Category Archives: Flavored Whiskey

Review: Jack Daniel’s Tennessee Fire

Jack Daniels Tennessee Fire Bottle 408x1200 Review: Jack Daniels Tennessee Fire

JD jumped into the honey-flavored whiskey market and made massive waves. Why not try it again with cinnamon?

Tennessee Fire is a classic cinnamon-infused spirit, with a nose that’s immediately redolent of Red Hots, but not overpowering. The body is more quiet and candylike than, well, fiery. The palate starts off sweet, with vanilla caramel notes, essentially classic JD, with the attention of some apple cider character in the mid-palate. The cinnamon comes along later, well tempered with plenty of sugar to keep the cinnamon candy notes from searing the roof of your mouth. This is fine — no one is drinking these whiskeys because they enjoy pain — but Jack’s rendition ends up a little over-sweetened, the way too much Equal leaves a funky taste on your tongue.

The bottom line: JD may have mastered honey, and Tennessee Fire is mostly harmless, but I think other cinnamon whiskeys do this style better.

The test launch of “Jack Fire” (as you are invited to call it) begins in April in Oregon, Pennsylvania, and Tennessee.

70 proof.

B+ / $22 / jackdaniels.com

Review: Sinfire Cinnamon Whisky

SinFire  New Bottle 122x300 Review: Sinfire Cinnamon WhiskyOregon-based Hood River Distillers has recently rebranded Sinfire, a cinnamon whisky (no “e” on this one) that was launched only two years ago in February 2012. The highlight of the relaunch: “Best served as a 32-degree shot, Sinfire now features a thermochromic temperature-triggered color-changing label to help consumers know exactly when it reaches optimum temperature. The label also incorporates photochromic ink, which brightens the logo when exposed to UV lights.”

Well, then!

We’ve never sampled Sinfire (tagline: “an evil spirit”), so what better time than the present to give it a go?

Cinnamon-flavored whiskey doesn’t typically involve a ton of nuance, and Sinfire is pretty straightforward from the start. The nose is quite mild, more cinnamon toast than cinnamon straight from the jar. On the palate, it’s remarkably easygoing, with one of the lowest overall levels of spice I’ve encountered in this type of spirit. Oddly, it’s not as overwhelmingly sweet as you might expect but rather uses its buttery, creamy body to smooth out the roughness that’s typical of cinnamon whiskeys. The sweetness hits you mid-palate, more of a brown sugar, and the cinnamon pops up most presently on the moderately racy endgame.

Surprisingly well-made, Sinfire proves that you don’t have to blast out your customers’ sinuses with spices in order to craft a rich and soothing spirit. Hardly evil.

70 proof.

A- / $18 / hrdspirits.com

Review: Chicken Cock Flavored Whiskeys

chicken cock whiskey 525x762 Review: Chicken Cock Flavored Whiskeys

Chicken Cock!

I can’t do the origin story justice. Here it is in the distiller’s own words.

Originally established in 1856 in Paris, Kentucky, Chicken Cock quickly became a significant 19th century Bourbon brand. Forced to move production to Canada during Prohibition, Chicken Cock was smuggled across the border in tin cans, where it rose to fame as a popular pour at some of the era’s most famous speakeasies, including the eminent Cotton Club in Harlem. When patrons ordered a “Chicken Cock,” waiters would present the tin can tableside and ceremoniously open it to reveal the bottle of Chicken Cock Whiskey inside. With an aluminum package and bold, new flavors, Chicken Cock Whiskey is back to once again bend the rules in the 21st Century.

Returning to its southern roots, Chicken Cock is bottled in Charleston, South Carolina in three different varieties – Chicken Cock Southern Spiced Whiskey, Chicken Cock Cinnamon Whiskey, and Chicken Cock Root Beer Whiskey.  Each is a flavorful blend of all natural ingredients and 86 Proof American Whiskey. A salute to the legendary tin cans, the bottles are made of 100% aluminum to facilitate and retain the optimal temperature for sipping chilled shots or mixing signature cocktails. Whether in a Southern Spiked Tea (Southern Spiced & Sweet Tea), a Root Beer Julep, or a Chicken’s Inferno (Cinnamon & Ginger Beer), Chicken Cock is adding a new dimension of flavor and quality to Southern classics.

