Category Archives: Canadian Whisky

Review: Masterson’s 10 Year Old Straight Barley and 12 Year Old Straight Wheat Whiskeys

MS Trio 525x601 Review: Mastersons 10 Year Old Straight Barley and 12 Year Old Straight Wheat Whiskeys

The folks at Masterson’s — made by California-based parent company 35 Maple Street — make what has already become a cult rye whiskey, Masterson’s 10 Year Old Straight Rye. Now the company is back with an even stranger pair of siblings: two well-aged whiskeys, one 100% wheat, one 100% barley.

Both are straight whiskeys made from 100% of their respective grains, sourced from Canada and bottled in the U.S. How do they measure up against the masterful Masterson’s Rye? Thoughts follow.

Masterson’s 12 Year Old Straight Wheat Whiskey - Modest straw in color, the unique nose is immediately hard to place. What comes across are notes of butterscotch, mint, woodsy cedar closet, and a touch of mothballs (not in a bad way). The body is sweeter than expected, with more of a sense of balance than you might expect from the quirky nose. There’s more of a graham cracker character on the palate, with notes of pear, cinnamon, and vanilla. It’s got quite a bit of bite — this is 100 proof stuff — but that masks the relative thinness of the body. This is a whiskey that is initially a little confusing because its flavors are so unexpected… but it grows on you quite a bit after you spend some time with it, which I recommend you do. Reviewed: Batch #1, bottle #3538. A- / $62

Masterson’s 10 Year Old Straight Barley Whiskey – 100% unmalted barley, an extreme rarity in the whiskey world. Well, I disliked this at WhiskyFest and I still dislike it now that I’ve had more time to spend with it. The nose offers an immature, bready character, weighted down with hospital notes. On the body, more of the same — but intense. The stock is rough, the palate leaden with the essence of wood oils, mashed grains, chimney soot, and burnt toast. Something hints at intrigue on the finish — a bit of honey and vanilla, perhaps — but it’s not nearly enough to elevate this beyond a misfiring curiosity. 92 proof. Reviewed: Batch #1, bottle #6045. C / $62

35maplestreet.com

Review: Collingwood 21 Year Old Rye Canadian Whisky

Collingwood Rye 21 Year Old high res 525x787 Review: Collingwood 21 Year Old Rye Canadian Whisky

Who, who, whoooo is putting out 21 year old rye? At a price of 70 bucks (or less)? Collingwood, that’s who.

Collingwood is best known for bottling its spirits in what look like oversized perfume bottles, but it should be known for the quality of the spirits inside. Standard Collingwood, a young Canadian blend, offers a huge amount of flavor for a whisky that’s just three years or so old. At 27 bucks it’s a steal.

Now comes Collingwood 21, a 100% malted rye with a full 21 years of age on it, aged primarily in new oak barrels and finished in toasted maplewood barrels. There’s plenty going on here. The nose offers rich wood character, butterscotch, and hints of maple syrup. It’s quite enticing and invites you into sipping away, revealing more syrup and butterscotch notes, plus intriguing notes of orange peel, evergreen, and some light lumberyard. The finish is woody but far from overdone, an engaging rush that brings along hints of that rye spiciness, something akin to a clove-spiked orange. Dangerously drinkable.

This is a one-time-only limited release. Grab it while you can. 

80 proof.

A / $70 / collingwoodwhisky.com  [BUY IT NOW FROM CASKERS]

Tasting Report: WhiskyFest San Francisco 2013

WhiskyFest 2013 is now in the books, and my what an embarrassment of riches this show was. While I heard grousing about the show not having as many hits as usual (most of the independent Scotch bottlers like Samaroli were absent), I managed to find a ton of them. Driven this year perhaps by a ruthless attempt to avoid lesser products (one industry bigwig, with all seriousness, suggested I give Johnnie Walker Red Label a try), it didn’t take much doing to suss out some really great whiskeys being poured. Who can complain when Julian Van Winkle is pouring his best stuff, after all?

