Review: Plantation Rum Lineup (2015) – 3 Stars White, Original Dark, Barbados 5 Years Old, Extra Old 20th Anniversary, Old Reserve 2001, and Pineapple

Plantation 20 Anniv XO NEW - LOPlantation Rum is actually part of the French company Cognac Ferrand, and it produces over a dozen rums that are sourced from plantations all over the Caribbean and beyond. Some of these rums we’ve reviewed before, but today we’re taking a deep dive into six of the company’s offerings, including its first foray into a flavored product.

Let’s dive in!

Plantation 3 Stars White Rum (2015) – Made from a blend of various rums, filtered to clear. A clean white rum, it’s free of most of the petrol overtones that are endemic with so many whites. Here notes of banana and some coconut give this rum a lot of fruit and ample depth — which makes sense because some of the rum that makes up this expression is up to 12 years old. Very easygoing and highly mixable. 82.4 proof. A- / $17 (1 liter)

Plantation Original Dark Rum (2015) – Aged Trinidad stock. Funky on the nose — overly so — with bizarre hogo notes of green olives and feta cheese. A nutty, coffee-focused character emerges as the rum opens up on the palate, but it’s constrained by those herbal, bitter, funky flavors that really start to interfere with the big picture over time. 80 proof. B- / $17

Plantation Grande Reserve Rum Barbados 5 Years Old – Self-explanatory provenance here, in a rum that is light in color but long on character. A restrained nose offers hints of brown sugar, banana, and fresh apple, but keeps it in check. On the palate, huge coconut notes emerge, plus more banana and some pineapple notes. Fruit from start to finish: If you want the perfect rum for a pina colada, this is your guy. A huge bargain. 80 proof. A- / $16

Plantation Rum Extra Old 20th Anniversary (2015) – The “XO” bottling of Plantation comprises old stock finished in ex-Cognac barrels. A brooding sophisticate next to the fruitier style of many of Plantation’s offerings, the XO features dense leather, tobacco, dark chocolate, and coffee notes before giving way to darker fruit notes — prune, plum, and blackberry. Some tropical emerge with time, but they struggle to get through the brooding, almost fireside character. That’s not a bad thing. This is complex, old, and quite enchanting rum at its finest. 80 proof. A / $43

Plantation Rum Old Reserve 2001 Jamaica – An update on the 2000 line, this single-vintage rum is pushy and funky, a cousin of the Original Dark above, writ small. It’s intense and funky, but light on its feet, folding fruit into a base that offers a heavily vegetal and pungent character. Slightly smoky, with hospital notes, it’s certainly not a rum for beginners, though one can see how it might find a home in a less fruit-forward cocktail like a Zombie or even a powerful update to a Hemingway Daiquiri. 84 proof. B / $40

Plantation Artisinal Infusion Original Dark Pineapple Rum – A pineapple-infused version of the Original Dark above. You’ll smell it right away from the second the bottle is cracked open — big, sugary pineapple notes that absolutely take over the whole affair. There’s an argument that perhaps the nose should do that — but for my money I’d rather take the more nuanced Barbados 5 Year Old (at half the price, mind you) and use that as the base for any fruity cocktails I was making. All in all, here we see juicy pineapple meet a dusting of brown sugar — and that’s really the end of the story. 80 proof. B / $43

Review: Cruzan Blueberry Lemonade Rum

I’m not gonna lie. It’s over 90 degrees outside as I write this, and nothing sounds better than a glass of cold blueberry lemonade. Cruzan’s latest flavor unfortunately won’t get you there — even with a ton of ice, it’s too sweet and saccharine to recreate a boozy lemonade on its own.

At a mere 42 proof, this concoction isn’t much stronger than a bottle of wine. The nose is indistinct with citrus notes, the body pushy with liquid sugar more than anything else. Both of the label-promised elements come to play in due time: First the blueberry, which has a candied/syrupy character like you might find in a box of breakfast cereal. Then the lemony notes on the finish. Lemonade? More like Lemonheads candy.

As a mixer (with real lemonade) this might be fun… but once you get to that level, well, what’s the point?

C / $12 /

Review: Captain Morgan Grapefruit, Pineapple, and Coconut Rum

captain morgan flavors

Is the world crying out for more flavored rum? Captain Morgan thinks so, and as such it’s released a trio of new tiki-friendly rums, each naturally flavored and beyond-intensely sugared.

All three are bottled at 70 proof. Thoughts on each follow.

