Recipes: Celebrate Sailor Jerry’s 106th Birthday with 3 Cocktails

You can’t have an anniversary without a special anniversary edition bottle — and this one is certainly special, with Norman Collins’ photo on the back. You may know him better by another name:

January 14th marks the 106th birthday of the undisputed father of old school tattooing, Norman “Sailor Jerry” Collins. Known for his unapologetic attitude and all-American values, Norman Collins was a tattoo legend, a musician, radio host, biker, and served in the U.S. Navy.

After his time in the Navy, Collins made Hawaii his home and opened a tattoo parlor where he showcased the innovative craftsmanship and artistry that made him famous. He was an inspiration for many modern day artists and creators such as tattoo artists Oliver Peck, Michael Malone and artist turned designer Ed Hardy. Collins’ iconic flash art work has lived on in tattoo designs and art across the world.

Sailor Jerry Spiced Rum was created to honor Norman “Sailor Jerry” Collins, and the brand celebrates all of his personal passions – from the military and the inked community, to motorcycles and rock n’ roll, and to those people and partners who live their lives according to their beliefs.

To celebrate, Sailor Jerry Spiced Rum has teamed up with The Field Museum in Chicago, to host a special birthday celebration. The Field Museum’s Tattoo Exhibit is currently home to some of Norman Collins’ original tattoo flash artwork, so to honor the legend on his birthday, Oliver Peck from Spike TV’s Ink Master’s will be providing complimentary Norman Collins flash tattoos to a select number of attendees.

In honor of Mr. Collins, here are three cocktails to celebrate the tattooed icon.

This cool, refreshing cocktail called a Cherry Jerry is delightful. When garnishing with the cherry, why not add a couple of spoons of syrup from the maraschino cherry jar? The spiced rum plays off of the lemon-lime soda for a drink fit for a backyard picnic or poolside. Save this recipe for the hot months to come. You’ll be pleased with it.

Cherry Jerry
1 part Sailor Jerry Spiced Rum
3 parts lemon-lime soda
grenadine or Cherry Heering floater
garnish with a Jerry’s Cherry (see below)

Add all ingredients into a cocktail glass, garnish and serve.

Jerry’s Cherries
Drain a 10 ounce jar of Maraschino Cherries of their liquid. Fill with Sailor Jerry Spiced Rum. Return the lid and refrigerate for at least 1 week.

The ginger and rum mingle together in the Jerry Loves Ginger cocktail to make a wonderful blend of zing and spices. Don’t substitute ginger ale; you want to do the rum justice. This might also make a nice hot toddy. Simply heat up the ginger beer with a bag of chamomile tea to brew the tea. Add to a mug with the rum and a tJerry Loves Gingerablespoon of honey.

Jerry Loves Ginger
1 part Sailor Jerry Spiced Rum
3 parts ginger beer

Add Sailor Jerry to an empty highball glass, then fill with ice. Top with ginger beer and garnish with candied ginger.

A Ginger Spiced Negroni is a spicy take on a Negroni. We found the Campari a little overpowering in this cocktail, though it did lighten up as the ice melted. Perhaps using a half part would be better. It is definitely to be enjoyed as a slow sipper. Some people like their Negroni as a before-dinner drink but we recommend this one for later in the evening.

Ginger Spiced NegroniGinger Spiced Negroni
1 part Sailor Jerry Spiced Rum
1 part Campari
1/2 part ginger liqueur
1/2 part sweet vermouth

In empty mixing glass, measure Sailor Jerry. Add Campari, ginger liqueur, and sweet vermouth. Add a few chunks of ice and stir to blend flavors and dilute. Add more ice and repeat. Strain into empty chilled old fashioned glass. Add fresh ice block and garnish with candied ginger.

Review: Captain Morgan Jack-O’Blast

captain-morgan-jack-oblast-bottle-shot-2

You know how you have those neighbors that go all out at Halloween? They put their decorations up in September. Everyone gets dressed up, even the dog. They give out the full size Snickers. You know the type.

Well, I had no idea, but Captain Morgan is that family. This new limited edition expression follows in the footsteps of Captain Morgan Cannon Blast, which was designed as a Jagermeister-like shot and bottled in a faux cannonball. Jack-o-Blast, as you can see from the photo above, is bottled in a faux pumpkin! And it looks legit! It doesn’t really matter what this stuff tastes like. You can put the bottle on your dining table as a credible centerpiece for the Halloween season.