These three narrow aluminum cans o’ unspecified, flavored whiskey make quite a statement, with their boasting rooster and that unforgettable name emblazoned at the top. Here’s how they shake out. As noted above, each is bottled at 86 proof.

Chicken Cock Root Beer Flavored Whiskey – The nose is a perfect recreation of root beer, but the body mixes it in with some standard-grade, heavy-wood whiskey… and as you sip on it the whiskey takes over. What starts with a nicely biting, root beer character fades into little more than sawdusty lumberyard notes. It’s not unpleasant, and I expect root beer fans will get a little kick out of this, considering how easy it goes down in the end, although it ultimately has little of substance to say. B-

Chicken Cock Southern Spiced Flavored Whiskey – The spices in question appear to be vanilla and ginger, maybe a touch of cinnamon, giving this a bit of a pumpkin pie spice character to it. Not bad, and it’s more balanced with the whiskey than the root beer version, offering a sweet ‘n’ savoriness that’s pleasant on its own but blends well with mixers. B

Chicken Cock Cinnamon Flavored Whiskey – A quite credible cinnamon whiskey. The spice is present but not overwhelming and mouth-scorching like so many cinnamon-focused spirits. Again, the nose is strong and focused, with the body a looser conflagration of cinnamon spice and moderate wood notes. But here the cinnamon wins out, kicked with a touch of vanilla that complements the spicier notes well. B+

each $20 / chickencockwhiskey.com

Review: Eastside Distilling Burnside Bourbon and Marionberry Whiskey

burnsidebottle small 525x701 Review: Eastside Distilling Burnside Bourbon and Marionberry Whiskey

We’ve covered Portland-based Eastside Distillings’s masterful Burnside Double Barrel Bourbon before. Today we’re looking at a couple of its other products, including the 4 year old straight bourbon which Double Barrel is based on. Thoughts follow.

Eastside Distilling Burnside Bourbon 4 Years Old – Youthful, but not brash or underdone, this is a fruity example of a craft bourbon. The nose offers cinnamon-dusted apples, vanilla, and a little citrus character — oranges, mainly. Along with all of the above, more of that citrus comes through on the body, perhaps with a little mango on top of it. It’s not until the finish mostly that the mashbill makes itself, offering a gentle grain character that offers spicy rye notes and a cereal-like finish. Frosted Flakes, though, not Grape Nuts. Solid mouthfeel thanks to its 96 proof bottling strength. B+ / $25

Eastside Distilling Marionberry Whiskey – Eastside’s whiskey (it doesn’t say which) flavored with local Oregon marionberries and bottled at a slim 60 proof. A pretty maroon in color, surprisingly woody on the nose. Ample fruitiness on the palate — think strawberries, with just a touch of blueberry in there too — but tempered with some of whiskey’s fresh vanilla. Still, the finish is quite sugary and overwhelmingly jammy. That’s not a slight, but this is a far different drinking experience than the typical bourbon fan might be accustomed to. B / $34

eastsidedistilling.com

Review: Prairie Fire Hot Cinnamon Flavored Whiskey

prairie fire 225x300 Review: Prairie Fire Hot Cinnamon Flavored WhiskeyA Prairie Fire is actually a cocktail: A shot of whiskey with hot sauce in it. OK, not much of a cocktail, but it’s an alcoholic beverage of some sort.

Prairie Fire, the bottled spirit, is made with this cocktail in mind. Eschewing hot sauce for cinnamon, this product from the Iowa Distilling Company wants you to feel the burn on your lips but not so much in your belly. The fact that it’s neon red in color — certified color added — only adds to the impression of burning.

The color tells the whole story. It’s fully transparent, just tinted bright red. If there’s whiskey in here, you won’t see it or taste it. (IDC says only that it’s double distilled, presumably it is made with the company’s moonshine as a base.)

Hot stuff, to be sure. Grab your Chap-stick because the cinnamon sizzles as it hits your lips. The nose is bright and cinnamony, while the body offers a sort of cross between cinnamon toast and Hot Tamales. (In fact, the color may very well come from the same dye they use for the candy.) There’s not much else to say about Prairie Fire. It’s spicy and sweet and tastes just like a cinnamon spirit should. There’s not a whiff of whiskey to be found in it, but maybe that’s not such a terrible thing… though I would be curious to see what this would taste like with some actual whiskey character to it. 

