Review: 2013 J Vineyards Pinot Noir and Chardonnay

RRVPinotNoirProduct220x680Two new wines from our friends at J Vineyards, located in Sonoma County, California. Thoughts follow.

2013 J Vineyards Pinot Noir Russian River Valley – Rich, currant-laced fruit pops beautifully in this well-crafted Pinot Noir, offering notes of slightly sweetened tea up front and coffee bean and chocolate on the back end. Touches of cloves round out a wine that sounds dense but is actually quite light on its feet. An easy sipper, it also pairs well with food. A- / $40

2013 J Vineyards Chardonnay Russian River Valley – Initially on the meaty side, this wine settles down to reveal more caramel notes, laced with applesauce and quince. Dense and chewy, it’s a big wine that wears the Russian River right on its sleeve, but ultimately reveals more charm than you’d think. B / $28

jwine.com

Review: Bittermilk Mixers No. 5 and 6

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Two new Bittermilk mixers for your approval. As always, these are non-alcoholic syrups and tonics that make high-end mixology embarassingly easy. Thoughts follow.

Bittermilk No. 5 Charred Grapefruit Tonic – Made with lemon and lime juice, cane sugar, charred grapefruit peel, cinchona bark, and Bulla Bay sea salt. Designed as a mixer with vodka and soda water (all three in even proportions). This has a nice mix of sweet, sour, salt, and bitter, all in one package. The sweet is what comes through the strongest, though — I might use this in somewhat lower proportions than the packaging advises. Better yet, skip the vodka and mix this with rum or even whiskey. I used it to make a cocktail with aged rum, mango lemonade, and the tonic (roughly 1:2:1) and it was a huge, punch-like hit. A- / $15 (17 oz.)

Bittermilk No. 6 Oaxacan Old Fashioned – Quite a departure from Bittermilk’s other products. Made with can sugar, raisins, lemon peel, cocoa, chiles, spices, and cinchona bark. Designed to be mixed with mezcal, 1 part mixer to 4 parts spirit, it’s dark and chunky, with solids floating in it. This is an intriguing one, but probably as an acquired taste as straight mezcal is. Sweet and chocolaty with a distinct raisin punch, the mixer adds a complexity to mezcal without masking its unmistakable smokiness. It’s not a cocktail I’d drink every day — and the solids settle out much too quickly — but it’s a fun diversion on a Friday night. B / $15 (8.5 oz.)

bittermilk.com

Review: Merlet Cognac Selection Saint-Sauvant Assemblage No. 1

merlet

Cognac’s Merlet is back with another new brandy, Selection St. Sauvant, a limited-edition blend that is made… well, we’ll let Merlet do the talking:

“Assemblage N°1” (Blend N°1) was bottled in 2013. This delicate cognac is a marriage of “eaux-de-vie” from the Petite Champagne and Grande Champagne aged over 10 years as well as from the Fins bois (1992 and 2001) and from the Petite Champagne (1993). The alcohol strength is then slowly reduced to allow a perfect balance of flavors. This cognac is unique and produced as a limited edition.

Quite fruity on the nose, the Cognac offers notes of peaches, tropical fruits, vanilla extract, and intensely perfumed aromatics. The body is immediately engaging, offering deep fruit notes atop quite a bit of bite, and a growing nutty character that emerges more clearly as the finish reaches its climax. The extra alcohol here is evident throughout, giving this brandy a headiness and punch that more gentler, lower-proof brandies simply don’t provide. But it’s the aromatics that lend a special character to St. Sauvant, melding gentle wood notes with clove-studded oranges, apricots with chocolate sauce. It’s a bit punchy from start to finish, but fun stuff, through and through.

90.4 proof. Less than 800 bottles available in the U.S.

A- / $100 / merlet.fr

Review: Magipatch Hangover Recovery Patch

magipatch

Zaca and Bytox have new competition in the burgeoning hangover preventive market: Magipatch.

Magipatch says it’s a “hangover recovery patch,” but that’s a bit misleading — like Zaca and Bytox, you have to apply the patch before you start drinking for it to work. The day after is simply too late. Leave it on until the following day and you’re supposed to be fine.

