Category Archives: Wine

Rueda Wines Reviewed: Shaya and Jose Pariente

Shaya Habis 376x1200 Rueda Wines Reviewed: Shaya and Jose ParienteFret not if you’re unfamiliar with Rueda. This region, directly to the west of Spain’s Ribera del Duero, is the home to a white wine that is beginning to find favor overseas. Long a favorite in its homeland, Rueda wines are made primarily from the verdejo grape (viura and sauvignon blanc are also grown here, as are some red wine grapes). Best of all, the wines are quite affordable and designed for everyday drinking (much like Ribera reds).

Think of verdejo as somewhere between sauvignon blanc and viognier. For a more detailed look at what this wine is like, we examined two recent vintages straight outta Rueda.

2010 Bodegas Shaya Habis Verdejo Old Vines Rueda – Somewhat buttery and nutty on the nose at first, the wine’s aromatics eventually take hold on the tongue, offering light perfume mingled with notes of apricot, lime zest, and a touch of tropical character. Hazelnuts make an appearance as the wine’s finish fades, bringing things full circle. A- / $25

2013 Jose Pariente Verdejo Rueda – A touch musty, this wine offers peaches and apricots on the nose. A touch of caramel and cotton candy get the palate started, and then more of a citrus and tropical character takes hold. Pleasant, simple, and fruit-forward. B+ / $10

Review: 2011 Matchbook Tempranillo Dunnigan Hills

matchbook tempranillo 83x300 Review: 2011 Matchbook Tempranillo Dunnigan HillsHere’s a surprisingly lovely little wine from JL Giguiere’s Matchbook brand, made from Tempranillo in Yolo County, grown in the Sierra Nevada foothills.

The restrained nose features notes of tanned leather, stonework, touches of smoke, and dried fruits. On the palate, things are more fruit-forward: dark cherries, plums, tobacco, and cranberry notes lead to a well-rounded, moderately big finish. This wine offers balance as well as lasting fruit notes that polish off a food-friendly, imminently drinkable wine that drinks like a considerably more expensive bottling.

A- / $15 / crewwines.com

Review: 2011 Avignonesi Vino Nobile di Montepulciano DOCG

avignonesi nobile2011 114x300 Review: 2011 Avignonesi Vino Nobile di Montepulciano DOCGThis 100% Sangiovese wine from the Montepulciano region is a beautiful introduction to both the grape and the region. Bright cherry notes mingle with a touch of raspberry, plus touches of vanilla, flinty stone, coffee bean, and some cinnamon on the finish. Over time, hints of chocolate emerge — give it some air. Lush without being overpowering, the wine is a perfect solo fireside companion but also works perfectly with food.

A- / $29 / avignonesi.it

Review: 2013 Complicated Pinot Noir Sonoma County

complicated pinot 96x300 Review: 2013 Complicated Pinot Noir Sonoma CountyA dustier expression of Pinot, this Sonoma County bottling offers notes of black cherry, orange peel, and currants, but is undercut by some rougher, lumberyard notes that leave a distinctly drying character on the palate. This is distinctly at odds with some of the sweeter elements in the wine — these become quite thick on the finish — which creates either a curious juxtaposition or a contradiction. You make the call.

B- / $20 / takenwine.com

Review: Jardesca Blanco California Aperitiva

jardesca 525x700 Review: Jardesca Blanco California Aperitiva

Drinkhacker pal Duggan McDonnell — of Encanto Pisco fame — is up to some new tricks. His latest project: Jardesca, a lightly fortified, aromatic wine. Esseentially part of the vermouth/Lillet category, Jardesca is a blend of sweet and dry wines plus a double-distilled eau de vie that is infused with 10 different botanicals. The big idea: Find a balance between the cloyingly sweet stuff and the grimace-inducing bitter apertifs.

Jardesca’s bittersweet character is at first surprising because it’s so different from other aperitif wines. A bit off-putting, I found myself struck first by notes of dill, eucalyptus, and dried apricot. That’s a weird combination of flavors, and it takes some processing — and some time exploring the product to really figure out what’s happening here. The wine develops in the glass and on the palate, offering rich honey notes, grapefruit, and a nose that’s increasingly heavy with floral aromatics — lavender and honeysuckle, plus rosemary notes.