It was quite the global event this year, with numerous whiskeys from Japan, Canada, and Ireland on tap that you don’t normally see at shows. And more and more craft distillers, like Masterson’s and Smooth Ambler, are taking to shows to give people a taste of something new.

Anyway, as usual it was a great evening with old friends and new ones – both of the whiskey and the human variety. Thoughts follow.

American Whiskey / Bourbon
Smooth Ambler Old Scout Ten / A- / some menthol, caramel with a dusty finish
Masterson’s 12 Year Wheat / A- / big wood, cherries, a fun whisky
Masterson’s 10 Year Barley / C- / funky mint and rubber notes, unripe banana, not at all to my liking tonight
Wild Turkey Kentucky Spirit / A- / lovely sweetness without being saccharine, tried just to say hi to Jimmy and Eddie Russell, both pouring
Jack Daniel’s Sinatra Select / A- / a new limited edition from JD, the same spirit but aged in barrels that have been “grooved” with extra cuts to expose more wood surface; as expected, this is like JD, but woodier; not bad at all
Pappy Van Winkle 15 Years Old / A / still maturing, with a little burn
Pappy Van Winkle 20 Years Old / A+ / Pappy at its best, raisins, wood, big body… just perfect
Pappy Van Winkle 23 Years Old / A / you can finally see the age on this spirit at 23, where the balance is just starting to turn toward too much wood

Scotch Whisky
Glen Grant The Major’s Reserve / B / chewy barley and rubber bands
The Balvenie Single Barrel 12 Years Old / A- / cake, nuts, smoke, malt
Bruichladdich Cuvee 382 La Berenice / A+ / best spirit at the show, aged in American oak for 21 years, then finished in Chateau Yquem barrels; liquid gold, sweet and savory in perfect balance
Bruichladdich Black Art 3 22 Years Old / B+ / always a funky expression, bristly and huge this year, with a smoky, old-world character
Bruichladdich Octomore 5.1 / A- / is Octomore losing its ability to shock me? This struck me as plenty peaty but not overdone, with evergreen and charcoal notes
Buchanan’s Red Seal / A- / Buchanan’s first WhiskyFest; a peaty blend with some citrus and sweetness, good balance
Cutty Sark Prohibition Edition / B+ / a new release from Cutty; very mild, surprisingly malty, with fresh grain and wood notes
Glenfarclas Family Cask 1973 / A / hearty sherry character, drinking beautifully
Glenfarclas Family Cask 1983 / B / dusty with lots of wood; couldn’t be more different than the ‘73
Compass Box Great King Street Artist’s Blend / B / overcooked, unthrilling
Compass Box Delilah’s 20th Anniversary Limited Edition / B+ / bottled as a tribute to a famed Chicago area bar, matured partly in new oak barrels (rare for Scotch); bourbon-like character, peppery with lots of wood, caramel notes

Irish Whiskey
Jameson’s Rarest Vintage Reserve / A / always a standout, this beautiful bottling (~26 years old) features lovely spicy notes beneath a sweet core
Midleton Barry Crockett Edition / A- / a vatting of 7 to 22 year old spirits; more rustic than the Jameson, chewy grain notes, still fun

Canadian Whisky
Wiser’s 18 Years Old / A- / mellow, well developed, sultry finish
Lot No. 40 / B- / a 100% rye bottling, a powerhouse of rubber, pungent basil and cherry notes

Japanese Whiskey
Hakushu Heavily Peated / B+ / not at all “heavy” in my mind, good balance with citrus notes
Nikka Taketsuru 17 Years Old / B+ / ample cereal notes
Nikka Taketsuru 12 Years Old / A / great balance of grain and honey, a standout

Brandy
Gran Duque De Alba XO 18 Years Old / A- / Spanish brandy; big coffee and licorice notes; intriguing and powerful
Gran Duque De Alba Oro 25 Years Old / B+ / a little overblown, same character as the XO, but just too much, too hoary

Review: Canadian Mist Flavors – Peach, Cinnamon, Maple

canadian mist Cinnamon Mist 105x300 Review: Canadian Mist Flavors   Peach, Cinnamon, MapleCanadian Mist is well known for its very affordable, basic blended whisky, so it makes sense that it would leap into the flavored whisky business along with so many others. CM arrives with a whole new line of ultra-cheap flavored spirits (“Canadian Mist” is actually hard to find on the label), each of which blends various flavored liqueurs with a Canadian Mist base. Here’s how three members of the group (all but Vanilla Mist) shake out. (Spoiler: Far better than I was expecting.)

