Category Archives: Rated B+

Tasting the Wines of Chateau du Moulin-a-Vent

An icon of the Beaujolais, Moulin-a-Vent’s estate began producing wines as early as the 1700s. Today the estate has 30 hectares of land under vine, separated into 91 different plots — many of which are used to make single-plot releases showcasing a specific terroir. Ownership changed with the 2009 vintage — and some of these wines are just now hitting the market.

Beaujolais is of course the home of Gamay (red wines) and Chardonnay (whites, which are comparatively rare). Moulin-a-Vent only grows Gamay. Its Pouilly-Fuisse is made with non-estate fruit.

We recently looked at eight different wines from this famed chateau, in three different categories:

First are the CMV wines, which feature a much different art deco-style label and are made from non-estate fruit.

CMV Couvent Des Thorins Brand 300x273 Tasting the Wines of Chateau du Moulin a Vent2012 CMV Moulin-a-Vent Pouilly-Fuisse Vielle Vignes - A rather vegetal white wine, it shows lemony notes at first before delving into a rather intense green vegetable note that builds on the finish. This eases up a bit with some warmth, but the slightly bitter character is sustained for quite awhile. B / $15

2012 CMV Moulin-a-Vent Couvent des Thorins – Classically Old World on the nose, with lots of vinegary acid, rhubarb, and licorice root notes. The body is equally heavy on the acid, brash and mouth-searing with its simplistic cherry-like construction and fiery finish. C- / $15

Up next, these are blends from all many of Chateau du Moulin-a-Vent’s plots. They comprise the most common expressions from the chateau. Here’s a look at a vertical of three recent vintages of the wine.

2011 Chateau du Moulin-a-Vent – Engaging nose, with gentle fruit, some smoke, some mint. The body is ripe without being overly fruity or lush, a gentler expression of gamay with a core of simple plums, touches of vanilla, and notes of pumpkin spice on the back end. Easy to enjoy. B+ / $20

2010 Chateau du Moulin-a-Vent – More earth here, particularly on the dusty, mushroomy nose. The body offers balance between the savory earth elements and fruit, presenting a significantly different profile than the fruitier 2011. Fans of bigger, more wintry, and more food-appropriate wines will probably prefer this style. B+ / $20

2009 Chateau du Moulin-a-Vent – Well past its prime. Again, showing lots of oxidation and acidity like the Thorins reviewed above, with a somewhat skunky, burnt nose and a body that attacks the tongue with vinegar notes. This was an exemplary vintage in Beaujolais, so it appears time has really had its way with this wine. C- / $20

Finally come the terroir-driven, plot-specific releases from Chateau du Moulin-a-Vent. Each is released with its specific plot noted on the label.

2009 Chateau du Moulin-a-Vent Clos de Londres - It fares better than the standard 2009 bottling above, but not by much. Again, it’s well past its prime, showing strong vinegar chateau du moulin a vent 11 Croix des Verillats Bottle 83x300 Tasting the Wines of Chateau du Moulin a Ventnotes, but offering pleasant enough cranberry, raspberry, and blackberry character after the intense acid starts to fade. C+ / $NA

2011 Chateau du Moulin-a-Vent Champ de Cour – Ample earth and licorice notes, backed by restrained, austere fruit — raspberries and blackberries. The finish features tobacco notes, blackberry jam, and a return to some of that woody, earthy funk. An interesting wine with shades of the 2010 standard bottling. B+ / $34

2011 Chateau du Moulin-a-Vent Croix des Verillats – Notes of ripe cheese on the nose start things off in a weird way, but the highly fruity, almost jelly-like body, pairs with it in an unexpected way. This is an austere wine that drinks like an older expression of Moulin-a-Vent, but offers a worthwhile complexity and depth to it. B+ / $32

chateaudumoulinavent.com

Review: 2012 Pinot Noirs from Domaine Carneros

DC LA TERRE PROMISE PN NV 96x300 Review: 2012 Pinot Noirs from Domaine CarnerosThree new Pinots from Domaine Carneros, all part of the 2012 vintage, including two single-clone varietals, a rare feat in the Pinotverse.

2012 Domaine Carneros Pinot Noir Clonal Series Swan – Each year Domaine Carneros spotlights one of the 12 different Pinot Noir clones grown here by bottling it separately. The 2012 vintage is the first year to feature the Swan clone. It’s textbook Pinot at first, but eventually reveals itself to be a bit on the sweet side, with notes that veer more toward chocolate sauce and raisin notes up front, with a tart, mouth-puckering finish that hints at tobacco leaf. As a big Pinot fan I could drink this any day, but the lushness of the body becomes a bit overwhelming by the end of the second glass. B+ / $55

2012 Domaine Carneros Pinot Noir Clonal Series Dijon 115 - Another wine from the Clonal Series, Dijon 115 is a better-known clone and it’s easy to see why it’s so popular, offering a dense cherry core that’s studded with notes of cola, tea leaf, and chocolate. The finish heads floral, recalling violets and a touch of spice. Pretty but also lush, this wine could easily be released as is, no blend required. A / $55