Like I said, lots going on here, and sometimes it comes together beautifully, and sometimes it comes across as a bit much. Actually I found myself enjoying the more herbal components of Jardesca over its sweetness, which helps it to shine quite brightly in a vodka martini. It works well on its own, but I think its true destiny is a spot on progressive bar menus as a more intriguing vermouth.

18% abv.

A- / $29 / jardesca.com

Review: 2014 Georges Duboeuf Beaujolais Nouveau

2014 Georges Dubouef Beaujolais Nouveau Bottleshot 153x300 Review: 2014 Georges Duboeuf Beaujolais NouveauAnother year, another Bojo-Nouveau, the “first wine of the harvest,” as Georges Duboeuf’s less-garish-than-usual label reminds us.

This year’s Beaujolais Nouveau is the usual shade of grape juice-purple, with a jammy nose redolent of grape jelly, strawberry, some violet notes, and mud. The body runs through all of the above paces, introducing some shades of tea leaf, cocoa bean, and cranberry, before settling into a brambly, slightly dusty finish. The finish is less sweet than expected, but what fruit notes are there rapidly run from pulp to pits.

As always, this wine is perfectly palatable but for only one night, primarily as a celebratory novelty. Here’s to another harvest in the books!

B- / $12 / duboeuf.com

Review: Austerity 2013 Pinot Noir and Chardonnay

austerity wines 300x200 Review: Austerity 2013 Pinot Noir and ChardonnayTwo new bottlings from Austerity, a Monterey County-based operation. Thoughts follow.

2013 Austerity Pinot Noir Santa Lucia Highlands – Classic SoCal Point structure, rich with cherry jam and strawberry preserves. But the flabby body and overly sweetened finish mar an initially appealing character. Notes of tea leaf and coffee bean add a touch of mystery, at least. B / $17

2013 Austerity Chardonnay Arroyo Seco – An unfortunate misfire. The nose smells just fine, typical of California Chardonnay with buttery, woody, fruit. The body starts off with brisk apple and vanilla notes, but this quickly takes a turn into less delightful character, with notes of canned fruit, sugar syrup, and aluminum foil. Meh. C / $17

cecchettiwineco.com

Review: Bee d’Vine Honey Wine

BeeDvine Brut 750 HIGH 200x300 Review: Bee dVine Honey WineYou can make wine from just about anything, but honey wine has a long and rich history, dating back some 2000 years to Africa, where the honey seems to flow freely.

If you’ve ever had mead at a Renaissance festival (or your crazy uncle’s house), you basically know what you’re in for. Honey wine is essentially the same thing. Depending on who you ask, the addition of water to dilute the alcohol level is what separates mead from the lighter, gentler “honey wine.”

Bee d’Vine is a product made by The Honey Wine Company, based in San Francisco, California. The company’s fermented honey drink is blended in two varieties — a dry Brut and a sweeter Demi-Sec version. (Those terms are typically used with sparkling wines, but Dee d’Vine is still, not fizzy.) They were produced in 2013, but regulations prevent the inclusion of vintage dates on non-grape wines.

How you enjoy them will depend on your tolerance level for exotic oddities in your gullet. Thoughts follow.

Also of note: The company supports farming and environmental initiatives in California and in Ethiopia, the birthplace of honey wine.

(Updated 11/23 with factual corrections to The Honey Wine Co.’s location and its charitable initiatives.)

