Grapes Special Edition up!

A / $42 / grahams-port.com

Review: Wines of Sojourn, 2012 Vintage

Sojourner_PN_2011These three new releases hail from Santa Rosa-based Sojourn. The wines themselves are made from grapes sourced all the Northern California wine country. Thoughts follow.

2012 Sojourn Chardonnay Durell Vineyard Sonoma Coast – Big and buttery on the nose, and the body largely follows suit. Subtle notes of melon, tropical fruits, and tart gooseberry percolate on the tongue — but it’s that almost overbearing wood-and-vanilla character that sticks with you on the finish, and for a long while after. B / $48

2012 Sojourn Pinot Noir Wohler Vineyard Russian River Valley – A lush, rounded Pinot, typical of what you see from the Russian River. Lush cherry and raspberry get a lick of black pepper, some fruit-infused tea, and hints of lychee on the back end. Dangerously drinkable. A- / $48

2012 Sojourn Pinot Noir Ridgetop Vineyard Sonoma Coast – Quite a strange expression of Pinot, dense to the point of being almost raisiny on the nose, with some overtones of lavender and wet earth. The body is equally punchy, taking an almost Port-like body and lacing it with vegetal character and more of that wet earth. Needs more acidity — or perhaps just some more bottle time — to bring out the fruit in the grapes. B+ / $59

2012 Sojourn Pinot Noir Sangiacamo Vineyard Sonoma Coast – A fresh, classic Pinot, this one’s firing almost perfectly. Fresh cherry mingles with touches of black pepper, while the finish sweetens things up a tad with notes of strawberry. Perfect balance with just the right mix of acidity and oomph. Hard to put down. A / $54

sojourncellars.com

Review: NV Berlucchi ’61 Franciacorta Brut DOCG

brut_FC61It’s Italian sparkling wine, but it’s not Prosecco. Franciacorta is a DOCG area in the north of Italy, to the west of the Veneto, where most Prosecco is produced. While Prosecco is made from the Glera grape, Franciacorta is largely Chardonnay-based, with some Pinot Nero and Pinot Bianco, depending on the producer.

Berlucchi ’61, despite the name, is a nonvintage sparkler made from 90% Chardonnay and 10% Pinot Noir. The nose offers apple fruit, with touches of bread and yeast. The body starts off extremely — almost oppressively — so dry, it comes off as almost bitter. The wine opens up with time to reveal lots more fruit, a slightly buttery body, and notes of nutmeg and some citrus peel. Things still end up dry, but with more balance than its attack would indicate.

B+ / $30 / terlatowines.com

Review: 2011 Sanford Pinot Noir Sta. Rita Hills

Sanford Pinot Noir

The nose of this Santa Rita-originated Pinot Noir offers tantalizing black cherry and raspberry notes, plus hints of black pepper, but the body is heavily extracted to the point where it starts to get a bit pruny. Notes of green olive, currant jelly, and brewed tea. Fun at the start, it ultimately takes things too far out of bounds.

B / $44 / sanfordwinery.com

Tasting Report: 6 Spanish Garnacha Wines

Some say Garnacha, the Spanish inflection of Grenache, is the next “It Wine.” (It doesn’t hurt that most Garnachas are extremely inexpensive.) Is it so? We tasted six Garnachas (one of which is a Garnacha/Syrah blend), from 2009, 2012, and 2013 vintages, to see where this varietal is headed.

2009 Bodegas y Vinedos del Jalon Alto Las Pizarras Garnacha Vinas Viejas – Engaging, exotic, almost perfumed on the nose. Notes of violets and raspberry mingle with hints of black tea and coffee to create a surprisingly rousing and rounded whole. The finish heads toward more of a candied violet character, but there’s plenty of tannin here to keep things out of jam territory. A / $9

2009 Castillo de Maluenda Punto y Seguido Garnacha Vinas Viejas – The embarrassingly simple label wouldn’t cue you in to how impressive the wine in this bottle is, a showy, fruit-forward wine that simultaneously offers depth and balance. Notes of tea leaf, cola, and leather are layered atop blackberry and cherry forming a core that drinks with lushness but which features muted, well-smothered tannins. The finish is complex, echoing everything that’s come before with a fresh denouement. A / $15

2009 Vinas del Vero Secastilla Somontano - A little pruny and overcooked, almost stewed. Very dense fruit competes with balsamic notes and runs up against a finish that offers coffee bean and dense, oily leather notes. C- / $25

2012 Castillo de Monseran Carinena Garnacha – Very fruity, almost like a Gamay-based wine. Thick strawberry jam leads to a finish that’s almost sickly sweet and unbalanced. C- / $8

2012 Pagos del Moncayo Garnacha – A very easy-drinking garnacha, offering a refreshing mix of strawberry and currant notes, backed with light chocolate, some tea leaf, and gentle tannins. Though not entirely complex, it’s lovely from start to finish, and ready to go immediately. A- / $12

2013 Bodegas Paniza Agoston Garnacha & Syrah – A blend, as the name suggests, with a surprising amount of fruit from the start — it almost comes across as candied berries with a dusting of chocolate sprinkles. More herbal notes take hold as the wine develops on the palate — think thyme and rosemary on a Sunday roast — but that youthful spirit and dense fruit maintains the focus through to the finish. B+ / $8

When J. Lohr Chardonnay Met Lindt Chocolates

J. Lohr Estates Riverstone ChardonnayChocolate and wine are a classic match — but which chocolate, and which wine? Chocolatier Lindt and California winemaker J. Lohr have been working on figuring that out, and they think they have it down, now.

Among the half-dozen pairings they have devised, the duo sent this one for me to try out for myself: 2013 J. Lohr Chardonnay Riverstone Arroyo Seco Monterey paired with Lindt Excellence Dark Chocolate with Pineapple.

At first I didn’t think these two were going to pair well together. Chardonnay is not a natural companion with chocolate, but many white wines do feature tropical notes that might pair well with pineapple. The J. Lohr, however is a more traditional California style Chardonnay, with notes focused on vanilla, wood, and fresh apples, with very little tropical character to it at all. But surprisingly the wine does do an admirable job of really enhancing the pineapple in the chocolate. I am not sure if it’s the acid and fruit in the wine, or merely the presence of a liquid to help separate the chocolate from the fruit embedded in it, but I did find the pineapple and other citrus notes were much more powerful — and longer-lasting on the finish — when taken together with the Chardonnay. Neat trick. Give it a whirl.