2012 Domaine Carneros Pinot Noir La Terre Promise – This is a single-vineyard estate wine from Domaine Carneros, created from a blend of Pinot clones. Here the whole is less than the sum of the parts. The wine is deep and rich, with chocolate notes, but it’s lacking the lively fruit that great Pinot has, replacing it with Port-like currant notes. There’s a touch of vegetal-driven bitterness here, too, particularly on the finish. My wife said she never would have guessed this was Pinot if she’d tasted it blind, and it’s easy to see why. The density and sweetness of the wine make it come across closer to a Zin-Cab hybrid, not the elegant type of wine I typically associate with Domaine Carneros. B+ / $55

domainecarneros.com

Review: Re:Find Vodka, Cucumber Vodka, Gin, & Limoncello

refind Gin Vodka 525x1008 Review: Re:Find Vodka, Cucumber Vodka, Gin, & Limoncello

Distilled from grapes in Paso Robles, California, Re:Find is a boutique distillery that turns its “neutral brandies” into a variety of straight and flavored spirits. Distilled “from grapes” has certain connotations, but Re:Find is careful to note its vodka is not grappa, a specific type of brandy that is distilled from a by-product of winemaking. Re:Find is rather made from “free run” juice called saignee that is bled off during pressing, before red wine grapes are fermented — so it’s closer to an unaged brandy in composition. These are high-end grapes, which just so happen to be used to make wine at Villicana Winery — which is under the same ownership.

Mostly available only in California, we got a look at four of the spirits in Re:Find’s lineup. All four spirits reviewed below are 80 proof.

Re:Find Vodka – A bit grappa-like on the nose, with some of that funky, twig-‘n’-stem character you see on this spirit, but it’s undercut with the lightest aromas of honey and marshmallow. The body offers more in the way of hazelnuts, banana, and vanilla cookies, which makes for an interesting counterpart to the funkier nose (again, much like a good grappa). There’s a lot going on in this spirit and while it’s initially a bit much when sipping straight, it does show lots of nuance and character, and it merits exploration both on the rocks and in more complex cocktails. A- / $35

Re:Find Cucumber Vodka – Interesting choice for your first flavor, but damn if a nose full of Re:find Cucumber doesn’t smell like you’re headed to a day at the spa. Crisp and authentic, this vodka offers pure and refreshing cucumber flavor through and through, with just the lightest dusting of sweetness on the finish to offer some balance against the vegetal notes up front. You get none of the earthy grappa character in the unflavored vodka here, just fresh cukes from start to finish. Impressive considering this is legitimately flavored with fresh cucumbers. Seasonally available. A / $25 (375ml)

Re:Find Gin – Triple distilled and infused with (mostly local) juniper berry, coriander, orris root, lemon & orange peel, grains of paradise, and lavender. This is an engaging gin, juniper-forward on the nose, with hints of lavender underpinning it. On the palate, things get a bit switched up. Here the lavender picks up the ball and runs, with the citrus notes coming on strong. It’s quite a trick, as the nose sets you up for a big evergreen bomb, then the body lets you down easy with a more sedate character suitable for the tropics. Re:Find Gin could benefit from a bit more complexity — maybe grapefruit peel or black pepper, or both — but as it stands it’s an engaging and quite drinkable little spirit. A- / $43

Re:Find Limoncello – Pale in color in comparison to many commercial limoncellos and translucent, Re:Find’s Limoncello looks and smells more like pure, fresh lemon juice — much more so than the stuff you typically see from Italy. Heavy on sour juice and bitter zest, this is intense stuff. If you’re looking for a sweet and lightly sour limoncello that will pair well with your berries-and-whipped-cream dessert, this isn’t the liqueur for you. If intense, almost raw, lemon character is your bag, give it a go… though you’ll have to visit Re:Find’s distillery to get some. B+ / $NA (375ml)

refinddistillery.com

Review: Bittermilk Mixer No. 4

bittermilk 4 199x300 Review: Bittermilk Mixer No. 4It was only a few months ago when the first three of Bittermilk‘s ready-to-go, artisan mixers hit our desk. Now a fourth is already ready: New Orleans Style Old Fashioned Rouge.

This is a short mixer (one part mixer to four parts rye; I used Rittenhouse 100), with wormwood and gentian root the primary flavoring components. (Cane sugar, lemon peel, and unnamed spices are also in the mix.) Gentian root is a primary ingredient in Angostura bitters. Wormwood is of course the famous flavoring (and allegedly hallucinatory) compound in absinthe. Together they create a mixer that is bittersweet, loaded up front with flavors of cloves, licorice, burnt sugar, and anise. This works well with rye, not unlike a quickie Sazerac.

That said, it doesn’t have quite the nuance that a real Sazzy has. To remedy, I’d suggest slightly less mixer and more whiskey, but at that point you’re turning a bit into the guy that orders his martini “very, very, very dry.” On the whole, it’s a fully capable mixer, though it’s not my favorite thing that Bittermilk does.

B+ / $15 (8.5 oz.) / bittermilk.com

Review: Big Bottom Barlow Trail Blended Whiskey

big bottom BarlowTrail2Edited 525x347 Review: Big Bottom Barlow Trail Blended Whiskey

It’s been a year and a half since we checked in with Hillsboro, Oregon-based Big Bottom Whiskey. For those unfamiliar, Big Bottom sources various whiskeys and typically finishes them in a variety of wine casks. While Big Bottom has previously specialized in bourbon, this latest release is a blended whiskey — and it isn’t barrel finished, either.