Each is 70 proof, with caramel color added.

Canadian Mist Peach Mist – Can you out-SoCo Southern Comfort? This mix of peach liqueur and Canadian Mist is a credible knockoff, packing less sweetness and more of a whisky kick than the standard Southern Comfort bottling, and it lacks all that astringency. Surprisingly easygoing, this fruity number offers modest, not overpowering peach on the nose, backed up with vanilla notes. That vanilla is what really hits you on the body, where the peach character takes more of a back seat along with the mild, almost honeyed character of the Canadian Mist. Not much to it, but there doesn’t really need to be. There’s plenty of balance in the spirit as it stands. It doesn’t do a whole lot, but what it does, it does well enough to recommend. B+

Canadian Mist Cinnamon Mist – Cinnamon liqueur, of course, blended with CM. The description on the bottle is a little disarming… “hot cinnamon & sweet cream vanilla that has a smooth finish of warm brown spice.” Warm brown spice? Errr… maybe it’s a Canadian thing. Very mild bite here. As with the peach whisky, this is understated with relatively easy cinnamon character, more than a hint but less than a mouthful. It’s definitely more pleasant than most cinnamon-flavored spirits, which are spiked to within an inch of their life and specifically designed to burn your tonsils off. Lots of vanilla on the back end, though the balance isn’t quite as well-done as the Peach Mist. Still, it’s one of the better cinnamon whiskys on the market. B

Cinnamon Mist Maple Mist – This one has far more of the sweet stuff than the two above. On the nose and on the tongue, all you get is maple syrup coating the mouth. That’d be great if I was having pancakes, but in the after hours it’s just far too much. Punchy and heavy with (authentic) maple syrup, the body is enormous and the finish is overwhelming. That’s not entirely CM’s fault, all maple-flavored spirits (at least the ones I’ve tried) end up this way. But that doesn’t make it right. C-

each $10 / canadianmist.com

Review: Pike Creek Canadian Whisky

pike creek whiskey 118x300 Review: Pike Creek Canadian WhiskyNewly acquired from Corby Distilleries — a growing Canadian whisky producer whose products continue to be difficult to find in the U.S. — by Pernod Ricard, Pike Creek is the brainchild of one Don Livermore, who has a Ph.D. in — wait for it — wood science.

That science has clearly taught Livermore a thing or two about making good whisky, and with Pike Creek he has made the exceptional decision of aging his spirit in Vintage Port barrels. This is a trick we’ve seen repeatedly (and wonderfully) with Bourbon and Scotch, but it’s a new one for Canadian.

Matured for an unspecified time in Ontario, Canada, the whisky is bottled at 80 proof. And now it is finally going to be available in the U.S.

Results: Exceptional. The nose is immediately sweet, with caramel notes but also cooked apples and some spice. On the tongue, it’s racier than you think, the rye backbone (common to most Canadian whiskys) giving the sweet body a little heft. Graham crackers, milk chocolate, and golden raisins fill out the finish, along with just enough heat to make things interesting. Let it open up in the glass for long enough and you get lots of citrus oil notes, too. This is a complex spirit that I could sip on all day. Well done.

A / $32 / goodeatsfor.me

Review: Black Velvet Toasted Caramel Canadian Whisky

Black Velvet Toasted Caramel 200x300 Review: Black Velvet Toasted Caramel Canadian WhiskyA funny thing happens when I try to type “Canadian.” I always mistype “Candian” instead. Never has that been a more apropos typo than with Black Velvet’s Toasted Caramel Whisky.