70 proof.

B / $26 / iowadistilling.com

Review: Big House Bourbon and Big House Tupelo Honey

big house bourbon 153x300 Review: Big House Bourbon and Big House Tupelo HoneyUnderdog Spirits, in Livermore, California, brings you these two spirits, crafted to order by LDI. For the base bourbon, the 60% corn, 35% rye, 5% malted barley mashbill is aged for 6 years before bottling. Thoughts follow.

Big House Straight Bourbon Whiskey – At first blush, there’s quite a harsh nose here; I get some mint notes, but there’s also quite a bit of astringency that takes a long while to blow off. Eventually it does, leaving behind a somewhat racy, spicy, but curiously unstructured aroma. The body is fortunately more traditional, with huge vanilla caramel notes and ample sweetness. The short, lightly woody finish offers hints of roasted coffee beans. All in all it’s nothing shocking, but at this price (and 90 proof at that) it probably needn’t be. 90 proof. B / $17

Big House Tupelo Honey – The honey-flavored version of same. The much lighter color makes you think this will be heavy on the honey, but that’s not the case. It’s lighter primarily because it’s considerably lower in proof — 70 proof vs. Big House’s 90 proof. The honey is in fact dialed back, way back. The syrupy goodness is almost non-evident on the nose, and on the body it feels just barely there, added with an eyedropper perhaps. This approach works quite well with Big House, adding a more interesting sweetness that goes partway in correcting the above’s candy-focused character, but it’s so dialed down that you never get the sickly sweetness you can encounter with many other renditions of this whiskey classic.  As honey-flavored whiskeys go, Big House pulls this one off surprisingly well. B+ / $20

bighousebourbon.com

Review: Firefly White Lightning Moonshine and Apple Pie Moonshine

Firefly Moonshine Rocks 525x349 Review: Firefly White Lightning Moonshine and Apple Pie Moonshine

I’m a big fan of Firefly’s tea-flavored vodka, probably the best on the market. Recently the distillery, based in Wadmalaw Island, South Carolina, branched out into moonshine — unaged “raw corn whiskey,” available unflavored or in one of five different flavored versions. We got both the pure stuff and one of the flavors. Thoughts — surprising thoughts — follow. 

Firefly White Lightning Moonshine – Popcorn nose, almost buttery. From the sharp nose you might think you’re in for a rough and rustic body, but that’s not the case. This White Lightning is surprisingly silky, presumably sweetened but not overdone, this is spicy (over 100 proof) but flavorful, driven by its corn origins but mellowed out with a glazing of sugar. That’s not a slight. This may be moonshine, but it tempers its frontier heritage with a sweetness that’s wholly appropriate. 100.7 proof. B+

Firefly Apple Pie Moonshine – I’ve had apple pie-flavored spirits before, but this is the first time I’ve had one that gets all the components of the dessert in one little shot. It’s all here: apples, cinnamon, caramel, and pie crust. As with Firefly’s masterful tea-flavored vodka, this proves how flavored spirits can be crafted with intelligence, and without being crammed full of as much sugar as possible. This is sweet, but an apple pie is also sweet. Like a well-made pie, Firefly has figured out the balance of the equation (low alcohol doesn’t hurt here), and I have to give them props on that count. 60.3 proof. A

each $20 / fireflymoonshine.com

Review: Jack Daniel’s Winter Jack Tennessee Cider

jack daniels winter jack 137x300 Review: Jack Daniels Winter Jack Tennessee CiderI first encountered Winter Jack several years ago on a trip to Germany. There it was, this curious bottle set on the back bar in an outdoor Christmas market, where it was subtitled an “Apple Whiskey Punch.” Turns out the holiday-themed spirit has been popular in that country for a few years, and now, Winter Jack is finally making its way from Deutschland to America, rebranded as a “Tennessee Cider.” Same difference, I suppose, and in fact it’s the same product, just rebranded for its American release.

Winter Jack is a mix of apple cider liqueur and classic Jack Daniel’s whiskey. Emphasis, as you’ll see below, is on the cider liqueur.