Anyhoo, there is actual liquid inside the bottle, which is described as “pumpkin spiced rum.” At 30% alcohol, it’s lower-proof than Cannon Blast even, which is likely part of why the color is so light and golden hued. On the nose, imagine a liquified pumpkin pie, heavy with cloves, ginger, and vanilla — the hallmarks of a classic pumpkin pie. The palate isn’t quite as crystal clear. It drinks foremost with cola notes, from start to finish, the herbal elements adding a layer on top of that. Quite sweet from start to finish, it manages to keep from being overblown with sugar. In fact, while that sweetness hangs in there, it’s the cloves that linger longest on the finish, though its the aroma that makes the biggest and most lingering pumpkin-like impression.

Prototypical “pumpkin everything” fans will probably enjoy this beverage a bit more than I did… but I expect more of it will end up in coffee and on ice cream than it does in shot glasses.

60 proof.

B / $15 / captainmorgan.com

Review: Wicked Dolphin Coconut Rum and Spiced Rum

Wicked Dolphin

Never mind the cringeworthy name: Wicked Dolphin is a quality rum made not in the Caribbean but in Florida (Cape Coral, specifically), where it has been distilled from local sugar cane since 2012.

Wicked Dolphin makes a white rum (not reviewed here), but it’s best known for its spiced version. Below we’ve got a review of both it and Wicked Dolphin’s coconut-flavored rum below. Thoughts follow.

Wicked Dolphin Coconut Rum – Made with real coconut water. The rum offers a fairly standard nose for this style, sweet and authentically coconut, without harsh overtones. The body offers a mild departure from the expected — with the distinctly milky, creamy notes of coconut water vs. the harsher, biting notes of more widely used coconut extracts. This makes for a fairly gentle rum in a world where not a lot of nuance is the norm, fresh on the fiish, with lightly nutty notes lingering as it fades. 60 proof. A- / $23

Wicked Dolphin Florida Spiced Rum – Tastes like Florida? (Gators and tourists?) Actually, the white rum is flavored with honey, oranges, and various spices — plus a bit of aged rum to round things out. Unlike most spiced rums, it is bottled at full proof. The honey notes are clear and striking both on the nose and palate, with a heavy cinnamon and clove character underneath. Initially somewhat bitter with heavy orange peel notes, it opens up over time as the citrus becomes juicier and more floral, lending the rum a somewhat soothing character. The finish offers a touch of sweetness, but it’s held in check by the more savory herbal notes. Definitely worth experimenting with in cocktails. 80 proof. B / $25

wickeddolphinrum.com

Review: South Hollow Spirits Twenty Boat Cape Cod Spiced Rum

View More: http://organicphotography.pass.us/20-boat

Massachusetts-based craft producer South Hollow Spirits has a heavy focus on rum, one of the traditional spirits of New England in the pre-Prohibition era. The Twenty Boat brand comprises both an amber and a spiced rum, the latter of which we review below.

Made from organic molasses and sugar cane juice sourced from Florida and Louisiana, the rum is double-distilled and steeped for three weeks with a mixture of locally sourced spices: cardamom, vanilla bean, cinnamon, rose hip, anise, lemon peel, orange peel, allspice, nutmeg and chai,

That’s a lot of botanicals, and it makes things curious from the get-go, starting with the color. Twenty Boat Spiced Rum is an engaging shade of dark amber, with a rosy pink hue. On the nose, the rum comes across as youthful, with some raw alcohol character and a bit of astringency dulling notes of molasses, flamed orange peel, cloves, and that unique, cardamom-scented chai. Give this rum some time in glass, and those youthful notes eventually give way to the spicier elements.

On the flipside, the palate is a bit winey and Port-like, heavier with juicy orange notes than the nose would indicate, with hefty cloves, almond, licorice, and allspice notes hitting hard soon after. The finish is sweet and almost candylike, with cinnamon-heavy notes of Red Hots swirled into a somewhat saccharine, syrupy base.

All told this is a highly credible spiced rum — particularly if the higher alcohol content is to your liking — but it feels a bit busy at times. Give it plenty of air to let things marry a bit and for its initially raw characteristics to blow off — never have I encountered a spirit that improved so much from having a full glass left open to the air overnight.