Ted Pappas, proprietor of Big Bottom, explains:

For Barlow, we were looking at getting the most we could out of the current bourbon supply we had. Of course, with a blended whiskey, we could have stretched it out with neutral spirits per the federal regulations, but that’s not our thing. We decided to find other whiskeys that would go well with our straight bourbon and we did. We keep the other two elements as proprietary, but the straight portion is bourbon. The other two elements are well aged and they are whiskeys. Our goal was to bring a true American blended whiskey to the market without grain neutral spirits and as it rolls through your palate, you get the different whiskeys starting with the spice from the bourbon.  The name comes from a trail that early settlers used to settle in the northwest, so it was a obvious name for us to use since this type of American spirit is somewhat pioneering.  We believe this product will appeal to the bourbon and lighter style drinkers out there in the market.

Barlow Trail is an interesting study in contrasts. The nose is quite sweet and comes across as quite youthful, showcasing some grain elements along with citrus, menthol, and nougat character. Breathe deep and there are touches of lime zest in here, too. I don’t get a huge rush that screams “bourbon” at me from the nose, but the body plays this up a bit more, offering at first some popcorn — or rather caramel corn — character. This is punched up with secondary flavors that come along later, offering notes of butterscotch pudding and banana cream pie. Is there some single malt in this blend? I wouldn’t be surprised.

Youthful whiskeys can often feel undercooked and heavy on the cereal notes, but Barlow Trail feels closer to a finished product than a work in progress. (That said, Big Bottom will be releasing a Port-finished version of Barlow in the near future.) This spirit may not raise the bar the way that some of BB’s Port-finished bourbons do, but it does achieve Pappas’ goal of being approachable to newcomers and fans of lighter-style whiskeys while still being engaging enough for veterans to get some enjoyment out of. It’s also pretty cheap, so what can you complain about?

91 proof.

B+ / $30 / bigbottomwhiskey.com

Tasting Report: 6 Whiskies Along “The Highland Journey”

old pulteney 35 525x645 Tasting Report: 6 Whiskies Along The Highland Journey

I had the recent good fortune to attend an online tasting called “The Highland Journey,” a road that took us through four distilleries and six single malts, all from distilleries throughout the Scottish Highlands. Tasted roughly from southeast to northwest, the experience covered anCnoc, Speyburn, Balblair, and Old Pulteney. We sampled a range of malts made in a variety of styles, some youthful and tough, others much older and finished with fruit-forward sherry casks.

Tasting notes from the event follow.

anCnoc 22 Years Old – We recently covered a few offerings from anCnoc, but this 22 year old is something else. Lovely apple notes up front. Brisk roasted grain character attacks the palate, with a fiery note that melds well with strong sherry cask influence that hits hard on the finish. Touches of dried fruits here and there. A lovely, balanced whisky that still lets the grain shine in an enticing, attractive way — and does not feel at all like its anywhere near past its prime. 92 proof. A- / $130

Speyburn 10 Years Old – This is entry-level Speyburn, which is a perennial best buy in the single malt space. Simplistic nose, with some charcoal fire notes and a bit of raw wood. The body is quite malty, with caramel and cloves — the tougher wood character takes a nutty turn on the finish. Pleasant but loaded with an almost rustic character. Bolder than I remember. 80 proof. B+ / $29

Speyburn 25 Years Old – An older expression of Speyburn, which you don’t see as often. Aggressive citrus on the nose. Sherry character remains the showcase on the tongue, with some lightly smoky notes building as the spirit develops on the palate. Baking spices and fruit compote emerge, with a touch of iodine/sea salt on the finish. 92 proof. A- / $300

Balblair Vintage 2002 First Release – 10 years old. Woody/malty notes on the nose mask it at first, but the body of this Balblair is very sweet, almost with a granulated sugar character to it. The sweetness rises on the finish, taking on an almost cotton candy character. The finish offers nougat, caramel sauce, and a bit of dried fruit. A fun, after-dinner sipper. 92 proof. A- / $60

Old Pulteney Clipper – A new, limited edition NAS whisky from Old Pulteney. Surprisingly lively. Malty and grain-heavy up front, but with a seductive candy bar character that balances that out. The end result is something akin to raisin-studded oatmeal, a mix of savory and sweet that works. The body is modest — despite a punch of spice that attacks the back of the throat — but balanced and enjoyable. A fine everyday dram choice. 92 proof. B+ / $60

Old Pulteney 35 Years Old – A different animal in this roundup. Elevated above an otherwise solid crowd here. Notes of Port wine, sultanas, clementine oranges, and banana fill the mouth, along with touches of marshmallow. Glorious, bright sherry notes emerge in time for the finish, which melds fresh citrus juices with raisins and candy bars. Lovely! 85 proof. A / $700 [BUY IT NOW FROM CASKERS]

Review: Michter’s US-1 Small Batch Bourbon, Rye, and Unblended American Whiskey

To clarify my earlier commentary on the company: Michter’s is an old name that’s reviving its distillery operations — but while that’s getting going, the company is bottling contract-produced spirits under its own label. Label copy on this series of US-1 — aka US*1 — whiskeys is decidedly vague. The bourbon reviewed below, for example, is “made from the highest quality American corn and matured to the peak of perfection in a hand-selected charred white oak barrel… it is then further mellowed by our signature filtration.”

Curious.