The spirit pours a very pale, Chardonnay-like color. The nose offers cinnamon, applesauce, and honey, but it isn’t overpowering… a lot like sticking your nose into a glass of your kids’ juice. On the body, initially it’s quite mild as the nose would indicate, offering a simple apple juice/cider character that slowly builds to a more tart, fresh apple-driven finish. The spirit leaves you with quite a bit of sweetness, which is where the barest touches of caramel and vanilla show up, the thumbprint of JD turning out to be quite a latent one on this spirit. The overall effect is appealing, though it doesn’t leave much of a lasting impression. In the end, Winter Jack clearly prefers to let the cider liqueur do more of the talking, which is fine, I guess. You can always add more whiskey to suit your tastes, after all.

Intended to be served warm.

30 proof. Check the website below for availability in your state.

B / $18 / jackdaniels.com

Recipe: Knob Creek Smoked Maple Cocktails

Recently, we ran a review of the Knob Creek Smoked Maple Bourbon which Beam has offered forth this fall. We were also lucky enough to receive a recipe for an Old Fashioned for the upcoming holiday season courtesy of Iron Chef Michael Symon. It’s quite the tasty cocktail. However, not one to shy away from making a cocktail worthy of an Iron Chef, we also decided to take a stab at creating our own in celebration of the arrival of the 2014 NHL season. We don’t have the luxury of three celebrity judges to determine a winner, but leave your thoughts… or your own ideas… in the comments field!

Knob Creek Ol’ Fashioned Holiday Maple
Created by Michael Symon

Pinch of raw sugar
Orange peel
3 dashes bitters
1 ½ parts Knob Creek Smoked Maple bourbon
1 part Apple brandy
Drop a pinch of raw sugar, orange peel, and 3 dashes bitters into a rocks glass and muddle. Add Knob Creek Smoked Maple bourbon and Apple brandy. Stir with ice.

The Hockey Puck
(a Drinkhacker original)

2 parts Knob Creek Smoked Maple bourbon
1 part Nocello walnut liqueur
1 dash bitters
Cinnamon Stick (for garnish)
Add bitters, then Knob Creek Smoked Maple bourbon and finally Nocello liqueur. Serve neat or on the rocks with a side of plain cake donuts.

Review: Knob Creek Smoked Maple Bourbon

Knob Creek Smoked Maple 525x794 Review: Knob Creek Smoked Maple Bourbon

Finally, someone’s doing the maple-flavored whiskey thing right.

Let me step back. In general I’m ambivalent toward flavored whiskeys. I don’t much see the point, as if I wanted flavor with my whiskey I’d just mix up a cocktail. Still, shortcuts are shortcuts, and there’s something to be said for having your favorite mix pre-bottled and ready to go.

The reason for the success isn’t hard to see. This is overproof Knob Creek (normally 100 proof) with a fairly light touch of maple syrup flavor, instead of the all-too-common other way around: Syrup that’s had a dash of whiskey added to it. Even with the additions, Knob Creek Smoked Maple comes through at 90 proof, still well above the typical 70 to 80 proof you find in this category.

The results are impressive. While pancake syrup fills the room when you crack open the bottle (sealed with the traditional Knob Creek black wax), but that’s where the maple effect is its strongest. Nosing an aerated glass brings out Bourbon first, maple syrup considerably further down the list. On the palate, the mouthfeel is solid — a bit more gummy than straight whiskey, but plenty pleasant. The maple character is there, all right, making it tough to pick out specific notes in the Bourbon, but in the end, after the pancake party is over, I find myself left with citrus peel, marshmallow, ice cream cone, and toffee characters on the finish. The one thing I don’t get here: Smoked anything.

Now I’m the kind of guy who prefers pancakes with butter only, so for me to say Knob Creek’s Smoked Maple is a worthwhile product, even a rather good one, is like the Pope saying he isn’t going to judge gay priests. Er, wait a sec.

B+ / $31 / knobcreek.com

Review: Jim Beam Maple

Jim Beam Maple 113x300 Review: Jim Beam MapleOK, I like maple syrup as much as the next guy (well, probably not as much, to be honest), but at some point everybody’s got to hit a breaking point.

Maple has revealed itself to be one of the Next Big Things in spirits flavorings, and if you like the idea of literally pouring syrup down your gullet, they’re for you. Ultra-sweet and, well, syrupy, maple whiskeys are designed to rot the teeth right out of today’s increasingly sweet-toothed consumer while giving them a little buzz along the way.