Captain Morgan Grapefruit Rum – Strong grapefruit notes on the nose, with a slight medicinal character underneath. The body is very sweet, with strong caramel overtones. This tends to wash out the natural tartness of the grapefruit and imbues it with heavy candylike notes. As the sweetness fades on the lengthy finish, there’s a vegetal echo, offering some incongruous notes of rosemary and sage. C-

Captain Morgan Pineapple Rum – Pineapple candy (or at least canned pineapple) gets the nose going, but the body is (unsurprisingly) all sugar. Imagine steeping pineapple slices in molten sugar, then bottling it with a touch of water and you’re not far from what Captain Morgan has come up with here. It’s lacking that veggie funk that the Grapefruit expression has, but it’s still far from anything identifiable as rum. C

Captain Morgan Coconut Rum – After all of that, I was scared to death to crack into this one for fear of being immediately put into a diabetic coma. I shouldn’t have fretted so much. While Captain Morgan Coconut is as sweet and saccharine as you’d expect, it’s restrained in comparison to the two fruit-flavored spirits that come before. This doesn’t straw too far from the Malibu formula, though it’s less tropical than that old coconut standby. The finish is surprisingly clean for a coconut vodka, and the caramel notes present in all of these rums actually complements the coconut flavor in a way that it fails to do in the other rums. Definitely the best of the lot. B

each $16 /

Review: Bully Boy Distillers Hub Punch

Bully Boy Hub Punch Bottle

Bully Boy is a Boston-based craft distiller that makes vodka, rum, and white whiskey… and which also makes this oddity: The Hub Punch. What’s Hub Punch? Bully Boy explains:

Inspired by the original Hub Punch recipe popular in the late 1800’s, Bully Boy Hub Punch, our barrel aged rum infused with fruits and botanicals, revives a historic Boston tradition that was a casualty of Prohibition. Originally concocted at the now defunct Hub Hotel, Bostonians typically enjoyed Hub Punch mixed with soda water, ginger ale, or lemonade. Bully Boy consulted a variety of historical accounts of Hub Punch to craft a spirit that pays homage to the traditional recipe and spirit of the pre-prohibition era Boston. Bully Boy Hub Punch is fruit forward with the botanicals providing tea-like undertones ideal for mixing with both dry and sweet mixing agents.

So, it’s essentially a high-proof cocktail in a bottle, rum flavored with citrus, fruit, and botanicals. Think of it as a rum-based sangria and you’re pretty close.

The Hub Punch is a deep garnet spirit, and taken neat it’s pretty overwhelming. Intense fruit overtones push it into the realm of cough syrup, extremely cloying and medicinal, with intense licorice overtones. Ice alone helps temper the spirit, as does some plain water (other mixer ideas are outlined above). Cooling things down helps to bring out The Hub Punch’s more interesting nuances, including chocolate notes, cinnamon, raisin, and plenty of that licorice note. There’s still a whole lot of sweetness here, with the fruit and root beer notes ultimately growing on you the way a bottomless pitcher of sangria does.


70 proof.

B / $30 /

Review: Sugar Skull Rum

sugar skull rum

Here’s a new batch of rums, comprising five flavored expressions. Sugar Skull is made from can sourced throughout the Caribbean and South America and distilled in the Caribbean (the company doesn’t say where) in a column still. The final product is blended and flavored in the U.S. before bottling in dia de los muertes inspired decanters.

Five expressions are being produced, all of which are flavored to some degree (even the silver rum, see below). We checked out three of them for review. Thoughts follow.

Sugar Skull Rum Tribal Silver – Flavored with “a slight essence of cocoa and vanilla.” The flavoring agents mainly serve to soften this rum a bit, giving it a clearer vanilla spin, particularly on the palate. Hints of coconut (more so than chocolate) emerge on the back end. The nose is less distinct and hotter than the above might indicate, with more traditional rum funk throughout. The body seems tailor-made for mixing, however, and would excel with a simple cola or in a tropical concoction. 80 proof. 

Sugar Skull Rum Mystic Vanilla – This rum features “natural vanilla overtones” … but “overtones” is a bit light for the vanilla bomb in store for drinkers of this ultra-punchy spirit. Very sugary on the nose, with marshmallow overtones. These carry through to the palate, which doesn’t so much come across as vanilla as it does liquified rock candy. It ventures way too far into candyland for my palate… but hey, at least it has “sugar” in the name. 80 proof.