We’ve reviewed Michter’s before, and no matter how secretive it may be about its sourcing, the company makes a pretty solid product. (More to the point: It tells someone else to make a solid product, and they do.) The three spirits reviewed below comprise three of the four entry-level spirits from Michter’s (the Sour Mash fourth is covered in the review linked above), so we’re finally rounding out the company’s basic offerings. As for the older stock, we’ll just have to bide our time for it.

Thoughts follow.

Michter’s US-1 Small Batch Bourbon - Aged in new oak for an indeterminate time. A bold and aggressive whiskey. Intensity from the get-go on the nose: Butterscotch, over-ripe banana, creme brulee, and cinnamon. The body takes all that and runs with it, adding brisk oak elements, apple pie notes, dried figs, and a touch of red hot candies. That bit of heat doesn’t last. The finish is seductive and supple, offering a wonderful balance between dusty wood and brown sugar sweetness. An excellent buy, the dearth of data on the spirit notwithstanding. Reviewed: Batch #14C123. 91.4 proof. A / $40

Michter’s US-1 Single Barrel Straight Rye – Aged 36 months-plus in new oak; otherwise no mashbill information is offered. Clear, spicy rye notes on the nose, with a dusting of sawdust. As the body develops, you get lots of caramel apple, more intense wood, and some bitter chocolate notes. While the nose offers tons of promise, frankly I was hoping for more on the palate. What comes across is a rather straightforward whiskey that masks its more interesting elements in lumber. Drinkable and mixable, but short on character. Reviews: Batch #14C118. 84.8 proof. B / $40

Michter’s US-1 Small Batch Unblended American Whiskey – This one’s the most mysterious of the bunch — a mystery grain whiskey that is aged (for a mysterious amount of time) not in new oak but in used bourbon barrels. The nose is immediately curious — gingerbread, molasses, and some lumber, but also tinned apples and cinnamon. The body is sweet with milk chocolate and maple notes, I’m thinking a distilled version of Sunday breakfast with some Nestle’s Quik on the menu. This isn’t a bad whiskey but it is a curious one, playing its identity cards close to the vest. Wheat whiskey, perhaps? Why not just say so? No batch information. 83.4 proof. B+ / $40

michters.com

Review: Speakeasy Bourbon

speakeasy 219x300 Review: Speakeasy BourbonSo this is an interesting one. Quietly released in a limited batch in September, the label reads that this was made by the Bardstown Club Distilling Company. However, a quick Google search reveals that this is indeed the handywork of none other than Willett, under another one of its noms de plume. This made Speakeasy all the more intriguing, given its recent string of quality offerings. And at a price tag of $30 what did I have to lose?

Not a lot, and thankfully there was plenty to gain. This is one of the most easygoing bourbons I’ve had in quite some time. It’s light and simple, with a nose of butterscotch and gratuitous amounts of vanilla, with a touch of crisp apples on the palate. Really ideal sipping for the transition from summer to autumn — and it’s a decent value. Not exactly sure how many bottles were made in this batch (or much more about it), but if you see one it may be worth picking up — especially if you’re not one who likes to pay top dollar for bourbon this time of year.

94 proof.

B+ / $30 / kentuckybourbonwhiskey.com

Review: Wines of Joel Gott, 2012 Vintage

Joel Gott 2011 11 Cabernet Sauvignon HI Res Bottle 81x300 Review: Wines of Joel Gott, 2012 VintageTo paraphrase Ayn Rand: Who is Joel Gott?

A fixture in California wine country, Gott is a longtime retailer, winemaker, and burger purveyor in the thoroughfares of Napa, where his Gott’s Roadside is a must-stop dining experience (also in the San Francisco Ferry Building). With his partners at Trinchero, Gott now has his own label — affordable wines designed for everyday drinking. We tried three from the 2012 vintage. (Random Gott bottling pictured.)

2012 Joel Gott Unoaked Chardonnay Monterey/Sonoma/Napa – Crisp with notes of lemon and apple, a very lively, easy-drinking Chardonnay. Touches of fig and vanilla ice cream emerge on the finish, giving it a bit too much sweetness, but at this price it’s hard to resist. A- / $13

2012 Joel Gott “Alakai” Grenache California – A big, fruity wine, but plenty shy of turning into jam in a bottle. The nose offers blackcurrants, blueberries, and tea leaf, with ample vanilla on the back end. The body is rich, the finish lasting. Slightly sweet with the tiniest hint of red pepper (red pepper jam?), giving this a lively, summery feel. B+ / $15

2012 Joel Gott “815” Cabernet Sauvignon California – Overblown, its intense, sweet tea character pumped up with sugary grape jelly, with a nose that reeks of fruit concentrate. Canned fruit on the finish. D+ / $12

gottwines.com

Review: 2013 Mirabeau en Provence “Classic” and “Pure” Rose Wines

 Review: 2013 Mirabeau en Provence Classic and Pure Rose WinesThis Provence-based rose wine producer is making its first appearance on U.S. shores with two pink wines, the traditional “Classic” (which does not actually say “Classic” on the label) and the more modern “Pure” (label).

“Different but the same,” these two wines are made in the same basic style, but incorporate slightly different grape varietals in their construct. You won’t have trouble telling them apart: The bottles look wildly different, with the “Pure” bottling bearing a modernized, cursive logo etched onto the bottle that’s clearly designed to attract female eyes. The “Classic” *(pictured) has a much more traditional appearance.