Jim Beam Maple keeps things close to a tried-and-true formula. The aroma of syrup wafts out of the bottle as soon as it’s opened, and it doesn’t let up. The flavor is thick, lightly woody (perhaps the only touch of actual whiskey shining through), and unbelievably sweet. The finish lasts for days, matched only by the hysterical stickiness that coats the glass like glue. Is it whiskey? Is it vodka? Is it really just syrup? (There’s no heat to speak of.) Impossible to answer any of the above at this level of flavoring intensity.

Maple spirits are becoming commonplace to the point of market saturation. That’s fine if you’re into that kind of experience, but sadly, Jim Beam Maple just doesn’t do anything to elevate the game.

70 proof.

C+ / $16 / jimbeam.com

Review: Jim Beam Red Stag Hardcore Cider

red stag hardcore cider 109x300 Review: Jim Beam Red Stag Hardcore CiderThe latest addition to the ever-expanding line of Red Stag by Jim Beam is this, called Hardcore Cider. You don’t need a lot of imagination to figure out this is infused with apple cider “and other natural flavors.” Apple is a natural complement for bourbon (and plenty of cocktails mix whiskey and cider), so this combination makes sense.

On the nose, the spirit is full of deep apple character — baked apples in a touch of cinnamon syrup, like grandma used to make. The body follows suit: This is a whiskey where the flavoring takes the reins and runs with it. The bourbon element of this Red Stag is elusive to the point of absence. If the fruit were a bit brighter, you could be excused for thinking you were drinking Calvados. A touch of vanilla at the very end reminds you it’s been in a barrel, but vanilla is such a natural counterpoint for apples that it doesn’t immediately come across as a bourbon element.

This is not a bad product, but the relative absence of bourbon flavors — even with 80 proof whiskey as the base — make me wish for something that showcased the whiskey along with the cider. That said, I’d mix this with ginger ale or use it as a base for a punch and see what happens.

80 proof.

B / $18 / jimbeam.com

Review: Wild Turkey Spiced

Wild Turkey Spiced Bottle Shot 525x1101 Review: Wild Turkey Spiced

Spiced rum? Old news. Spiced whiskey is the future, bringing all the goodies of the baking cabinet to Kentucky’s finest.

Wild Turkey is the latest to get into this game, bringing the traditional islandesque spices you’ll find adorning Captain Morgan and the rest of his crew to the world of Bourbon. There’s not a lot of information about the underlying Bourbon here — it’s standard Wild Turkey, but bottled at 86 proof with no age statement to be found (not surprising, of course). There’s not a lot of information about the spiced, either — only “spice and other natural flavors” are noted on the label — but a cursory taste reveals cinnamon and cloves, plus more vanilla than you’d expect from a Bourbon of this pedigree.

In fact, the nose is all vanilla, all the time — it’s so thick it comes across as a little bit synthetic, a common problem in vanilla-infused spirits. The palate offers more to play with, a baking spice character that, for once, doesn’t bury its base spirit in sugar. Here the cinnamon/clove mix is evident — maybe even a little ginger in there? — but Wild Turkey’s deep wood character doesn’t get drowned out. It’s with you from start to finish, both imbuing the front of the palate with some depth and providing a long, lightly smoky/bacony finish that reminds you you’re drinking whiskey and not rum.

Sure, this isn’t a product I’d likely sip straight, but i can see myriad opportunities to work with it in punches, holiday cocktails, and hot drinks. Worth a shot at this price.

B / $23 / wildturkeybourbon.com

Review: Canadian Mist Flavors – Peach, Cinnamon, Maple

canadian mist Cinnamon Mist 105x300 Review: Canadian Mist Flavors   Peach, Cinnamon, MapleCanadian Mist is well known for its very affordable, basic blended whisky, so it makes sense that it would leap into the flavored whisky business along with so many others. CM arrives with a whole new line of ultra-cheap flavored spirits (“Canadian Mist” is actually hard to find on the label), each of which blends various flavored liqueurs with a Canadian Mist base. Here’s how three members of the group (all but Vanilla Mist) shake out. (Spoiler: Far better than I was expecting.)

Each is 70 proof, with caramel color added.