Sugar Skull Rum Native Coconut Blend – At first I thought the back label — “infused with a slight aroma of wild blueberries” — was a typo, but this seems to be on point: This coconut rum also has a touch of blueberry in it, too, making for a weirdly unexpected fruit kick atop a base of traditionally sweetened coconut “party rum”. The berries hit the nose more than the palate, which is heavily sugared and clearly designed to be used as something like half of your pina colada. The berry notes make a return appearance on the finish, which they impact in a strangely unctuous and lingering way. 42 proof. 

each $28 /

Review: Blue Chair Bay Coconut Spiced Rum Cream

blue chair bay coconut cream

Somehow we never managed to review Blue Chair Bay Rum — a product rolled out by country star Kenny Chesney — when it launched last year, but today we did land a sample of a new limited edition line extension: Blue Chair Bay Coconut Spiced Rum Cream.

Now that sounds like a lot of pressure to put on a poor, defenseless rum, and this milky, eggnoggy-looking product doesn’t exactly shriek with high hopes when poured into a glass. For heaven’s sake at least dust it with some nutmeg so people don’t think you’re drinking milk, mmkay?

The nose is gooey and unctuous, somewhat off-putting in the way that only eggnog can be — a lot like the milk left in the bottom of a bowl of sugary cereal. Distinct banana notes are prevalent, with touches of cinnamon. The body has more where that came from. The powerful cotton candy sugar notes hit you first, then banana. Coconut is more of a hint on the finish, as is a vague indication of cinnamon. Until then, I would have assumed this was a banana cream rum if I didn’t already know any better. Either way, it’s the overwhelming sweetness that sticks with you, seemingly for hours, over any of the fruit or spice elements. Be ready for some serious toothbrushing lest the cavity creeps give you the once over later on.

That said, this is probably good enough to use for a quickie, down-and-dirty Pina Colada if you’re out of the other raw ingredients. I wouldn’t make a habit of it, though.

30 proof.

B- / $22 /

Review: Selvarey Rum and Selvarey Cacao

Selvarey White (570x1024)

Yes, that’s a gorilla silhouette on the bottle. Yes, these spirits are made in Panama. Yes, the closest wild gorillas live about 6,300 miles away from Panama, across the Atlantic Ocean in Africa. Yes, Bruno Mars is a co-founder of the company. Yes, that’s as random as that gorilla on the bottle.

Selvarey’s recent launch brought forward two products, a white rum and a “cacao rum,” a chocolate-flavored spirit, both made at legendary rum-maestro Don Pancho’s distillery in Pese. We nabbed them both and bring our thoughts on them to you here.

Selvarey Rum – A blend of two column-distilled rums, one three years old, one five years old, both aged in former bourbon barrels. The two are mixed together and filtered back to a nearly white spirit. Selvarey has a significant level of refinement for a white rum. Aromas of light brown sugar, glazed doughnuts, and vanilla hit the nose. On the palate, it’s on the sweet side, veering toward marshmallow, with a touch of a smoky edge to it. This is a good thing, adding nuance to a spirit category that can often veer into one of two directions — bruising petrol-fueled bomb or overly sweetened diabetes in a glass. Selvarey threads the needle as neither, pulling off a sweetish rum that is born to mix with, but which can also do a decent job in the world of sippers. Way to go, Mr. Mars. If that is your real name. 80 proof. A- / $25

Selvarey Cacao – Misleading product name: Selvarey Cacao is actually dark rum infused with natural chocolate flavor, not a cocoa bean liqueur. Selvarey Cacao is a five-year old aged rum blended with local cocoa. The nose is rich with chocolate notes; the rum component is there, but indistinct. The body is a bittersweet chocolate powerhouse, but up front you’ll catch notes of vanilla, butterscotch, and a bit of coffee bean. Overall, the chocolate element is so powerful that this could easily work as a chocolate liqueur alternative, but the rum component keeps it grounded in the spirit world. Try it as a cordial, then a mixer. 70 proof. A- / $30

Review: Newfoundland Screech Rum, Spiced Rum, and Honey Rum

screech spiced rumWho woulda thought they’d name a rum after this guy?

In all seriousness… Back in the old days (like, yesteryear), Newfoundland-based sailors drank a lot of rum. They got their rotgut from Jamaica, and it didn’t even have a name. As the story goes, decades later an American WWII G.I. drank a slug of the unwatered-down rum while visiting and upon swallowing he gave off a howl of pain. The noise was described as “The Screech,” and the rum finally had its name.

Today, Screech Rum is still a partly Canadian product, sourced in the Caribbean as always and bottled in Newfoundland. A straight expression is available, along with a spiced rum and one flavored version. Thoughts on all three follow.