Thoughts on both wines follow.

2013 Mirabeau en Provence “Classic” Cotes de Provence – A rose of Grenache, Syrah, and Cinsault. Floral, with overtones of strawberry and orange flowers. Light as a feather, with brisk fruit that wisps away on a short, fresh finish. Quite pleasant. B+ / $16

2013 Mirabeau en Provence “Pure” Cotes de Provence - A blend of  high-altitude Grenache, Syrah, and Vermentino grapes. A bolder, fruitier wine, and with a bent more toward the racy raspberry side of the fence than the sweeter, strawberry side. A pleasant, sorbet-like finish hints at herbal notes — syrah driven, perhaps — but those raspberries hang in there until the end. B+ / $21

mirabeauwine.com

Review: Trianon Tequila

Trianon Anejo 256x1200 Review: Trianon TequilaTrianon is a 100% agave tequila hailing from the Lowlands, available in the usual three expressions. All are 80 proof, and we review all three below.

Trianon Tequila Blanco – Sedate and seductive on the nose, the agave here seems dialed way back, and a touch sweet based on the honeyed aroma. The body plays down herbal and earth notes in favor of showcasing how restrained a blanco can be. Notes of spun sugar and light honey dominate. A character akin to chomping into a stalk of crisp celery is about as close as it gets to agave essence, though some hints of black pepper, red chilies, and matchsticks remind you it really is a tequila. If restraint and “smoothness” is what you’re looking for in a tequila, look no further than Trianon. For me, it might be playing things a bit too close to the vest, to the point where it’s hiding a bit of its essence. B+ / $38

Trianon Tequila Reposado – Rested for six months in a mix of French and American oak barrels. The nose starts off with some unusually winey, citrus characteristics, almost sharp to the nostrils with orange and lemon peel notes. The body’s a totally different story. Here, the sweet characteristics of the blanco are pushed to the max, the spirit starting off with a kind of sugary breakfast cereal character before diving headlong into a finish that favors marshmallow fluff and caramel syrup just barely flecked with cracked black pepper. Given the sweetness of the blanco, the sugariness of the reposado isn’t totally surprising — but it makes me wonder what’s left for the anejo… B+ / $50

Trianon Tequila Anejo – Deep brown in color, this anejo spends 18 months in the same French/American oak barrels used for the reposado. Sugar bomb? Not quite. The nose is quite a bit more austere than expected, those winey characteristics on the nose taking on more of a Port character and the essence of chocolate syrup. This leads to a body that is, as expected, full of sweetness, but which features more of a carmelized/brown sugar character akin to creme brulee crust. The agave notes are pretty much gone at this point, this anejo offering some vaguely vegetal character only on the downswing of the finish. This racy heat however does stick with you for quite a while, battling with sugary notes that threaten to choke you into submission. A fun study in opposites. A- / $57

tequilatrianon.com

Review: Samuel Adams Kosmic Mother Funk Grand Cru

035 525x700 Review: Samuel Adams Kosmic Mother Funk Grand CruKeep your eyes open for the KMF: Samuel Adams’ limited edition grand cru beer, formally known as Kosmic Mother Funk.

An aged Belgian style ale, it spends a full year in Hungarian oak casks, and here’s why:

The inspiration for Kosmic Mother Funk is Belgian beer styles and brewing techniques including blending, aging and conditioning beers for wild and flavorful results. The Samuel Adams brewers began by taking a Belgian ale and aging it in Hungarian oak tuns and as time went on the beer continued to evolve and take on a life and character of its own, only to be described as a kosmic collection of flavors. The porous character of the wood allows air to slowly seep into the beer during secondary fermentation, smoothing out any harsh flavors. Wild yeast and bacteria including Brettanomyces and Lactobacillus also interact with the aging brew, imparting unique spicy, fruity and bright tart flavors.  Long contact with the wood imparts its own flavors of oak and vanilla.  This unique brew was then blended at varying levels into a series of Belgian brews, the manifestation of which became the Samuel Adams Barrel Room Collection.

sam adams gmf 146x300 Review: Samuel Adams Kosmic Mother Funk Grand Cru“Kosmic Funk” is pretty much right. This is a wild concoction that would immediately explode the zombie head of Adolphus Busch. The nose reeks of a typical sour beer — sour cherry, sawdust, and vinegar notes. That acidic, throat-scorching cherry vinegar character hits hard on the palate, a smattering of malt oddly complementing the wild, almost abrasive brew. Compelling, but it’s a massive undertaking to get your arms around it. This isn’t something most of us are likely to consume on a regular basis — which is a good thing, since the only way you can try KMF is by encountering it on the KMF roadshow. See the link below for a location near you.

6.4% abv.

B+ / not on sale / samueladams.com

Review: The Last Drop 1950 Fine Aged Cognac

last drop 1950 cognac 525x525 Review: The Last Drop 1950 Fine Aged Cognac

The Last Drop is a company with an amazingly fun story: It sources its spirits from shuttered, abandoned, or “lost” distilleries. When you buy the company’s product, that’s it. They’re gone and no one is going to make them again.

That’s a powerful promise of rarity. The Last Drop says it “found these casks in a tiny distillery lost in the woods near Cognac.” So, yeah, you aren’t getting any more of this stuff.