Comparing the ingredient list to Zaca reveals lots of similarities. Magipatch includes Thiamin, Vitamins C, E, A, D, Bs 2, 3, 5, 6, and 12, Green Tea Extract, Milk Thistle, Globe Artichoke Extract, and Chromium Picolinate. Lots of commonalities, but lots of other oddities in there too — and the active ingredients are in generally higher concentrations than Zaca. What’s the key component? For my money, milk thistle is where it’s at when it comes to offsetting the damage of alcohol consumption. (I’m not alone here.)

Magipatch comes with a plastic backing vs. Zaca’s cloth backing. It sticks on well — but it does leave a bit of residue on the skin after you take it off.

The results? Not bad at all. I wore Magipatch as instructed for a long night out and had little more than a dry mouth the next morning. My dreams were exceptionally strange that night — though it’s tough to pin that on any specific patch or ingestible — but otherwise I slept fairly soundly. Judging on history, Zaca does seem slightly more effective — provided you can keep it from falling off at night — but your personal mileage may vary.

In my analysis, as unscientific as it may be, preventive patches do seem to work — and they’re far more effective than pills or beverages you drink after the damage is done. While moderation is the best way to avoid a hangover, if you think things could get messy, Zaca or Magipatch are an excellent insurance policy.

A- / $28 for 10 patches / magipatch.com

Review: Molinari Sambuca Extra and Caffe Liquore

Molinari Sambuca ExtraAh, sambuca, the creepy Italian cousin of Greece’s ouzo — pure licorice in a clear-as-day spirit… and something we’ve managed to avoid for over seven years here at Drinkhacker. Until now!

Molinari, based in Rome, is best known for two products — “Extra,” its sambuca, and Ceffe, an anise/coffee liqueur. There’s also a limoncello, bottled under different packaging, which we’ll be reviewing in a separate post.

Meanwhile, here’s a look at the light (Sambuca Extra) and the dark (Caffe Liquore) of Molinari…

Molinari Sambuca Extra – Sweeter than a pastis, with a candylike licorice character to it. That said, the sugar isn’t overpowering, offering a chewy cotton candy character up front that fades fast to a clean finish. There’s not much to it, just punchy anise (star anise in the case of Molinari, actually, along with other herbs and oils) atop an almost fruity base. Surprisingly drinkable despite the lack of complexity. 84 proof. B+ / $20

Molinari Caffe Liquore – A dark brown blend of Sambuca Extra and coffee, this liqueur brings two classic flavors together in one spirit. (Sambuca is commonly served with coffee beans floating in it as a garnish.) The coffee dominates both nose and palate, though the anise notes offer a distinctive aromatic note as well as an herbal, mintlike essence on the finish, which is much lengthier than the sambuca’s. As with Sambuca Extra, Caffe Liquore is sweet, clean, and unmuddied, but the addition of coffee gives this a more exciting complexity that’s more fun to sip on well into the after hours. 72 proof. A- / $22

molinari.it

Review: 9 Rocks Vodka

9 rocks vodka

Black Rock Distillery in Spray, Oregon (population: 160) is the home of 9 Rocks Vodka (aka Nine Rocks Vodka), which is a triple-distilled (from what is unknown), charcoal- and micro-filtered neutral spirit.

Mild on the nose, the vodka offers a gentle medicinality with an undercurrent of marzipan and marshmallow. The body is somewhat sweeter than the nose lets on, with notes of vanilla, more marzipan/almond paste, some citrus (lime, perhaps), and nutmeg on the back end. The finish recalls some of those early medicinal notes again, but here they’re light and dusted with a fine sheen of dark cocoa powder. The denouement is clean and refreshing, quite easygoing on the whole.

9 Rocks may not have a rap icon behind it or feature an etched label featuring a wintry landscape, but it’s just as good as the imported stuff.

A- / $23 / blackrockdistillery.com

Review: NV Nino Franco Rustico Prosecco Valdobbiadene

rusticoGood, cheap Prosecco isn’t hard to find, but Nino Franco’s Rustico bottling stands near the top of that list. For 13 bucks, you get an awful lot of nuance: bubbly apples up front, light sweetness on the tongue, and a surprising herbal kick on the back end. It’s not too heavy, just a dusting of thyme and sage as the bubbles wash everything away. A solid effort.

A- / $13 / ninofranco.it

Review: Jim Beam Pre-Prohibition Style Rye Whiskey (2015)

JB750_82Good old “yellow label” Jim Beam Rye was, for many drinkers, their first exposure to rye whiskey. What was it? Aside from something mentioned in a Don McLean song? Beam’s Rye was good enough — cheap, too — like a racier bourbon, but maybe not as sweet. Or you could go for Old Overholt if you wanted something fancier in your Sazerac.