Newfoundland Screech Rum – Aged Jamaican rum, no age statement, with caramel color added (it’s quite dark in coloration). The nose is quite funky, with notes of well-burnt/almost-blackened sugar, charcoal, and beef jerky. On the tongue, things sweeten up, but it’s still easy to see how Screech got its name. Though this expression is far from barrel proof, it’s got a healthy amount of hogo to it, its overpowering burnt sugar notes somewhat balanced by some, well, non-burnt sugar. Not much fruit here, just secondary character of ash and smoldering lumber, and a dusky finish that lasts for ages. Definitely for fans of more rustic (yet aged) rum styles. 80 proof. B- / $17

Newfoundland Screech Spiced Rum – This is wholly different stock, made from Demerara rum from Guyana, aged 4 to 8 years. Spiced, with no sugar added. This is a compelling spiced rum. Again that burnt sugar character is strongest, with light vanilla and cinnamon notes coming up behind — almost French toast-like at times. Unlike the straight version, here at least those secondary elements stand a fighting chance. The smoldering finish of the straight rum fades as the spiced element grabs hold, giving this rum a considerably better balance on the whole — though it. 70 proof. B+ / $18

Newfoundland Screech Honey Rum – Why should whiskey have all the fun? Here’s a new idea: rum flavored with honey. This starts with the same aged Jamaican rum as above, then receives “natural honey flavor.” Coulda fooled me. The overall impact is more of a lemon-flavored rum, or some kind of lemon-honey amalgam. Either way, the rum is largely lost and the finished product comes off like some kind of liquified throat lozenge. 70 proof. C- / $18

Review: Rougaroux Rum Complete Lineup


Thibodaux, Louisiana is home to Donner-Peltier Distillers, which is in turn home to the Rougaroux collection, as well as a number of other spirits (all of which we’ll be reviewing in due course). Up first is this trio of rums, which offer a distinctly Cajun perspective on this venerable spirit. Plastic beads not included. Read on for more.

Rougaroux Sugarshine Rum – A “rum moonshine,” this overproof, white spirit is made from local sugar cane. The nose is funky and fuel-like, more white whiskey than any white rum you’re likely to be familiar with. Things settle down on the tongue, fortunately, revealing some simple sugar notes. At this proof level, though, that sweetness is laced with an overpowering level of raw alcohol, providing a flood of hospital notes that the “sugarshine” can barely hold a candle to. 101 proof. B- / $21

Rougaroux Full Moon Dark Rum – Blackstrap molasses and raw sugar cane are used to make a white rum, which is aged in white oak barrels for an unstated amount of time. No caramel color or other agent is added. The results are curious. Rougaroux’s petrol character doesn’t slip away here. It’s big on the nose, pushing all but the faintest hint of molasses out of the picture. The body has plenty more of those fuel notes to go around, though they’re rounded out by some brown sugar character, vanilla, and sugary breakfast cereal notes. Tough on the back end — my hunch is that this has seen some time in new oak barrels (not used whiskey barrels), which would explain the very dark color, and that raw lumber has simply had its way with this spirit. 80 proof. B / $21

Rougaroux 13 Pennies Praline Rum – I love pralines. (I’m Texan, so it’s long A.) It would be un-American not to enjoy a good pecan-and-sugar confection from time to time. What then to make of 13 Pennies “Praline” rum? The NOLA staple isn’t at all detectable here. Though it is made with local pecans and Louisiana’s famous cane syrup, the nose is more akin to almonds or Amaretto. Presumably that’s due to the rum base interfering with the flavoring  ingredients. The attack is a bit vague and, again, grainy, with a nuttiness — again, more almond than pecan — coming to bear as the finish starts to build. Said finish is only moderate in its sweetness, that nutty character building to head before fading into a vague astringency. 80 proof. B- / $21

Review: Cruzan Peach Rum

cruzan peachFruit-flavored rum day continues with this latest release from Cruzan, which clocks in at a mere 42 proof (about the same as a fortified wine).

The St. Croix-based rum operation infuses natural peach flavor into white rum (and lots of water, it seems) to create this light-as-a-feather, gently flavored spirit. Unlike the fruit bomb of Bacardi Mango Fusion, reviewed earlier today, Cruzan Peach is built with restraint in mind.

The nose is more of an apricot-cherry mix than peach, but either way it’s mild and indistinct. The body has clearer peach notes, more canned than fresh, but completely harmless through and through. The body is so light and airy it almost feels like you’re drinking a wine cooler that’s gone flat. The finish is minimal — lightly sweet and unfocused — fading away before you can figure out what you just drank.

B / $15 /