The Last Drop 1950 starts with a classic Cognac nose of old fruit, raisins, incense, and well-aged wood. It’s got a bit of a funky, almost burning undercurrent to it — like an old rhum agricole — offering notes of coconut husk and fuel oil. The body is immediately austere, with sherried stone fruits, balsamic, and oiled leather. With a salted caramel/cocoa powder back end, things start to go out on a lightly sweet high note, but the finish is so drying and woody that it sucks all the fruit away completely, ending on an almost astringent overtone.

That said, it’s a unique Cognac and an excellent example of what very old brandy is like. At this price, though, you might want something that’s still firing on all cylinders, and which is more balanced from start to finish.

83.6 proof. 478 bottles made (each includes a 50ml miniature as a bonus).

B+ / $2,600 / lastdropdistillers.com

“Dark” Wine Roundup: 2012 Menage a Trois Midnight and 2012 Gnarly Head Authentic Black

Teeth not stained enough for ya? Try Midnight, a new “dark red” wine from Menage a Trois, or Authentic Black, Gnarly Head’s take on the theme of vinified darkness that suddenly seems to be all the rage in the wine world right now. Which “dark red” wine should earn your late night affections? Read on.

bottle midnight 103x300 Dark Wine Roundup: 2012 Menage a Trois Midnight and 2012 Gnarly Head Authentic Black2012 Menage a Trois Midnight Dark Red Blend California – Composed of 44% Merlot, 42% Cabernet Sauvignon, 11% Petite Sirah, and 3% Petit Verdot, there’s nothing really unusual about the makeup of Menage a Trois Midnight, though it’s certainly completely opaque. like many a deep red wine There’s no real information about why the wine is so dark. I expect the addition of Petite Sirah, well known for its deep color, is the primary culprit. Midnight is fine, if undistinguished red. Violet notes do just fine alongside red berries and plum notes, with a touch of chocolate underpinning things. Slightly sweet and quite unctuous, the wine has a silkiness that makes it work best either with dessert or before dinner. B+ / $12

gnarly head authentic black 78x300 Dark Wine Roundup: 2012 Menage a Trois Midnight and 2012 Gnarly Head Authentic Black2012 Gnarly Head Authentic Black Lodi – No blend information available except that this is “Petite Sirah” based. Again, that makes sense, and this wine is even darker in color than Midnight. Jammy to the point of being syrupy, the body is dark currents, Port-like chocolate syrup, and touches of pepper jelly. The finish comes across as impossibly sweet, taking this wine just a step too far into the world of dessert wines. B- / $12

Review: Samuel Adams Octoberfest

sam adams octoberfest 300x200 Review: Samuel Adams OctoberfestSamuel Adams has a beer for every season, so of course an Octoberfest brew is in the hopper. This seasonal Munich-style/Marzen lager offers warming, roasted grain notes up front, plus touches of sweet maple syrup, cocoa powder, and cinnamon. Well balanced between its grain-focused notes and the sweetness of its malt, this is an Octoberfest brew that feels both festive and easy to drink at the same time. Sure, it may be made far from the beer halls of Germany, but for stateside drinkers it does the trick.

5,3% abv.

B+ / $13 per 12-pack / samueladams.com

Review: Roca Patron Tequila

Roca Patron Reposado 525x494 Review: Roca Patron Tequila

Quien es mas rico? No es Patron. Es Roca Patron.

If standard Patron isn’t ritzy enough for you, now there’s Roca Patron, an artisanal version of the tequila classic. What’s a roca? And how is this different from the regular bottling? In Patron’s words:

Roca Patrón starts with a tahona, a giant two-ton stone wheel hand-carved from volcanic rock (roca) that slowly crushes the cooked agave to break the bonds of fiber and release the rich agave juice. From here, both the juice and the agave fiber are placed together into wooden fermentation vats for 72 hours, and then distilled in small-capacity copper pot stills. Only a handful of the more than 150 working tequila distilleries in Mexico still utilize the tahona process.

While Roca Patrón is the company’s first line of tequilas crafted exclusively from the tahona process, the process itself is nothing new to Patrón. From the brand’s very beginning, every tequila in the Patrón portfolio has included tahona tequila in the blend. The core line of Patrón tequilas, and Gran Patrón Platinum and Gran Patrón Burdeos, are created from a combination of tahona tequila and tequilas produced from the more modern roller mill process. Patrón has also recently introduced a tahona-only extra añejo, Gran Patrón Piedra.

The aged variants are rested in single-use American bourbon barrels – Roca Patrón Reposado for five months, Roca Patrón Añejo for 14 months; this differs from the core Patrón line, which are aged in a blend of new and used oak barrels. The Patrón master distiller determined that the ideal flavor characteristics of Roca Patrón Silver came through at 45 percent alcohol (90 proof). Similarly, Roca Patrón Reposado is optimal at 84 proof, and Roca Patrón Añejo at 88 proof.