Flavored with a hefty dose of “natural toasted caramel flavor,” this sugar bomb is so dense with sugar it’s actually difficult to swallow it. The nose cues you in for what you’re about to get hit with, but the mouthfeel is something else. It’s so sugary I swear you can feel the grains of sugar grinding around in your mouth. The “toasted caramel” (which means what, exactly?) is something akin to burned Bananas Foster, and there’s a touch of a woody finish on the end that reminds you that this is indeed whisky and not caramel-flavored vodka.

Sweet tooths only need apply.

70 proof.

D+ / $11 / blackvelvetwhisky.com

Review: Crown Royal Maple Finished Canadian Whisky

crown royal maple finished 255x300 Review: Crown Royal Maple Finished Canadian Whisky“Finished” has a particular meaning in the world of whisky, normally implying that a whisky has been moved from one type of barrel to another, usually a different type of wood or, more commonly, a barrel that once held another spirit or wine. “Maple finished” has actually been done before: Woodford Reserve made a maple-finished limited release Bourbon in 2010.

That’s not what Crown Royal Maple Finished Canadian Whisky is.

Continue reading

Review: Crown Royal XR Extra Rare – 2012 LaSalle Distillery Release

In 2006 Crown Royal released its first XR bottling, a whisky that didn’t joke when it used the “extra rare” moniker on the label. Crafted from whiskys salvaged from its Waterloo distillery, which had actually burned down, it’s safe to say that if you haven’t picked up the 2006 Crown Royal XR by now, you aren’t going to.

Now Crown is back with a new version of XR, this one from its LaSalle Distillery. LaSalle did not burn down, but the whisky remains a limited release bottling that will be on sale for only a limited time. We got a sample. Here’s how it comes across.

Light and fruity on the nose, this smells a bit like very young Bourbon, fresh and vibrant. Not much wood to be found. This is backed up on the tongue: Very fruity, with apple and banana up front, nougat, bread, and biscuit characteristics. Rye grain comes along on the finish. Not nearly as woody as the Waterloo edition, and very clean. For this price, though, I’d like to see a bit more complexity.

80 proof.

A- / $130 / crownroyal.com

crown royal xr 2012 lasalle edition Review: Crown Royal XR Extra Rare   2012 LaSalle Distillery Release

Review: Pendleton 1910 Aged 12 Years Canadian Rye Whisky

With 1910 Pendleton (based in Hood River, Oregon) takes its Canadian whisky upmarket, bottling this 100% rye after a lengthy 12 years in oak. (The name is a reference to the first ever Pendleton Round-Up rodeo, which took place 102 years ago.)

I’ve previously discussed the standard, blended Pendleton bottling as overwhelmingly sweet, but things are more mellow with this expression. Intensely fruity, it offers lots of thick cherry notes, orange marmalade, and well-integrated spice throughout. Sweetness is still there in the form of a bit of butterscotch syrup, but it’s not overwhelming in the way regular Pendleton is.

Good balance and a strong but not overpowering body. Surprisingly mellow finish considering this is a 100% rye spirit.

80 proof.

A- / $40 / hrdspirits.com

pendleton 1910 Review: Pendleton 1910 Aged 12 Years Canadian Rye Whisky

Review: Tap 357 Canadian Maple Rye Whisky

The name says it all, pretty much: Canadian Rye whisky (a blend of whiskys aged 3 to 7 years — the 3, 5, and 7 refer to barrel ages) blended with Quebecois Canada 1 Light maple syrup (and caramel color). Distilled four times, it is aged in used Bourbon barrels and bottled at an odd 81 proof.

Results are significantly heavier on the Maple than the Rye. Deceptively light in color, the nose exudes the rich aroma of the forest, smoldering coals, pine cones, and wet leaves, all backed up with maple syrupy sweetness. This character hangs with you for a long while. Consumed neat, it’s got an epic finish you won’t soon forget.

There is whiskey character here, but it’s tough to peg it as Canadian rye — or any rye, or anything else specific, for that matter. Instead it comes off with more of a vague graininess somewhere in the middle of the experience, almost more like a dark beer extract than whiskey. But hey, maple syrup is a tough thing to do battle with.

Consumed solo this is all a bit much, but I can see how Tap 357 would make an exemplary ingredient for one of those modern cocktails where the sweetness comes from something other than simple sugar.