Bee d’Vine Brut Honey Wine – A dusty, earthy nose offers a dusting of familiar honey character but the overwhelming character is one of low-grade white wine, a muddy mix of old apples, earth, simple florals, and industrial elements. It’s pleasant enough at first — particularly when ice cold — but you have to be utterly nuts about honey to polish off a full glass once the more raw components take hold. D+ / $43

Bee d’Vine Demi-Sec Honey Wine – A semi-sweet expression of this wine, and probably more in keeping with what you’d be expecting of a product made out of honey. The nose is similar to the Brut — earthy and a bit musty, with honey overtones. The body blends its honey character with something akin to orangey Muscat wine, leading to a finish that is at first sweet but which quickly fades to an unwieldy combination of syrup and mud. C- / $43

beedvine.com

Review: XXIV Karat Grand Cuvee and Rose — Sparkling Wine with Gold Flake

karat bottles 525x679 Review: XXIV Karat Grand Cuvee and Rose    Sparkling Wine with Gold Flake

What, sipping Cristal ain’t baller enough for you? Kick back some XXIV Karat (that’s 24 Karat if you ain’t down with Roman numerals), a sparkling wine that is infused with “indugent 24-karat gold leaf.”

Yeah, Goldschlager wrote this playbook, and El Cartel Tequila tore it up. Gold flake in spirits is becoming common these days. Gold flake in wine is something I’ve yet to see before.

But here we are.

XXIV Karat takes Mendocino-sourced grapes (varietals are not disclosed) and adds real gold flake to the bottles. (For extra fun, the sample bottles we received actually light up thanks to a battery-powered bulb in the base.) The wines are also bottled without vintages, but let’s be frank: If you’re buying one of these, you’re getting it exclusively for the gold flake concept.

It seems almost silly to consider how such a novelty might taste, but we’re gonna do it anyway. Here goes.

XXIV Karat Grand Cuvee Sparkling Wine – Surprisingly pleasant at first, this wine starts off with apple notes but devolves into extreme sweetness in short order. What emerges is akin to a combination of applesauce and Splenda, with a palate-busting finish — but did we mention there’s gold in here? C- / $30

XXIV Karat Rose Sparkling Wine – Pink stuff! (And gold.) The gold leaf effect is not nearly as interesting in the pinkish slurry, but the wine is at least more palatable. Fresh strawberries mingle with plenty of vanilla-focused sweetness, but here that sugary rush is dialed back enough to let the fruit shine through, at least somewhat. B- / $30

xxivkarat.com

Rioja Review: 2008 Rioja Bordon and 1998 Vina Albina

Franco Espanolas Reserva Bordon 2008 160x300 Rioja Review: 2008 Rioja Bordon and 1998 Vina AlbinaWhen it comes to upscale wines, Rioja is a category that is often overlooked. But these Spanish wines, primarily Tempranillo with a smattering of other Spanish regional grapes, like Mazuelo and Graciano, thrown in, can often be aged for a decade or more, particularly at the Reserva level or higher.

Today we look at a 2008 Reserva and a 1998 Gran Reserva (the only major production difference is time spent in barrel and bottle before release). Both are now available on the market.

2008 Bodegas Franco Espanolas Rioja Bordon Rioja Reserva – There’s good age on this bottling of a classically-structured Rioja Reserva, offering a nose of dusky, dried fruits, charred wood, and roasted meat. The body is lightly balsamic with tart cherry character and more of those meaty/slightly smoky notes on the finish. A- / $15

1998 Bodegas Riojanas Vina Albina Rioja Gran Reserva – At 16 years old, this one’s starting to feel its age, with some oxidation starting to creep in on an austere and brambly experience. Notes of balsamic, dried figs, and cherry jam emerge, along with a heavily tannic, licorice-flecked finish. Still showing well, but it is beginning its downswing. B+ / $50

Review: NV Menage a Trois Prosecco

Menage a Trois Prosecco LO Res Bottle Shot 83x300 Review: NV Menage a Trois ProseccoOne is wise not to expect a whole lot from a $12 Prosecco, but this DOC-classified bottling is perfectly acceptable for a quick punch of sparkly stuff. The nose offers modest yeast and bready/toasty notes, with modest hints of apple beneath. The body is more pear-like, with notes of lemon jellybeans and just a hint of white floral character. Crisp, tart, and refreshing on the finish — what it lacks in complexity it makes up for in approachability and value.

