Review: Bacardi Gran Reserva Maestro de Ron

bacardi maestro

“Gran Reserva.” “Maestro de Ron.” These are terms that one would expect to see applied to a dark, old, well-aged rum, but Bacardi is taking the unusual step of slapping them on its latest release, a white rum.

Bacardi Gran Reserva Maestro de Ron is “designed to elevate the simple cocktail experience” and is intended as “the ultimate white mixing rum.” As with most white rums, it is aged in white oak, then filtered to white — though Maestro de Ron is said to be “double aged” — each barrel is aged for at least one year, then the barrels are married and aged again for a further three months.

That aside, the results are fine and the rum is capable, if less inspired than the name might imply.

The nose of this spirit — not quite white but rather the palest shade of gold — strikes familiar white rum chords. Hefty vanilla notes with a modest touch of fuel-like character give it that unmistakable Bacardi aroma. On the palate, the vanilla is backed up with more traditional white rum notes, including ripe banana, pencil shavings, coconut husk, and a touch of cinnamon — for the most part they are all flavors that would play nicely in tropical cocktails.

On its own, Bacardi Maestro isn’t altogether that exciting. It’s got too much of a bitter edge, particularly on the finish, which tends to highlight the petrol character a bit too clearly. There’s nothing wrong with a little funk in a white rum, particularly at this completely reasonable price level, but you’ll probably want to use it as intended — in cocktails, rather than by itself.

80 proof.

B / $25 / bacardi.com

Review: Bacardi Ron 8 Anos

Bacardi Ocho Bottle

Bacardi’s 8 year old reserve rum is one of the few rums in the regular Bacardi lineup that carries an age statement. “Bacardi Ocho,” as it’s nicknamed, is Bahaman rum that is often called out as Bacardi’s best offering.

That may indeed be the case, and it’s a large step away from Bacardi’s otherwise staid, traditional structure. Bacardi 8 begins with a molasses/sugar syrup-driven nose that is punched up with notes of cloves, cinnamon, and some citrus notes. On the palate, there’s a bit more vanilla, ample clove/allspice character, and a slight vegetal edge on the back end. This doesn’t really detract from an otherwise lovely experience that keeps your footing firmly in the bakery, but rather adds some character and nuance to a substantially well-made rum.

80 proof.

B+ / $30 / bacardi.com

Review: Don Q 151 Rum

DON_Q_151_750MLWhether you truly need to set a cocktail on fire or just want a little ultra-high-octane in your glass, 151 proof rum is a mixing ingredient without a peer. (Mention Everclear and I’ll barf on you.)

Make no mistake: 151 is dangerous. Don Q knows it and with this new bottling it even includes a flame arrester on the top of the bottle so adventurous mixologists don’t accidentally blow themselves up.

Don Q 151 is Puerto Rican rum aged for up to three years in oak barrels and bottled blazingly hot. Surprisingly, it’s still got a solid rum character — and plenty of it.

On the nose, vanilla, creme brulee, and gentle oak notes dominate. It isn’t at all the firebrand that many overproof spirits are. If you didn’t know any better, you might assume it was a standard-proof product.

The palate is another matter. It scorches to start, but there’s a surprising amount of flavor trapped in between all those ethanol molecules. Even at bottle strength, you’ll find complex notes of banana, dark caramel, coffee, and baking spices. Essentially, it’s got all the character you want in a regular-strength, aged rum — but with double the alcohol.

Now I’m not suggesting you guzzle Don Q 151 for your evening constitutional, but for floats, flames, and other fancy cocktailing effects, this is a tough 151 to beat.

151 proof. Aka DonQ.

A / $22 / donq.com

Review: Captain Morgan Grapefruit, Pineapple, and Coconut Rum

captain morgan flavors

Is the world crying out for more flavored rum? Captain Morgan thinks so, and as such it’s released a trio of new tiki-friendly rums, each naturally flavored and beyond-intensely sugared.

All three are bottled at 70 proof. Thoughts on each follow.

