Review: 2014 Charles & Charles Rose Columbia Valley

Charles and Charles Rose cap 014

We reviewed the 2013 bottling of this wine and are back with a new vintage. This year’s version of the Washington state rose is made from a blend of 72% syrah, 8% mourvedre, 8% cabernet sauvignon, 6% grenache, 3% cinsault, and 3% counoise. Nicely floral with rose petal and crushed violets up front, it slides into pretty red fruits, strawberry, and a touch of vanilla cream. Perfect for summer.

B+ / $12 / bielerandsmith.com

Review: Ecliptic/Wicked Weed/Stone Points Unknown IPA

pointsunknown_bottle_4webIt’s time for another three-way collaboration from Stone, bringing in Portland, Oregon’s Ecliptic Brewing and Asheville, North Carolina’s Wicked Weed. As if three breweries wasn’t tough enough to pull together, what Stone has done with Points Unknown is take two divergent beers and blend them together.

Three-quarters of the beer is a west coast-style double IPA. The other quarter is a Belgian tripel, barrel aged for four months in casks that first held red wine and then held tequila. It may say “IPA” on the label, but what’s inside is much more than that.

If this all sounds complicated, try tasting it. Both elements of the brew are well represented here, with the tripel starting things off with a malty, slightly spicy character featuring notes of cloves, coffee beans, and just a touch of sour cherry. The IPA element ultimately takes over, though, offering bracing bitterness, much more citrus-focused than it is piney. Some bitter root notes emerge with time, but it’s those sour cherries that stick with me the most. It’s a complicated — and not entirely cohesive — beer, but it’s easily worth a try while you can still nab it.

9.5% abv.

B+ / $9 per 22 oz. bottle / stonebrewing.com

Review: Grand Macnish Six Cask Edition

Grand Macnish 6 Cask_btThis new blended malt from Grand Macnish includes whisky from six single malts — one each from the Highlands, Speyside, Islay, Campbeltown, Lowlands, and the Islands — and is designed to capture the very essence of Scotland in a single bottle. Note that this is a blended malt, with no grain whiskey in it. Most of Grand Macnish’s offerings are standard, blended whiskies.

On tasting, it’s quite a light style of whisky, malty on the nose with notes of sweet barbecue sauce, cinnamon, and lots of biscuity cereal notes. On the palate, very mild citrus emerges along with some butterscotch, chocolate, some raisin, and a touch of fig. The body is minimalistic, almost to the point of being watery, but it’s nonetheless surprisingly effective at getting its flavor across. The finish returns to the cereal notes, with just a wisp of smoke (hi there, Islay), coal dust, and heather.

Those looking for a complex whisky probably won’t find much of interest here, but for an everyday blended malt it has a lot more going on than you might expect.

80 proof.

B+ / $32 / macduffint.co.uk

Review: Old Forester Whiskey Row Series – 1897 Bottled in Bond Bourbon

Old Forester 1897 Bottle Shot

Last year Old Forester got started with its new Whiskey Row Series of Bourbons with its 1870 Original Batch Bourbon, meant to recreate the company’s batching process that it introduced in that year. Now comes OldFo’s 1897 Bottled in Bond, the next in the series, is bottled in honor of the 1987 Bottled-in-Bond Act and a recreation of Old Forester’s production at the time. Lightly filtered and stored in a federally bonded warehouse for at least four years, it is bottled at 100 proof (as specified by the BiB regulations).

This is a blazer of a bourbon, with an instantly, notably hot nose. Push through the raw alcohol notes and you get lumberyard, gingerbread, and butter cookie notes, all in a row. On the palate, the heavy alcohol character takes a while to dissipate, but eventually it opens with either time or a bit of water. Here you’ll catch notes of (more) gingerbread, buttered toast, cloves, and plenty of wood notes. Over time, banana notes and some raw cereal character emerge. The classic Bourbon vanilla notes are a bit dulled here, giving this whiskey a more rustic composition, but that may just be what Old Forester had in mind in whipping this whiskey up.

It’s (already) not my favorite in the lineup, but as a look back to the past, it’s a worthwhile experiment.

100 proof.

B+ / $50 / oldforester.com 

Review: Deschutes Pinedrops, Foray, Twilight 2015, and The Stoic 2015

foray deschutes

We’ve been falling behind on Deschutes’ beer releases, so here’s a look at four new/seasonal/reissued bottlings hitting in time for summer sipping!

Deschutes Brewery Pinedrops IPA – Formerly an experimental brew served only on tap (and amde with Chinook, Centennial, and Equinox hops), this year Pinedrops goes into year-round rotation in bottles. A burly IPA with resin a plenty and ample, earthy undertones. More forest floor than canopy, there’s some mushroomy notes and a bit of stewed prune character to balance the gentler citrus peel and pine needle elements. A more brooding, less cleansing (but plenty bitter) expression of IPA. 6.5% abv. B+ / $10 (six-pack of 12 oz. bottles)

Deschutes Brewery Foray IPA – This new addition to the Deschutes Bond Street series of seasonals takes classic IPA hops (Nugget, Amarillo, Mosiac, CTZ, and Galaxy), and pairs them up with a Belgian yeast strain for the fermentation. The results: A bitter beer with more fruit, including some tart apple notes, some lemon, and slightly sour apricots. It’s a fun little change of pace from the usual pine and citrus focus, though not necessarily “better.” 6.5% abv. A- / $6 (22 oz. bottle)

Deschutes Brewery Twilight Summer Ale (2015) – This season’s Twilight offers a nice balance of piney bitterness and some dried citrus peel notes along with a little baked apple character. On the finish, notes of clove and nutmeg. It’s never been an overwhelmingly complex beer, but it’s a nice distraction from other blonde ales that are often a bit more biscuity. 5% abv. B+ / $10 (six-pack of 12 oz. bottles)