B+ / $12 / menageatroiswines.com

Review: 2012 Frank Family Vineyards Pinot Noir Carneros

Frank Family Napa Valley Pinot Noir 131x300 Review: 2012 Frank Family Vineyards Pinot Noir CarnerosA lighthearted and light-bodied Pinot from Frank Family, this Carneros offering features plenty of jammy fruit — strawberry and cherry intermingled — along with notes of tea leaf, cinnamon, and vanilla candies. A bit flabby in the body, it’s a bit hamstrung by those jammy elements that unfortunately push it too far into fruit juice territory.

B- / $35 / frankfamilyvineyards.com

Review: 2012 Boneshaker Zinfandel Lodi

bon zin 12 bottle new 132x300 Review: 2012 Boneshaker Zinfandel LodiBig Zin fans rejoice: Boneshaker easily lives up to its name. This punchy, Lodi-grown Zinfandel (produced by Hahn Family Wines) is thorny with notes of dark chocolate, coffee beans, and a melange of stewed prunes and raisins. And that, basically, is it. With a lasting and rustic, slightly dirty finish, it’s a BBQ-friendly wine that sticks to the ribs. And, at 15% alcohol by volume, the wine’s tagline — “Feel it.” — is one to take to heart.

B /$20 / hahnfamilywines.com

Review: Frescobaldi 2010 Nipozzano and 2011 Nipozzano Vecchie Viti

NipozzanoVecchiViti2011 79x300 Review: Frescobaldi 2010 Nipozzano and 2011 Nipozzano Vecchie VitiTwo new releases from  Marchesi de’Frescobaldi, the royal family of Tuscany — the standard bottling of Nipozzano (named after the 1000-year-old family estate) and a new release of Vecchie Viti, a bottling rarely seen on U.S. shores. Thoughts follow.

2010 Frescobaldi Nipozzano Riserva Chianti Rufina – A textbook example of what Chianti should be, bright with that signature cherry of sangiovese, but complicated by notes of tea leaf, cocoa powder, and a mushroomy earthiness on the finish. The denouement is dour and brooding, not big and fruity — or highly acidic — like so much Chianti can be. A big winner at mealtime, less of a solo sipper. A- / $16

2011 Frescobaldi Nipozzano Riserva Vecchie Viti Chianti Rufina – This “old vines” release of Nipozzano is a more fruit-forward, slightly jammier expression of Chianti. Aged 24 months in barrel, it exhibits notes of fresh cherries, strawberry, and fresh mixed berry jelly. A bit on the sweet side for my tastes — compared to the more herbal, earthy notes I like to see in a Chianti, but still a fun wine that’s worth exploring. B+ / $30

frescobaldi.it

Review: 2012 Collazzi Liberta Toscana IGT

LIBERTA 2012 foto 77x300 Review: 2012 Collazzi Liberta Toscana IGTThis Tuscan mutt is 55% merlot, 30% syrah, and 15% sangiovese. It’s also awfully damn good for a sub-$20 wine. Earth hits the nose first, with notes of dried mint, violets, and cedar chest coming along in short order. On the palate, the merlot is right up front, offering those characteristic floral notes, slightly sweetened by the fruity, cherry character in the syrah and the sangiovese. The finish offers notes of chocolate, mint, amari, and a dusting of cloves. Any restaurant looking for an amazing wine-by-the-glass should add this to their list pronto.

A / $17 / collazzi.it

Review: 2013 Achaval Ferrer Malbec and Cabernet Sauvignon

achaval ferrer CMendoza 2013 88x300 Review: 2013 Achaval Ferrer Malbec and Cabernet Sauvignon2013 releases from Achaval Ferrer, based in Mendoza, are here. We tasted the Malbec and the Cab from this major Argentinian producer.