Fast forward a decade and the world of rye has been completely upended. Tons of great ryes are available now, many costing up to 70 bucks a bottle or more. Who buys Yellow Label in the face of all kinds of rye goodness out there?

Beam got the hint, and Yellow Label (more recently repackaged with a sort of Beige Label) is going off the market. Reformulated and upgraded, Jim Beam Rye has been reimagined for the premium rye era, crafted from a “pre-Prohibition recipe” and bottled at 90 proof instead of 80. Mashbill composition is not available. The new, official name: Jim Beam Pre-Prohibition Style Kentucky Straight Rye Whiskey. Just don’t let the green label confuse you, as Jim Beam Choice is still hanging around out there. (To clarify, this is now Beam’s only mainstream rye.)

And we tried it:

Deep butterscotch notes hit the nose first, ringed with hints of dark chocolate. It’s common to describe the body rye as “spicy,” but that’s often misconstrued to mean spicy with hot red pepper. What spicy often means, as it does here on Beam, is more akin to baking spice: Cloves, cinnamon, ginger, all wrapped up with some smoky bacon and just a touch of licorice. It’s lightly sweet with a vanilla custard note to it, but not as powerful as the punch of bourbon. Initially quite light on the body, it grows on you with its gentle notes of apple pie, caramel, and that slightly savory, almost smoky lacing. The finish is modest, almost short, but engaging and more than pleasant as it fades away.

I was ready to dismiss this as a gimmicky attempt to grab some share in a rapidly growing market, but whaddaya know? The stuff’s legit.

90 proof.

A- / $23 / jimbeam.com

Review: 2013 Erath “Willakia” Chardonnay Eola-Amity Hills

This is Oregon-based Erath’s first wine from its newly-purchased Willakia Vineyard in the Eola-Amity Hills. Just 238 cases were made. Says Erath:

The 2013 Willakia Chardonnay was harvested on October 12, two weeks after a series of rain showers – remnants of Typhoon Pabuk that eventually crossed the Pacific Ocean from Japan – passed through the Willamette Valley. The prolonged warm, dry period that followed the rain allowed the vineyard to dry out and provided for extended ripening and maturation of the remaining fruit. The wine was then fermented in a combination of French oak and stainless steel, before being aged on its lees for eight months in 100% French oak with 40% new barrels.

A breath of fresh air in the overoaked world of Chardonnay, the acidity up front drinks like a Sauvignon Blanc, and the midpalate pumps up the citrus — grapefruit and lemon zest. At the same time, the nose offers hints of vanilla and oak, and there’s a touch of marshmallow on the back end. All of this works together surprisingly well, making for a lively wine that balances the buttery notes of a classic Chardonnay with some bright fruit. Very food friendly, as well.

A- / $34 / erath.com

Review: DeLeon Tequila Platinum

Deleon 69469 1

P. Diddy‘s not happy to be a major player in the world of vodka. Now he wants to rule tequila, too.

DeLeon is a new ultra-premium Highland tequila, 100% agave of course, designed to go toe to toe with Patron and other top-shelf tequila brands. Available in no fewer than six expressions — including Diamante, a joven expression, and Leona, a reserve anejo bottling that costs $825 — the most simplistic (and affordable) of the bunch is a blanco: DeLeon Platinum, which runs $60 and up. All the better to pay for the fancy, thick-glass bottle, metallic stopper, and talk of traditional clay ovens and such.

And hey, celebrity branding aside, it’s a pretty good tequila.

The nose is rich with peppery notes, but also hints at lemon custard, along with some vanilla-dusted creme brulee notes. It’s got the character of a classic blanco, but it also hints at austerity — despite the fact that this is a completely unaged and unrested tequila. The body continues the theme: Spicy agave, bright lemon juice — almost candied with a sweet edge — honey, and touches of menthol. It’s very mild, and extremely easy-drinking — the same qualities that make Patron so very popular.

DeLeon Platinum is a tequila that doesn’t exactly pump up the agave, but it doesn’t try to mask it, either. Rather, it takes the natural herbal character of blanco tequila, then tosses in some natural complementary flavors that add subtlety and complexity. The end product may be on the lighter side — so approach DeLeon with the appropriate attitude — but that may suit many tequila drinkers just fine.

80 proof.

A- / $60 / deleontequila.com