Captain Morgan Grapefruit Rum – Strong grapefruit notes on the nose, with a slight medicinal character underneath. The body is very sweet, with strong caramel overtones. This tends to wash out the natural tartness of the grapefruit and imbues it with heavy candylike notes. As the sweetness fades on the lengthy finish, there’s a vegetal echo, offering some incongruous notes of rosemary and sage. C-

Captain Morgan Pineapple Rum – Pineapple candy (or at least canned pineapple) gets the nose going, but the body is (unsurprisingly) all sugar. Imagine steeping pineapple slices in molten sugar, then bottling it with a touch of water and you’re not far from what Captain Morgan has come up with here. It’s lacking that veggie funk that the Grapefruit expression has, but it’s still far from anything identifiable as rum. C

Captain Morgan Coconut Rum – After all of that, I was scared to death to crack into this one for fear of being immediately put into a diabetic coma. I shouldn’t have fretted so much. While Captain Morgan Coconut is as sweet and saccharine as you’d expect, it’s restrained in comparison to the two fruit-flavored spirits that come before. This doesn’t straw too far from the Malibu formula, though it’s less tropical than that old coconut standby. The finish is surprisingly clean for a coconut vodka, and the caramel notes present in all of these rums actually complements the coconut flavor in a way that it fails to do in the other rums. Definitely the best of the lot. B

each $16 / captainmorgan.com

Review: Six Saints Rum

six saintsThis “righteous spirit of the West Indies” hails from Grenada, but little other information is provided about this rum. Only the notice of “natural colour” informs much of anything about its production.

The nose on this moderately golden rum offers a bit of petrol, backed with some cloves and a bit of spiced or mulled wine character. The body is youthful, slightly corny, with more notes of petrol and some intense clove character. Hints of butterscotch and baking cocoa eventually come along, with some sooty notes lingering on the back end.

Six Saints is a unique rum — almost whiskeylike at times (which is fitting, as the brand is owned by a Scottish company) — but ultimately it’s a bit brash and too youthful, particularly at this (import-only) price.

83.4 proof. Not readily available in the U.S.

B- / $55 / sixsaintsrum.com  [BUY IT NOW FROM MASTER OF MALT]

Review: Old Monk Very Old Vatted XXX Rum 7 Years Old

Old_Monk_XXX_rumOld Monk, a rum that’s made in Uttar Pradesh, India, is a major international seller which has a bit of a cult following on our shores. That’s probably owing more to the low price point, unique decanter, and novelty design than anything else. But let’s see how it tastes.

This expression (there are a handful of varieties) is a vatted (or blended) rum that is aged for a minimum of seven years. It appears to be traditionally produced, using molasses and used whiskey barrels for aging (though I have no official evidence of this).

The copper-hued spirit kicks off with plenty of hogo, a funky, almost winey nose with notes of dried spices, dense molasses, and some charcoal. Powerful and pungent, it leads the way into a body that is dense with baking spices — cloves, particularly — along with quite bitter (very dark) chocolate, coffee grounds, burnt nuts, and notes of old wood. The sweet molasses core is unmistakable, and when combined with the spicier elements it makes Old Monk a very good mixer. But on its own, Old Monk sips a bit too far on the tannic side. Save it for parties and punches.

B / $16 / no website

Review: Afrohead Original Rum

Afrohead Original - Front

You wouldn’t put out a rum called Afrohead and not put a line art drawing of a woman with a huge, stylized afro on the bottle, would you? Of course not. After years of hand bottling rum in an unnamed bottle featuring only the Afrohead logo, Joe Farrell and Toby Tyler are bringing this Bahamanian rum to the U.S. market officially.

Two expressions are being released, the “Original” reviewed here, which is 7 years old, plus an XO expression, bottled in an opaque decanter, which is 15 years old. Both expressions are crafted from only sugarcane molasses sourced from various farms in the West Indies, using a proprietary Trinidad yeast, and made with neither added coloring nor raw sugar added to the distillate. The rum is aged in used bourbon barrels in the Bahamas and is bottled in Barbados.

Afrohead Original is a well-crafted rum with a somewhat rustic style. The nose is heavily molasses-focused, with ample but not overblown sweetness. Hints of sweet sherry add some nuance, along with notes of marzipan. On the palate, the rum offers a bit of chalkiness on the body, with a rush of sugar right up front. As it fades, the rum gets a bit tougher and shows off more of its skin. As the finish builds, watch for burnt caramel and sooty notes, Cracker Jack, brown butter, and scorched peanuts. These more brooding flavors add layers of complexity, but they also dial back the sweetness a bit. There’s also a bit of a winey aftertaste that lingers on the back of the palate for quite a while.

All told, this is a fine rum with an interesting and compelling character that’s worth sampling.

Available in the Bahamas, Tennessee, and South Florida for now.

80 proof.

B+ / $35 / afroheadrums.com