2013 Achaval Ferrer Malbec Mendoza – Overpowering, and not in a good way. Intense notes of menthol cigarette smoke, backed by a heavily balsamic vinegar character. Mouth-puckering with heavy acidity and a vegetal underpinning, this is not Malbec at its finest. D+ / $19

2013 Achaval Ferrer Cabernet Sauvignon Mendoza – Starts off dusty and tannic, but with time it opens up to reveal a surprisingly capable, if simple, expression of Cabernet. Light plum on the nose leads to a dense, leathery, raspberry/blackberry-driven body. Lightly vinegary on the finish, but this works well enough, particularly with food. (I even had a good experience with it alongside grilled salmon.) B / $20

achaval-ferrer.com

Tasting the Wines of Chateau du Moulin-a-Vent

An icon of the Beaujolais, Moulin-a-Vent’s estate began producing wines as early as the 1700s. Today the estate has 30 hectares of land under vine, separated into 91 different plots — many of which are used to make single-plot releases showcasing a specific terroir. Ownership changed with the 2009 vintage — and some of these wines are just now hitting the market.

Beaujolais is of course the home of Gamay (red wines) and Chardonnay (whites, which are comparatively rare). Moulin-a-Vent only grows Gamay. Its Pouilly-Fuisse is made with non-estate fruit.

We recently looked at eight different wines from this famed chateau, in three different categories:

First are the CMV wines, which feature a much different art deco-style label and are made from non-estate fruit.

CMV Couvent Des Thorins Brand 300x273 Tasting the Wines of Chateau du Moulin a Vent2012 CMV Moulin-a-Vent Pouilly-Fuisse Vielle Vignes - A rather vegetal white wine, it shows lemony notes at first before delving into a rather intense green vegetable note that builds on the finish. This eases up a bit with some warmth, but the slightly bitter character is sustained for quite awhile. B / $15

2012 CMV Moulin-a-Vent Couvent des Thorins – Classically Old World on the nose, with lots of vinegary acid, rhubarb, and licorice root notes. The body is equally heavy on the acid, brash and mouth-searing with its simplistic cherry-like construction and fiery finish. C- / $15

Up next, these are blends from all many of Chateau du Moulin-a-Vent’s plots. They comprise the most common expressions from the chateau. Here’s a look at a vertical of three recent vintages of the wine.

2011 Chateau du Moulin-a-Vent – Engaging nose, with gentle fruit, some smoke, some mint. The body is ripe without being overly fruity or lush, a gentler expression of gamay with a core of simple plums, touches of vanilla, and notes of pumpkin spice on the back end. Easy to enjoy. B+ / $20

2010 Chateau du Moulin-a-Vent – More earth here, particularly on the dusty, mushroomy nose. The body offers balance between the savory earth elements and fruit, presenting a significantly different profile than the fruitier 2011. Fans of bigger, more wintry, and more food-appropriate wines will probably prefer this style. B+ / $20

2009 Chateau du Moulin-a-Vent – Well past its prime. Again, showing lots of oxidation and acidity like the Thorins reviewed above, with a somewhat skunky, burnt nose and a body that attacks the tongue with vinegar notes. This was an exemplary vintage in Beaujolais, so it appears time has really had its way with this wine. C- / $20

Finally come the terroir-driven, plot-specific releases from Chateau du Moulin-a-Vent. Each is released with its specific plot noted on the label.

2009 Chateau du Moulin-a-Vent Clos de Londres - It fares better than the standard 2009 bottling above, but not by much. Again, it’s well past its prime, showing strong vinegar chateau du moulin a vent 11 Croix des Verillats Bottle 83x300 Tasting the Wines of Chateau du Moulin a Ventnotes, but offering pleasant enough cranberry, raspberry, and blackberry character after the intense acid starts to fade. C+ / $NA

2011 Chateau du Moulin-a-Vent Champ de Cour – Ample earth and licorice notes, backed by restrained, austere fruit — raspberries and blackberries. The finish features tobacco notes, blackberry jam, and a return to some of that woody, earthy funk. An interesting wine with shades of the 2010 standard bottling. B+ / $34

2011 Chateau du Moulin-a-Vent Croix des Verillats – Notes of ripe cheese on the nose start things off in a weird way, but the highly fruity, almost jelly-like body, pairs with it in an unexpected way. This is an austere wine that drinks like an older expression of Moulin-a-Vent, but offers a worthwhile complexity and depth to it. B+ / $32

chateaudumoulinavent.com

Review: 2012 Pinot Noirs from Domaine Carneros

DC LA TERRE PROMISE PN NV 96x300 Review: 2012 Pinot Noirs from Domaine CarnerosThree new Pinots from Domaine Carneros, all part of the 2012 vintage, including two single-clone varietals, a rare feat in the Pinotverse.