95 proof.

A- / $42 / southhollowspirits.com

Review: Monkey Spiced Rum

monkey rum spicedIt must happen to all of us. Zane Lamprey got so tired of drinking spirits that he figured he should just make his own. The result of that ennui with the drinking world is Monkey Rum (named for Lamprey’s stuffed monkey that is omnipresent on his televised boozing adventures), which is available in both Spiced and Coconut expressions.

We got the Spiced. The Coconut broke during shipping to Drinkhacker HQ.

Monkey gets its rum from Angostura in Trinidad, aged two to three years. It is then blended with cinnamon, vanilla, a hint of coconut, and “buttery caramelized flavors,” which I would take to mean caramel except that Monkey says that no caramel color is added to the product.

That said, Lamprey sure doesn’t lie about that buttery tasting note — right from the start, this is oily, gooey, unctuous buttered popcorn, injected with the essence of pure vanilla. Cinnamon is almost nonexistent, as the essence of melted caramels blended with pure, softened butter really takes center stage. That toasted coconut does make itself known on the finish, but otherwise stays hidden in the background.

Fans of deeply cinnamon- and clove-flavored spiced rums will find Monkey to be quite far afield. In fact, it’s a lot closer to a standard gold or aged rum than it is to Captain Morgan. Is that a good thing or a bad thing? Well, that depends on your perspective. If you elect to drink spiced rum because of the spice, Monkey is a letdown. If you elect to drink it because of the rum, you might just be enchanted by this oddball novelty.

70 proof. No monkeys added.

B+ / $22 / monkeyrum.com

Review: Captain Morgan Cannon Blast

captain morgan cannon blastCaptain Morgan already has a vast command of bars around the world. Now the company is getting into the shot game with the launch of Captain Morgan Cannon Blast, “an intensely delicious shot” that comes in the cleverest packaging I’ve seen in years.

What’s Cannon Blast? “Caribbean rum with spice and natural flavors.” Isn’t that the same thing as Captain Morgan anyway? Turns out, no.

Cannon Blast’s nose is quite sweet, offering distinct notes of orange candies, a touch of cinnamon, and a bit of cherry — nothing particularly rum-like at all, actually. The body is extremely sweet — far beyond anything in a straight rum — with more of than orange candy note pervading the experience. Some mixed fruit elements come into play before the finish kicks in — pure cinnamon, and lots of it, adding a Fireball-like bite that comes on strong and lingers for at least a minute. This washes away most of the fruitier elements and leaves the drinker with quite a smoldering burn to contend with — for better or for worse. It’s not bad, but you’re definitively in “shot” territory — as intended — with all the ham-fistedness that comes with it.

As for the aforementioned packaging, Cannon Blast comes in a simulacrum of a cannonball and is etched with paint that fluoresces under black light. Shine one on the Captain and he turns into a creepy skeleton. That may not be a big deal at home, but up in da club it’s bound to help sell more than a few test tubes full of the stuff, at least in the hands of the right wench.

70 proof.

B / $16 / us.captainmorgan.com

Review: Squeal Go Pig Spiced Black Rum

squeal go pig rum

If nothing else: Points for a creative name.

Squeal Go Pig is a Colorado-produced spiced rum (it is produced by a private label distiller on behalf of the SGP folks), but apparently the “Go Pig” is optional. Just call it Squeal and you’ll be fine. It’s spiced, very dark rum — they call it black rum — though it’s unlikely this rum has significant age on it. No doubt, there is significant caramel color here.

The nose is surprisingly fresh — more brown sugar than deep molasses — with a slightly raisiny note that lends it a bit of a Port aroma (not a bad thing). On the palate it’s sweet but not overwhelming. Fruit jam hits the palate first — plums and cooked peaches — plus more raisin and prune character. The spice component is relatively underplayed, with the predominant notes of cloves and anise giving the rum a bit of the essence of sweet licorice candy.

It adds up to a dangerous combination — and one which doesn’t drink like an overproof spirit but rather a more easygoing one. Whoa, 90 proof? Better watch yourself or you really will “go pig or go home.” Oink!

90 proof.

A- / $29 / squealrum.com

-->