81 proof.

B / $36 / tap357.com [BUY IT NOW FROM CASKERS]

 Review: Tap 357 Canadian Maple Rye Whisky

Review: Fireball Cinnamon Whisky

“It tastes like heaven, burns like hell.”

Cinnamon spice isn’t usually what people have in mind when they say a whiskey “burns,” but this 66-proof flavored oddity, made in Canada and bottled by Kentucky’s Sazerac Company, certainly doesn’t have much going on in the alco-burn department. But if you’re a fan of Hot Tamales candy and over the age of 21, you’re in luck: Fireball has managed to create a dead solid rendition of that confection.

There’s just no mistaking this whisky from the get-go. The nose is full of grated cinnamon and little else. This carries over to the body: Full of spice, a nice slug of sugar, and a long, lingering, cinnamon burn. Imagine crushing up Red Hots and steeping them in lower-proof alcohol — any alcohol will do, as Fireball doesn’t have a distinct whisky taste aside from a bit of brown sugar — and drink.

And yet, surprisingly, this isn’t a half-bad spirit. It’s not much of a departure from cinnamon schnapps, but the balance is right and the tastes are authentic. Candy-coated, to be sure, but with a week to go ’til Christmas, who’s complaining?

B+ / $17 / fireballwhisky.com

fireball cinnamon whisky Review: Fireball Cinnamon Whisky

Review: Rich & Rare Reserve Blended Canadian Whisky

Sazerac’s Rich & Rare Canadian Whisky is a fast-growing brand — the fastest-growing U.S.-bottled Canadian brand last year — but one that is available in only about a dozen states right now. It’s also dirt cheap: The standard bottling sells for about $7.50.

The line is already expanding to add a Reserve bottling which will sell for all of $10 to $14 when it’s released this month.

This whisky — no age statement, 80 proof — is a brilliant orange in color, and citrus is the dominant flavor on the palate. It’s sweet but not cloying, with rich, sherried fruitiness to it — orange, plums, and grilled peaches. The finish is driven by the wood — caramel and cotton candy notes — but it goes out clean. While rye is obviously a component here, it’s not a dominant one: Spiciness is limited largely to the nose, where you get a touch of herbs, and a fleeting hint of it on the finish.

All told, it’s easygoing but surprisingly alive and balanced for a whisky that will probably set you back all of 13 bucks.

A- / $13 / sazerac.com

 Review: Rich & Rare Reserve Blended Canadian Whisky

 

Review: Masterson’s 10 Year Old Straight Rye Whiskey

100% rye: an oddity. 100% rye from Canada, blended with Colorado-sourced water, and bottled in Sonoma, California — a real oddity.

Technically a Canadian whisky, this big rye is named after Old West lawman William “Bat” Masterson — a man who, somehow, has returned from the grave he entered in 1921 in order to put his signature on these bottles. The distillery, 35 Maple Street, is owned by Sonoma’s famed Sebastiani family. This is their first foray into whiskey.

Wine country royalty and Masterson’s autograph and picture aside, let’s look at what’s inside: As noted, 100% rye, aged for a full decade in cask. 86 proof, perfect for an old rye.

The nose is immediately huge, full of caramel, citrus, and wood notes. On the palate, even bigger: Incredibly sweet, and delightfully spicy: Cinnamon and allspice, fresh orange (not peel), with a tinge of something akin to a Moroccan spice blend lacing things up. The finish brings the essence of raisins and a drying touch, but it’s a little overwhelming in its sweetness. This kind of sugar isn’t something you often see in a rye — particularly a 100% rye — but for the most part it works. I’d love to see just a touch more balance (a la WhistlePig) in the end, but even for a bit of a sugar bomb, it’s awfully well made.

Reviewed: Batch #3, Bottle #779.

A- / $79 / mastersonsrye.com [BUY IT NOW FROM CASKERS]

mastersons rye 10 years old Review: Mastersons 10 Year Old Straight Rye Whiskey

Review: Forty Creek Barrel Select and Double Barrel Reserve Canadian Whisky

Canadian whisky outfit Forty Creek has been winning awards hand over fist for its high-quality whiskys, available at reasonable prices. We took at look at the company’s two current releases (another is coming soon), to see what all the fuss was about.

