Review: 2013 Rotari Brut and Rose


The Trento DOC is part of Italy’s Alto Adige, and it is home to Rotari, a well-distributed sparkling wine made using traditional methods. Generally gentle in style, these are wines that drink well on their own, with food, or in cocktails like Mimosas. As for these specific bottlings, here’s a look at two new, vintage-dated releases from Rotari. (Rotari also makes a lower-end nonvintage wine, so be sure you’re looking at the right bottling.)

2013 Rotari Brut Trento DOC – 100% chardonnay. Surprisingly light on its feet, this drinks like Prosecco crossed with Cava. Fresh and fruity with an apple-heavy core, the dry wine also offers notes of almond, lemon, and a bit of coconut. Gently fizzy with fine bubbles, it’s refreshing and cleansing on the lightly bubbly finish. The bottle may not look like much, but this is an easy go-to sparkler that won’t break the bank. A- / $20

2013 Rotari Rose Trento DOC – Made from pinot noir and chardonnay. Not nearly as much fun as the Brut, the rose has an overly creamy character that makes it a bit muddy at times, and which dulls the fruit profile. Notes of red berries and flowers on the nose give way to an odder body, which offers notes of peaches, bananas, and whipped cream. The finish is short, though harmless. B / $20

Tasting Riesling Two Ways: 2014 Blue Fish vs. 2015 Relax


Riesling gets a bad rap, because many drinkers associate it only with sticky-sweet wines that are suitable only for the dessert course or the cheese plate. Remember: Riesling comes in all shapes and sizes, from tooth-strippingly sweet to nearly bone dry. The two German rieslings we review below are both closer to the center of the spectrum, but both do a good job of showcasing the two faces of riesling that you’re likely to encounter today.

2014 Blue Fish Riesling Pfalz – This is on the border between dry and medium dry, a crisp and refreshing riesling that offers just the lightest hint of tropical fruit, plus a touch of lemon curd, particularly evident on the rather acidic finish. Aside from some light touches of herbs and a squeeze of tangerine, it’s a straightforward but wholly approachable wine. B+ / $10

2015 Relax Riesling Mosel – Semi-sweet, but not unpalatably so, with notes of lemon, pineapple, and fresh honey syrup. The sweetness builds on the finish, but a modest acidity helps to temper the finale, at least to a degree. Overall, it manages to be quite fresh, though squarely focused on the sweet experience. B- / $10

Review: 2014 Owsley Single Block Pinot Noir


Sonoma-Cutrer has been quietly producing a “grand cru” inspired pinot noir from its own prized Owsley Vineyard for four years, bottling it of course under the name of Owsley. This isn’t a second label — it’s kind of a zeroth label, a step up from garden-variety S-C, made with a single block of grapes and with decidedly unique winemaking practices. For example, for this 2014 release, “fermentation involved a unique combination of three different methods: oak tank, stainless steel tank and new French oak barrels with the heads removed. Each was allowed to ferment separately for several weeks before being ‘mingled’ together and aging for 16 months in the French barrels.”

The wine presents itself with loads of old world character, kicking off with a meaty, lightly smoky nose, and laying in balsamic notes. On the palate, the wine exudes austerity, offering notes of dark cherry fruit, more balsamic, some dusky spices, and a bit of black pepper. On the finish there are notes of tea leaf and tobacco. All told it’s a well-rounded wine that does indeed echoes great Burgundy, but with a unique, Sonoma spin.

A- / $50 /

Review: 2013 Avignonesi Vino Nobile di Montepulciano DOCG


Avignonesi’s latest 100% Sangiovese wine from the Montepulciano is very dry, almost dusty at times, with more balsamic on the body than I’d expect for a wine of this age. Pleasant enough with food but somewhat thin on its own, the core of dark cherries and blackberries is powerful enough at the start, but eventually it gives way to tobacco, coal dust, and some heavier, green notes.