Canadian Mist Peach Mist – Can you out-SoCo Southern Comfort? This mix of peach liqueur and Canadian Mist is a credible knockoff, packing less sweetness and more of a whisky kick than the standard Southern Comfort bottling, and it lacks all that astringency. Surprisingly easygoing, this fruity number offers modest, not overpowering peach on the nose, backed up with vanilla notes. That vanilla is what really hits you on the body, where the peach character takes more of a back seat along with the mild, almost honeyed character of the Canadian Mist. Not much to it, but there doesn’t really need to be. There’s plenty of balance in the spirit as it stands. It doesn’t do a whole lot, but what it does, it does well enough to recommend. B+

Canadian Mist Cinnamon Mist – Cinnamon liqueur, of course, blended with CM. The description on the bottle is a little disarming… “hot cinnamon & sweet cream vanilla that has a smooth finish of warm brown spice.” Warm brown spice? Errr… maybe it’s a Canadian thing. Very mild bite here. As with the peach whisky, this is understated with relatively easy cinnamon character, more than a hint but less than a mouthful. It’s definitely more pleasant than most cinnamon-flavored spirits, which are spiked to within an inch of their life and specifically designed to burn your tonsils off. Lots of vanilla on the back end, though the balance isn’t quite as well-done as the Peach Mist. Still, it’s one of the better cinnamon whiskys on the market. B

Cinnamon Mist Maple Mist – This one has far more of the sweet stuff than the two above. On the nose and on the tongue, all you get is maple syrup coating the mouth. That’d be great if I was having pancakes, but in the after hours it’s just far too much. Punchy and heavy with (authentic) maple syrup, the body is enormous and the finish is overwhelming. That’s not entirely CM’s fault, all maple-flavored spirits (at least the ones I’ve tried) end up this way. But that doesn’t make it right. C-

each $10 / canadianmist.com

Review: Dewar’s Highlander Honey

dewars highlander honey 71x300 Review: Dewars Highlander HoneyThe honey-infused-whiskey trend continues unabated with Dewar’s latest, Highlander Honey. It’s notable because — Drambuie aside — it’s the first honey-flavored whisky from Scotland. The ruckus its release caused is why “whisky” isn’t in very large letterson the label — although the bottle will look extremely familiar to Dewar’s fans.

A simple blend of Dewar’s White Label, honey, and unspecified natural flavors, it’s a solid addition to the honey-flavored whiskey market, particularly if you’re more into Scotch than Bourbon.

Let’s delve into the spirit itself. For starters, the nose doesn’t much let on that there’s honey in here at all. Fresh grain, some citrus, and unspecified sweetness all hit the nostrils. There’s even some smokiness… altogether nothing you wouldn’t get from a solid blend.

On the tongue, the honey’s more evident. Modestly sweet but clearly spiked with the stuff, it complements the natural sweetness of the Scotch without overpowering things with sugar. Of course, White Label is hardly the pinnacle of blended Scotch, so don’t go thinking you’re wandering into the top shelf. But the very light smokiness in the Dewar’s melds rather nicely with the honey sweetness. All in all, it’s extremely drinkable, laced with the light nuance of orange oil and a touch of heather.

Die-hard Scotch drinkers probably won’t think twice about Highlander Honey, but it’s actually a surprisingly versatile spirit that will work both in cocktails and even as the occasional after-dinner tipple. If sweet stuff’s in your wheelhouse, give it a try.

80 proof.

B+ / $25 / bacardilimited.com

Review: Whiskeys of Fog’s End Distillery

Fogs End White Dog 300 2 128x300 Review: Whiskeys of Fogs End DistilleryDown in Gonzales, California — where, based on my travels, there’s plenty of fog — Fog’s End Distillery makes unique craft whiskeys, of a sort. These are all made, as the company’s owner Craig Pakish explains, with the “no cook, sour mash” method. But there’s a twist: While corn and rye are both used in various products, all of Fog’s End’s whiskeys include sugar in the mash. In fact, all of these spirits are half sugar, half grain.

What does that make these products? To its credit, Fog’s End does not call any of them “whiskey,” but I’m at a loss as to how to describe them as well. Only one of the products is aged. Most of them are straight off the still.

Anyway, arguments over semantics and monikers aside, here’s what you’ll find if you crack into one of Fog’s End’s inimitable spirits.