Forty Creek Barrel Select Canadian Whisky – A real slow burner. There is honey on the nose, and more on the tongue. It slips down easy, with a touch of bite. Rye? Heavy barrel toast? Finished in sherry casks, these winey notes are muted in favor of that honeyed sweetness and more grain on the finish. It’s an interesting juxtaposition of flavor — the extremely feminine sweetness colliding with rugged, frontier character. Complicated but as unbalanced as the above description would suggest. B+ / $25

Forty Creek Double Barrel Reserve Canadian Whisky – Double Barrel’s recipe works like this: Rye, corn, and barley whiskys are distilled and aged separately, then they are married together and aged again in first run ex-Bourbon barrels. The results are night and day vs. Barrel Select, a silky and velvety whisky with big vanilla notes. Barrel Select’s honey character is still in play but now it takes on a more evolved and refined character. A big winner. A / $50

fortycreekwhisky.com

Review: Collingwood Canadian Whisky

Never mind what’s inside Collingwood: You don’t get very far without admiring the bottle. I know I’m a sucker for a nice decanter, but this thing is ridiculous, like an overgrown Chanel bottle or a glass, whisky-filled Zippo.

But on to the spirit within: This whisky is, to be blunt, unlike any I’ve ever tasted. A blend of two whiskys, aged in oak for three-plus years, and finished in toasted maplewood casks, it is sweet yet earthy and deeply wood-inflected. The nose: Woody and traditional — albeit with the addition of a little perfume — but closer to Bourbon than most Canadian whiskys. On the palate, the upfront offers a brown sugar character, but the sweetness is muted by wood. It’s not overwhelming in the way some hoary Bourbons can be, but simply mellowed out.

The ultimate effect as this washes over your palate is incredibly hard to describe. There is applesauce with cinnamon, butterscotch, cedar planks, but nothing approaching smoke or charcoal in it. The finish is baffling, with wood and earth at play with molasses and incense.

Collingwood makes a lot of claims that this is perhaps “the smoothest whisky ever made.” I’m not sure if that’s the case — though it is smooth and easy-drinking — but either way it’s much more than that simple platitude.

80 proof.

A- / $27 / collingwoodwhisky.com

Collingwood Canadian whisky Review: Collingwood Canadian Whisky

Review: Canadian Club Reserve Whisky 10 Years Old

The 10-year-old version of this workhorse Canadian whisky (various expressions of which we’ve reviewed several times, see links below), offers a lot to like in an unassuming, easygoing package. A rush of raw alcohol on the nose (let it breathe for a few minutes before diving in to help matters) portends little good, but once you shoo those vapors away, the experience begins to evolve.

The body is mild and easy, offering simple caramel and pleasant wood character. A bit of spice kicks up shortly after, with evergreen, honeysuckle, and eucalyptus tones leaving a distinct and lasting impression on the finish. There’s not a whole lot to Canadian Club 10 Year, unlike some of its high-end counterparts, but for this price, I’m not exactly looking for the moon. A great mixer.

B+ / $24 / canadianclubwhisky.com

canadian club 10 years old reserve Review: Canadian Club Reserve Whisky 10 Years Old

Review: Crown Royal Black Canadian Whisky

They say three of anything is a trend. Well, by my count, we’re at five.

I’m talking about whiskeys with extra oak aging, particularly with the word “Black” added to the name.

Crown Royal Black is, as you may expect, an added-oak version of the venerable Crown Royal Canadian whisky. In this case, “black” is no joke. It may very well be the darkest color whiskey I’ve ever encountered, a deep hazelnut color in the glass. The spirit in a full bottle is nearly opaque.

This concerned me. Over-oaking is a serious risk in whiskey, and the worry of a ruined whisky was on the top of my mind. The good news is that Crown Royal Black isn’t too far gone. Yes, it is oaked to within an inch of its life, but Crown has taken it just to the edge — and brought it back again.