We tried the blanco, reposado, and anejo expressions. Thoughts follow:

Roca Patron Blanco Tequila – Silver, unaged. Classically herbal on the nose, grassy with lemon/lime overtones. Surprisingly similar on the palate. This is more vegetal than standard Patron — or, more accurately, my memory of the last time I had Patron — with more bite, more acidic tang, and a clear focus on fresh herbs. A lot of this is likely due to the 45% alcohol that Roca Blanco is bottled at. A fully capable but decidedly simplistic blanco; you’ll find more nuance and depth of flavor in other bottlings on the market. 90 proof. B+ / $70

Roca Patron Reposado Tequila – Aged 5 months. The nose is quiet, with a crisp focus on lemon — think lemon meringue pie — and agave in the distant background. The body is silky as all get out. This is the kind of tequila people will invariably describe as “smooth” as they knock it back a handle at a time. It’s got just the right consistency, melding the bite of agave with more lemony citrus, vanilla custard, a dusting of cinnamon, and a touch of woody lumberyard notes. The finish fades from sweet and soothing to drying and clean with a twist of lime, a nifty little trick and one that will sure have happy drinkers ordering a second shot at the bar. Firing on all cylinders. 84 proof. A / $80

Roca Patron Anejo Tequila – Aged 14 months. Exotic nose. Lots of agave hanging in there at first, bringing aromas of rosemary and sage to mingle with some burnt marshmallow and anise notes. But after a sip or two you clearly see the impact of wood just having its way with this spirit. 14 months isn’t all that old for a solid anejo, but here the astringent wood barrel notes nonetheless overpower both the agave notes and the sweetness you’d normally see from barrel aging. Instead of that classically anejo silky caramel character we get a slug of raw lumberyard that dominates the spirit and never lets up. A disappointment considering the promise of the reposado. 88 proof. B / $90

All in all: A mixed bag, but I can think of nothing but this when the bottle’s in front of me.

patrontequila.com

Tasting Report: Rosso Montefalco and Montefalco Sagrantino, 2014 Releases

2003MontefalcoRosso btl 91x300 Tasting Report: Rosso Montefalco and Montefalco Sagrantino, 2014 ReleasesWelcome to Montefalco, “the balcony of Umbria” in the backyard of Tuscany. Montefalco is a relatively little-known wine region in the U.S., known primarily as the birthplace and home of Sagrantino, a grape that thrives in the hills of this area. Sagrantino (from “sacrament,” called thusly because dried Sagrantino grapes have been used by monks to produce raisin-based wines for centuries) makes for a massive, classically Italian wine. It is said that Sagrantino wines have some of the highest levels of tannins in any commercially produced wine in the world, so feel free to open these well before you drink them and watch them evolve in the glass.

A recent virtual tasting put on by the Consorzio Tutela Vini Montefalco and broadcast from the heart of Montefalco let us Americans sample a collection of eight recent vintages — four pure Sagrantino bottlings and four Montefalco Rosso bottlings. (Montefalco Rosso is a blend that typically includes heavy Sangiovese and a smaller proportion of Sagrantino, among other international varietals.)

Thoughts on the eight wines — exhibiting some remarkably similar DNA while showing off unique flourishes here and there — which were sampled follow.

2010 Le Cimate Montefalco Rosso DOC – 60% Sangiovese, 15% Merlot, 15% Sangrantino, 10% Cabernet Sauvignon. A touch of barnyard on the nose doesn’t mar an otherwise fun, fruity Rosso. Bright cherry and strawberry notes attack up front, with more earthy elements taking hold on the back end. Shortish, drying finish. B / $20

2010 Arnaldo Caprai Montefalco Rosso DOC – 70% Sangiovese, 15% Sagrantino, 15% Merlot. Firing on all cylinders, this Rosso features a well-balanced body that keeps baking spices, dried fruits, tobacco, and fresh cherries all in check. Long finish, with the herbal notes rising to the top. Quite food friendly. A- / $22

2010 Antonelli Montefalco Rosso DOC – 65% Sangiovese, 15% Sangrantino, 10% Merlot, 10% Cabernet Sauvignon. Sedate and undemanding, this lightly vegetal Rosso drinks without much fuss, a steady wine that brings fennel, licorice, rosemary, and thyme to the forefront. Very compacted fruit on the back end, as the wine plays everything close to the vest. B / $18

2010 Tenute Lunelli Ziggurat Montefalco Rosso DOC – 70% Sangiovese, 15% Sagrantino, 15% Cabernet/Merlot.Dry but balanced with fruit, this wine features notes of violet mingled with its blackberry core. Vanilla and strawberry notes emerge over time. This one’s well balanced and easy to enjoy either on its own or with a meal. A- / $15

2008 Scacciadiavoli Montefalco Sagrantino DOCG – Initially very austere and restrained. Intense herbal character, almost bitter with tree bark and root notes. Given significant time the wine opens up to reveal blackberry notes, plums, and a little brown sugar — but its huge bramble and balsamic character dominates through the finish. Hearty as all get out. B+ / $40

2009 Tenuta Bellafonte Montefalco Sagrantino DOCG – Immediately more fruit up front, with some barnyard notes in the background. In the glass, the wine develops more of a fruit punch character to it, with plum and cran-apple flavors evolving. The finish shows tannin, but is nowhere near as overwhelming as the Scacciadiavoli. B / $50

2010 Romanelli Montefalco Sagrantino DOCG - Quite an enchanting nose — floral and fruity. Clear floral notes on the palate, with notes of violets and strawberry. The chewy, tannic finish takes things more to licorice than balsamic. B+ / $37

2009 Perticaia Montefalco Sagrantino DOCG – Heady aromas of blueberry and some baking spice. The sweetest wine of the bunch by a longshot, which is a huge help in cutting through the tannin, which grows on the back end as the wine develops on the palate. Notes of eucalyptus leaf and menthol find their way into the finish. B+ / $40

consorziomontefalco.it

Review: Wilderness Trail Distillery Harvest Rum

harvest rum 525x787 Review: Wilderness Trail Distillery Harvest Rum

How’s this for unique? Harvest Rum is made by Kentucky-based Wilderness Trail Distillery from molasses made from cane sorghum grown right on the company’s own farm. The rum is then aged in used Four Roses bourbon barrels for “several” months.