Deschutes Brewery The Stoic (2015) – Deschutes launched the original Stoic in 2011, and it generated a surprising backlash because drinkers felt it “didn’t taste like a Belgian Quad” — which the bear is styled after. Deschutes basically said it didn’t care and released a darker version called Not The Stoic in 20114. Now The Stoic is back with the original’s recipe, which balances Pilsner malt with Hallertauer Mittelfruh, Czech Saaz, and Northern Brewer hops plus Belgian candi sugars and pomegranate molasses. Pinot noir and rye whiskey barrels are used to gently age the finished beer. I don’t get much barrel influence here; instead the malt and molasses do most of the talking, giving this a very sweet approach and a powerful, juicy impact on the palate. The alcohol level (significant) isn’t readily noticeable, as the fruitier elements — figs, apricots, peaches, and a lacing of molasses — tend to mask it. The finish is clean but sticky with caramel notes making for a decadent — but a bit gooey — finish. 10.9% abv. B+ / $16 (22 oz. bottle)

deschutesbrewery.com

Review: 2012 Volunteer Cabernet Sauvignon Napa Valley

Volunteer_BNAAnother Tony Leonardini wine, Volunteer is a considerably higher-end offering than the Butternut Chardonnay we recently reviewed. Volunteer is a relatively light-bodied cabernet (blended with small amounts of merlot and cabernet franc), with simple notes of currants and cherries, backed with a bit of rosemary and mixed, dried herbs. The finish is easygoing, slightly sweet, with light notes of violets.

B+ / $30 / bnawinegroup.com

Review: Punt e Mes Vermouth

wb73gus-Bg2MTHlEjHJGmFSHXZTgtph_yLhOsxrJ7voCola brown in color and dense with flavor, the venerable Punt e Mes is pretty much at the end of the line in the world of sweet vermouth. As brand owner Branca puts it, “The story goes that back in 1870 a stock broker, caught up in a debate with a few colleagues at Bottega Carpano, ordered a vermouth laced with half a dose of quina liqueur using a Piedmont dialect expression: ‘Punt e Mes’ (roughly translatable as ‘one and a half’).”

Like the Alessio vermouths we recently reviewed, Punt e Mes blurs the line between a sweet vermouth and an amaro. The nose is intensely bitter, with just a trace of sweetness to it. On the body, bitter orange, cloves, and quinine dominate before giving way to a finish that’s loaded with coffee, cola, and ample prune notes. Hints of cinnamon, some sweeter citrus notes — both lemon and orange — and a touch of gingerbread also emerge from time to time. The finish is just about equally bitter and sweet, which is quite a remarkable feat, actually.

Not a vermouth to be trifled with, Punt e Mes is best experienced in moderation in cocktails that demand — or deserve — complexity.

16% abv.

B+ / $27 / branca.it

Review: 2012 Las Rocas de San Alejandro Garnacha Calatayud

Las Rocas 2012 Calatayud Garnacha 750mlSpain’s Calatayud region is where this delightful, high-altitude Garnacha from Las Rocas is born, yet it comes to the U.S. at a remarkable price. This is a surprisingly gentle wine, mild in body but loaded with flavor. Gentle red plum and currant notes plus a bit of slightly sour cherry character attack the body, which is backed with some cinnamon and cloves. The finish is lightly touched with sweetness, but not overdone. Very easygoing, it works well as an aperitif but it also excels with food — even spicier items.

B+ / $10 / lasrocaswine.com

Review: Meletti 1870 Bitter Aperitivo

That meletti_1870_hi1bright red color and an Italian name can only mean one thing: Campari, right?

Wrong! Introducing Meletti 1870, a bit of a Campari lookalike that’s designed to be used in Negronis and Americanos and other strong/bittersweet cocktails.

Of course, you can sip it straight as an aperitivo, too, and in this fashion you will find this concoction of sweet and bitter orange plus infused herbs and spices (including gentian, coriander, cinnamon, and clove) quite a little delight. The nose is syrupy and brisk with orange notes along with maraschino cherry character. Lots of baking spice emerges on the palate, with a mild bitterness to add balance.

It may look a lot like Campari, but it’s quite a different spirit. Campari is punctuated by mammoth bitter notes that start on the nose and carry through to the lengthy, heavily bitter finish. In Meletti 1870, the bitterness comes across almost as an afterthought, making for a much different experience on the whole. Melitti is focused on fruit and spice. Campari lives to sear your throat and give you that unbending grimace — in a good way, though.

Either way, try it as an alternative in a cocktail to Campari — or, better yet, instead of .

50 proof.

B+ / $26 / opiciwines.com

Review: St. Augustine Distillery New World Gin

st augustineA gin distilled from 100% Florida cane sugar? Flavored with just five botanicals — juniper, coriander, angelica, orange peel, and cassia bark — St. Augustine’s “New World Gin” is specifically designed to be citrus focused, in keeping with its Floridian heritage.

On the nose, the citrus isn’t as strong as you’d think — angelica and coriander notes, both earthier elements — make a very strong showing here, with some light pine needle notes picking up the rear. On the palate, don’t worry: Despite the cane base, it isn’t sweet. It’s a surprisingly dry gin, and the juniper is quite strong, balanced out with a slight squeeze of orange juice and a light hint of cinnamon on the back end. (This is particularly evident as the gin opens up with some air — or water, as it’s high-proof stuff.)

This is not at all a bad gin, and it grew on me over time. The balance is quite good, particularly when approaching it as a cocktail ingredient. That said, I think St. Augustine would do well to push the citrus agenda even further — a lot further — than it currently does, and really strike out into a territory that only Florida can call its own. And no, not gator flavor.

94 proof.

B+ / $33 / staugustinedistillery.com