2012 Domaine Carneros Pinot Noir Clonal Series Swan – Each year Domaine Carneros spotlights one of the 12 different Pinot Noir clones grown here by bottling it separately. The 2012 vintage is the first year to feature the Swan clone. It’s textbook Pinot at first, but eventually reveals itself to be a bit on the sweet side, with notes that veer more toward chocolate sauce and raisin notes up front, with a tart, mouth-puckering finish that hints at tobacco leaf. As a big Pinot fan I could drink this any day, but the lushness of the body becomes a bit overwhelming by the end of the second glass. B+ / $55

2012 Domaine Carneros Pinot Noir Clonal Series Dijon 115 - Another wine from the Clonal Series, Dijon 115 is a better-known clone and it’s easy to see why it’s so popular, offering a dense cherry core that’s studded with notes of cola, tea leaf, and chocolate. The finish heads floral, recalling violets and a touch of spice. Pretty but also lush, this wine could easily be released as is, no blend required. A / $55

2012 Domaine Carneros Pinot Noir La Terre Promise – This is a single-vineyard estate wine from Domaine Carneros, created from a blend of Pinot clones. Here the whole is less than the sum of the parts. The wine is deep and rich, with chocolate notes, but it’s lacking the lively fruit that great Pinot has, replacing it with Port-like currant notes. There’s a touch of vegetal-driven bitterness here, too, particularly on the finish. My wife said she never would have guessed this was Pinot if she’d tasted it blind, and it’s easy to see why. The density and sweetness of the wine make it come across closer to a Zin-Cab hybrid, not the elegant type of wine I typically associate with Domaine Carneros. B+ / $55

domainecarneros.com

Review: 2013 Galerie Naissance and Equitem Sauvignon Blancs

galerie Naissance Equitem Beauty Shot 200x300 Review: 2013 Galerie Naissance and Equitem Sauvignon BlancsInspired by her upbringing in Spain (and particularly its cuisine), winemaker Laura Diaz Munoz brings the racy stylings of the Spanish table to the Northern California wine scene. Two new Sauvignon Blancs have just arrived from this Oakville-based operation. Thoughts follow.

2013 Galerie Naissance Sauvignon Blanc Napa Valley – No “re” in this “naissance,” I guess. What’s left is a a wine that’s somewhat chalky on the palate, with notes of green apple, honeysuckle, and sour lime zest. A crisp, summery wine, it’s got plenty of pucker with that telltale Sauvignon Blanc pepe du chat. B / $30

2013 Galerie Equitem Sauvignon Blanc Knights Valley – A sweeter expression of Sauvignon Blanc, with notes approaching figs, lemon-lime soda, and sweetened grapefruit. More body, with a chewier, more substantial palate. A- / $30

galeriewines.com

Review: 2013 Bodvar of Sweden No. 5 Rose Cotes de Provence

sweden wine 284x300 Review: 2013 Bodvar of Sweden No. 5 Rose Cotes de ProvenceRest easy: Sweden isn’t producing wine (or at least, it isn’t exporting any to our soils). This is a French Cotes de Provence created by a new, boutique wine company from our friends to the northeast: Bodvár of Sweden – House of Rosés.

The brainchild of Bodvar Hafström, the Bodvar brand includes sales of cigars, brandy, and now wine. No. 5 (no word on what happened to Nos. 1 through 4) is a rose of Grenache and Cinsault that hails from Saint-Tropez in the Provence region. Somewhat atypical of the typical wines from this region, it offers a nose ripe with mixed fruit, but it also has a sharpness to it, a strong tang — both touched with citrus juice and grated peel. The body is both lush with notes of peaches and apricots, with a dusting of dried herbs on the finish. This herbal quality grows as the wine develops and warms. I’m not entirely sure how I feel about it, as it robs some of the sweetness from an otherwise well-made wine, but at least it has me thinking.

B / $24 / bodvarofsweden.com