It’s tough to imagine more of a “bourbon drinker’s rum,” and Harvest is indeed surprisingly whiskeylike. The nose isn’t immediately evocative of either spirit, a curious mix of green papaya, peanut butter, and saltwater taffy. The body kicks in with some bubble gum, vanilla cookies, and light hospital character… then the sweetness fades as the more woody astringency comes to the forefront. The finish is bittersweet and lightly chocolatey, with strong black pepper overtones.

Harvest says this drinks like a bourbon and finishes with a rum, but I think they’ve got it backwards. I found the more candylike rum characteristics at the start, with the more wood-driven notes (which I more closely associate with whiskey) on the back end. Your mileage my vary. Either way, it’s fun to take the drive.

95 proof. Reviewed: Batch #1. (Proof level will vary among batches.)

B+ / $20 (375ml) / wildernesstracedistillery.com

Preview: Cognac Lheraud Cuvee 20 and 1974 Vintage

011 525x393 Preview: Cognac Lheraud Cuvee 20 and 1974 Vintage

Cuvee Lheraud (lerr-oh) is a family-owned Cognac producer that makes a million bottles of brandy every year all from its estate vineyards. And you’ve never heard of them, because until now they have not sold products in the United States.

This fall, Lheraud arrives on U.S. shores, bringing its unique spin on Cognac to our esteemed shores. While it makes single-vintage editions much like many other high-end producers, it also takes the same approach to its higher-end non-vintage dated blends. As Export Manager Francois Rebel explained to me on a recent visit to San Francisco to introduce the brand, the various cuvee bottlings, including the 20 year old Cuvee 20, are made from casks of exactly that age. This year’s Cuvee 20 was made from casks distilled in 1994. Next year it’ll be 1995 casks, and so on. Doesn’t this cause a problem with consistency from year to 0131 300x225 Preview: Cognac Lheraud Cuvee 20 and 1974 Vintageyear, if you can’t blend from other vintages to achieve a flavor profile that doesn’t vary from year to year? Yes. But that’s the way we do it, says Rebel. Some years customers may not like the changes, but “Lheraud does not blend.”

Neat idea, though I could never get a clear explanation of why the Cuvee 20 doesn’t indicate it’s a Cuvee 20 distilled in 1994 — which would seem to boost sales. Ah, the French!

Rebel tasted me on two of the distillery’s upcoming releases, and my thoughts are below. Note: Our sampling was quite limited to small tastes, so these should be considered preview descriptions and ratings and not canonical reviews. Prices are estimated based on overseas pricing. Will update with official pricing when it is available.

Cognac Lheraud Cuvee 20 (2014 Bottling) – Made from grapes from the Petite Champagne region. Classic style for a Cognac this age, light incense and raisin notes atop a sweet core that offers oaky, almond, and honey notes on the palate. Easy to like. 86 proof. B+ / $70

Cognac Lheraud 1974 Vintage – Made from Grand Champagne-grown grapes. A 40 year old bottling, bottled at cask strength — unusual for any Cognac. More exotic on the nose than the Cuvee 20, it offers darker chocolate and nut character, dark raisins, dried figs, and drying, resinous oak on the finish. Less sweet than the Cuvee, but it still has plenty of sugar to go around. Complex and worthwhile. 98 proof. A / $500+

cognac-lheraud.com

Review: Laphroaig Select Single Malt Whisky

laphroaig select 525x700 Review: Laphroaig Select Single Malt Whisky

Another step in the “NAS” (no age statement) movement that’s sweeping the whisky world, Laphroaig Select is a new expression from the Islay standby that is deathly devoid of numerics.

Laphroaig’s approach with this release is an interesting one, taking a variety of styles of the whiskies in its stable and mixing them all together. Select was made from a mix of Quarter Cask, PX Cask, Triple Wood, and straight 10 Year Old barrels. During development, six different blends were produced from these four spirits, after which Laphroaig fans voted on their favorite. They picked this one — and even chose the name, Select, which is at once incredibly boring and surprisingly descriptive.

It’s a fine little Scotch, even if it’s unlikely to knock your socks off. Here’s how it presents itself.

It’s straight up smoky peat on the nose, with some barnyard notes, giving Select a rather rustic character, at least at the start. The body is easier than the olfactory build-up would indicate. Dry and restrained, it offers hints of old sherry blended with waxy candle smoke, giving the spirit a bit of a holiday feel, with indistinct vanilla and baking spice notes coming along as the finish builds. As with any Laphroaig expression, ashy peat notes dominate the spirit from front to back, but with Select the distillery dials things back a bit to reveal a kinder, gentler Laphroaig that novice Islay drinkers will likely find approachable, but which peat-drinking veterans will still be able to enjoy.

B+ / $60 / laphroaig.com