The body is sweet like standard Crown Royal, but laced with intense oily wood notes, cinnamon, black pepper, and dried figs. Surprisingly mild for 90 proof, that wood character even overpowers the alcohol out of the spirit.

Long and smoldering finish, like a campfire turning to ash. That, of course, has good and bad connotations. I expect CR Black may be too much whisky for many. Others will find it’s got a rustic, frontier character that also finds a bit of balance in its own odd way.

B+ / $32 / crownroyal.com

crown royal black Review: Crown Royal Black Canadian Whisky

Review: Revel Stoke Spiced Whisky

You got your spiced rum… well now you got your spiced whiskey, too!.

From Phillips Distilling in Minnesota comes Revel Stoke, a Canadian Whisky with “spice and other natural flavors” added. Relaunched after years of absence from the shelves (it was originally released in 2000 and was often written as “Revelstoke”), the cult classic (as the company refers to it) is just returning to the market this month.

If I served this to you and told you it was spiced rum, my hunch is that you’d never know the difference. Sweet but a little cloying, it offers big vanilla notes, with cinnamon and a little cherry spicing it up. The spice level is actually just about perfect, really.

What’s missing, though, is any sense of whiskey here. The spice and sweetness overshadows any of those corn or grain characters that give whiskey its nuance, and aside from the vanilla notes, even any woodiness from barrel aging is tough to get in this spirit. Worth a look if you’re a spiced rum fan on the hunt for something different.

90 proof.

B+ / $TBD / revelstokewhisky.com

Revel Stoke spiced whisky Review: Revel Stoke Spiced Whisky

Review: Canadian Mist Black Diamond Whisky

Canadian Mist is known as a smooth, very simple, and, above all else, extremely cheap Canadian whisky. Now the company is trying to expand, broadening its product range and upgrading its image with more premium bottlings.

Canadian Mist Black Diamond is billed — alongside a gold-etched autograph from the distiller — as “a richer, more robust blended Canadian whisky.” Compared to standard Mist, it certainly is that, but frankly I think this is a step back.

In practice, Black Diamond gets its “robust” character from two things: The addition of what seems to be a lot more rye and corn in the mix, and an upgrade in proof level from 80 to 86 proof. Canadian Mist also says the sherry content is upgraded, but I found that altogether absent here.

Black Diamond’s 36-month age statement is the same as its predecessor, and three years just isn’t enough time in barrel for a mash like this. The taste is not especially rye-like but is rather overflowing with brutish corn notes, giving it a young, white dog character that is not altogether pleasant on its own. It’s a fine mixer and still a bargain at $15 a bottle, but I think the original Mist is, ironically, a more polished spirit.

C / $15 / canadianmist.com

Canadian Mist Black Diamond Review: Canadian Mist Black Diamond Whisky

Review: Caribou Crossing Single Barrel Canadian Whisky and Royal Canadian Small Batch Canadian Whisky

Two new whiskies from our friends at Sazerac and their compatriots north of the border. Both limited edition bottlings with unique pedigrees, these Canadian spirits are just now hitting the market.

Caribou Crossing Single Barrel Canadian Whisky is a deceivingly light orange color, belying the amount of rich flavor it has inside. Big orange and citrus character dominate the spirit, with spiciness from the whiskey’s rye underpinnings cutting through and bringing an exotic touch to the spirit’s finish. Wood character is light, with sweet vanilla notes from barrel aging giving plenty of balance to the racier notes in the blend. It isn’t a big or overwhelming whiskey, by any stretch, but unlike so many Canadian whiskeys it is really nice and smooth on its own, in need of nothing more than an empty vessel (no mixers, ice, or water) to enjoy it fully. 80 proof. A- / $50

Royal Canadian Small Batch Canadian Whisky is less complex than Caribou Crossing, but it’s still a worthwhile whiskey. Redolent of maple syrup and mint, it’s got lots of grain-fueled rye character which adds a layer of spice atop this. Imperfectly balanced, the whiskey is more rustic in tone, though at only 80 proof hardly the rotgut stuff of the saloon era. B+ / $25

sazerac.com