Fog’s End Distillery California MoonShine – “Made right on the left coast,” this 50% corn/50% sugar whiskey is moonshine through and through. And how. Intense popcorn notes on the nose lead to a pure, overpowering white lightning. Notes of coal, honeycomb, and fresh linens can be found on the back end, but getting there is a hell of a ride. 100 proof. B- / $30

Fog’s End White Dog – Made from a mash of 50% rye and 50% sugar, its much, much softer than the MoonShine, almost innocuous with a very mild body. The sugar is more than evident, with a sort of maple syrup character in the way it all comes together. Notes of apples and cherries add nuance. Altogether it interesting stuff for a white whiskey (of sorts). Use as an alternative to vodka. 80 proof. B / $34

Fog’s End Monterey Rye – Quite a misleading name, this is actually the white dog (50% rye, 50% sugar), aged for an unstated time and then bottled at a higher 90 proof. Definitely a step up from the white dog in complexity, the wood influence adds a significant caramel character and the extra alcohol gives it some heft. Still very sweet, but with more of a sense of balance. Some notes of cloves and cinnamon on the back end, but like the white dog, it leaves quite the sugary finish. B+ / $43

Fog’s End Primo Agua Ardiente – Literally “cousin’s fire water.” 50% corn and 50% sugar-based white whiskey, spiked with chili peppers, unaged but with a light yellow tint to it. Very spicy, but not overpowering the way some pepper-spiked spirits can be. The heat sticks in the back of throat, which has the secondary effect of drowning out pretty much everything else in the spirit. Fun for parties. 80 proof. B- / $34

fogsenddistillery.com

Review: Black Velvet Toasted Caramel Canadian Whisky

Black Velvet Toasted Caramel 200x300 Review: Black Velvet Toasted Caramel Canadian WhiskyA funny thing happens when I try to type “Canadian.” I always mistype “Candian” instead. Never has that been a more apropos typo than with Black Velvet’s Toasted Caramel Whisky.

Flavored with a hefty dose of “natural toasted caramel flavor,” this sugar bomb is so dense with sugar it’s actually difficult to swallow it. The nose cues you in for what you’re about to get hit with, but the mouthfeel is something else. It’s so sugary I swear you can feel the grains of sugar grinding around in your mouth. The “toasted caramel” (which means what, exactly?) is something akin to burned Bananas Foster, and there’s a touch of a woody finish on the end that reminds you that this is indeed whisky and not caramel-flavored vodka.

Sweet tooths only need apply.

70 proof.

D+ / $11 / blackvelvetwhisky.com

Review: Georgetown Trading Co. Pow-Wow Botanical Rye

pow wow botanical rye 116x300 Review: Georgetown Trading Co. Pow Wow Botanical RyeFrom Georgetown Trading Company (the importer of the masterful John L. Sullivan Irish Whiskey), comes this extreme oddity — a flavored/infused rye whiskey.

Flavored whiskeys are growing in popularity as a category, but they’re mainly Bourbon or Irish, and honey and cinnamon are the predominant flavoring agents. Pow-Wow Botanical Rye is a straight rye whiskey that’s infused with saffron, orange peel, and other whole botanicals (not oils or other flavoring agents), which makes it doubly unique in the world o’ whiskey. (The specific mashbill is not specified, nor is the barrel aging program; the whiskey is warehoused in Kentucky.) Continue reading

Review: XXX Shine Salted Caramel Corn Whiskey

Shine Family Salted Caramel Whiskey 239x300 Review: XXX Shine Salted Caramel Corn WhiskeyHow do you take the edge off of white whiskey? You can put it in a barrel for 6 years or so, or you can drop in some flavoring and sell it tomorrow.

Shine (aka “XXX Shine”) makes a straight white dog, but it also makes two flavored versions, a tea flavored whiskey and this, a white dog flavored with salted caramel.

Continue reading

Review: Crown Royal Maple Finished Canadian Whisky

crown royal maple finished 255x300 Review: Crown Royal Maple Finished Canadian Whisky“Finished” has a particular meaning in the world of whisky, normally implying that a whisky has been moved from one type of barrel to another, usually a different type of wood or, more commonly, a barrel that once held another spirit or wine. “Maple finished” has actually been done before: Woodford Reserve made a maple-finished limited release Bourbon in 2010.

That’s not what Crown Royal Maple Finished Canadian Whisky is.

Continue reading