B / $29 /

Review: 2011 Marina Cvetic Montepulciano d’Abruzzo DOC


A companion red to Cvetic’s Abruzzo-based white, this is a 100% Montepulciano d’Abruzzo from the same region. It’s a big, burly wine with powerful balsamic notes up front, leading quickly to an astringent, almost sour finish. Notes of sour cherry, strong tea, licorice, and bitters give the wine some depth, and some soul, but on the whole this wine is already fading and showcases a serious need to be paired with an appropriate type of food to find some level of balance. Tasted twice; first bottle was corked.

B- / $19 /

Review: Broadside 2014 Chardonnay and Cabernet Sauvignon


Here’s a pair of new releases from Broadside, based in Paso Robles.

2014 Broadside Chardonnay Central Coast Wild Ferment – This classic California chardonnay has heavy notes of brown butter, but dials back the overbearing wood character. Some mild notes of figs and pears take up the slack with a dash of vanilla extract on the back end. It’s a little flabby and gummy around the edges, but it’s good enough as an aperitif. B / $18

2014 Broadside Cabernet Sauvignon Paso Robles – With a nose that offers notes of bramble and tar, you might expect Broadside’s cab to knock you out with tannin on the palate. Not so. The wine is a surprisingly soft expression of cabernet, offering notes of gentle red fruit, baking spice, slate, and touches of vanilla. The finish is a bit herbal, but quite nicely balanced. A- / $18

Review: Wines of Francis Ford Coppola, Late 2016 Releases


A septet of new releases from our friends at FFC. Quality on this round is literally all over the place…

2014 Francis Ford Coppola Sofia Blanc de Blancs Monterey County – The cellophane wrapper should connote luxury, but to me it always comes across as scary. This wine — vintage blanc de blancs! — smells like fizzy chardonnay, which is basically what it really is. Notes of bubble gum and vanilla candy aren’t wildly inappropriate against the backdrop of a gummy, foamy body, but it hardly makes for a nuanced drinking experience. C+ / $15

2015 Francis Ford Coppola Rosso & Bianco Pinot Grigio – A simple pinot grigio on the whole, though notes of marzipan and parmesan cheese take things in an unexpected, somewhat rustic direction. Gentle with citrus and apple fruit, lightly acidic, and mildly perfumed, it’s got a bit of everything, which is both good and bad, but which helps to acquit the wine appropriately for what’s intended to be an everyday table wine. B+ / $9

2015 Francis Ford Coppola Diamond Collection Pinot Grigio – A fruit-heavy style of pinot grigio, with notes of lychee, mango, and pistachio, with a finish that echoes notes of nougat. Quite sweet, but approachable. B / $12

2014 Francis Ford Coppola Votre Sante Chardonnay California – The label is perhaps meant to remind one of Burgundy, but the palate instead screams “Central Valley.” This is some questionable chardonnay, doctored up and over-oaked to within an inch of its life, offering a nose of sweet honey and a palate that pinballs between candy and canned vegetables. Throughout all of this: An overlay of liquid oak. Ugh. D / $10

2014 Francis Ford Coppola Diamond Collection Pavilion Chardonnay – The fine print on the back details that this is a Santa Lucia Highlands wine, and its elevated appellation (over the California-only appellation of the Votre Sante) shows bright apple fruit with light vanilla notes, brown butter, and fresh cream. There’s a lovely balance here that many of the wines in this roundup are lacking, and a freshness on the finish that is almost inspiring. A- / $20

2015 Francis Ford Coppola Sofia Rose Monterey County – This is the still rose from the Sofia sub-label, a strawberry-hued and -flavored oddity that won’t inspire or excite. Underneath those sweet berries there’s a somewhat muddy character, lingering on the finish side by side with some increasingly candy-like notes. C / $15

2013 Francis Ford Coppola Pitagora Red Wine Blend Sonoma County – The sole red wine in this collection, Pitagora is a blend of syrah, petit verdot, cabernet sauvignon, cabernet franc, and petite sirah, but it feels closest in tone to a rustic Italian wine, full of dried herbs, cherries, and olive notes. Very dry, with an undercurrent of balsamic. B / $26