Category Archives: Mixers

Review: Torani Sweet Heat Syrup

torani sweet heat 119x300 Review: Torani Sweet Heat SyrupTorani’s line of coffeehouse syrups now spans some 120-plus flavors, and it shows no signs of slowing down any time soon. The latest concoction is Sweet Heat, which has particular eyes on the world of mixology.

Sweet Heat is a concoction of pure cane sugar and … wait for it… ghost peppers, the now well-known “hottest chili pepper in the world.” Crystal clear, it gives up few hints based on the nose. Surprisingly fruity, it comes across more as an apple, grape, pineapple syrup — or some blend of the three.

On the palate, it starts off sweet (and similarly fruity as the nose would indicate), but the heat makes its presence known after five or ten seconds. Fiery throughout the mouth, it’s a big rush of spice that burns heavily, but which manages to stay on this side of overwhelming. The heat builds then fades of the course of about half a minute. The more you sip on it — or the cocktail you’ve built with it — the more you get used to it. I really like spicy cocktails and can appreciate how using this syrup in place of regular simple syrup could get you a nifty spin on any number of drinks, but I’m not in love with that fruity element, which I worry is more likely to mess up your cocktail than the spice element does.

B+ / $4 / torani.com [BUY IT HERE]

Three Days on the Juice with Urban Remedy

001 525x393 Three Days on the Juice with Urban Remedy

Behold: my fridge (in part) on day one.

So my wife got us doing a juice cleanse. It’s all the rage, ain’t it? So why not? We can all use a little detox once in awhile. It’s not a trend I’m smitten with, but I’ll try just about anything once.

Urban Remedy, like many juice providers, offers a three-day cleanse kit that includes 18 pints of organic, cold-pressed juice, which you drink over the course of 72 hours, essentially every 2 hours during daylight time. Urban Remedy actually has a number of different cleanse kits; we opted for the Signature Cleanse, which the company says is its most popular product. Each day presents six different juices to drink, ranging from the veggie-heavy green Brainiac you get at 9am to the cashew milk-based Relax that comes along at 7pm.

For a few days before the cleanse, you’re supposed to wean yourself off of big meals, caffeine, alcohol, and everything else. Largely we ate small vegetarian dishes in the run-up to cleansing. The night before we started, dinner was a sweet potato and some kale.

The next morning, we had at it.

Across the board, the juices mostly taste fine. I even found the celery-laden Brainiac to be a pleasant mix of sweet and bitter, and the addition of considerable cayenne to the #2 Time Machine brightens up its exceedingly tart composition. #4, After Party, a pblend of carrot, apple, beets, ginger, and lemon, was my runaway favorite. My least favorite, oddly, was the chalky and somewhat bland #5 juice, Warrior, which looks smoothie-like only because of the addition of chia seeds. It’s supposed to be made with raspberries but strawberries were used due to a “shortage” — maybe the raspberry version tastes better.

Hunger is of course a big issue for many who juice, but Urban Cleanse has you downing so much juice that, while it was always on my mind, it wasn’t that big of a deal at the start. What I really missed, much to my surprise, was the ritual of eating. Not just sitting down at the table but physically putting food in my mouth and chewing it up. Sounds weird, but I’m starting to think the reason so many of us snack all day is just to chew on stuff. (I’m not alone here.)

That said, at various points in the cleanse I admit I was feeling quite hungry (though not “starving”) and not entirely clear headed. I found it harder to focus on work and just less motivated, both of which were exacerbated by all the running to the bathroom to pee. (You are drinking a lot of juice here. I swear I have never peed so much in my life.) That said, I did manage to get plenty of work done over those three days, maybe because I spent so much less time eating.

On day two I woke up not very hungry, but with a bit of a headache. Urban Cleanse says that’s common, and it’s usually due to caffeine withdrawal. I’ve been off caffeine for a full week, though, so with me the effect is something else. The company also warned of decreased mental clarity on day two, but I mainly just felt tired and low in energy.

By day three I was ready to be done with it all. I dutifully worked my way through the juices, wiped the headache away with a hot shower, and tried to keep my energy up, but sitting on the couch was how I spent most of the day. Before lunch I had to carry a heavy box up a flight of stairs and by the end of it I felt like I’d run a mile. With so few calories (just 1200 per day) and almost no protein, even mild activity becomes a huge strain. By the afternoon I’d plotted out with a bit of drool on my lips what my next 8 or 9 meals were going to be: nothing insane, because Urban Cleanse suggests “easing back in” to food, and, of course, I do want to try to keep eating healthy for the long term.

I lost quite a bit of weight on the cleanse, about 4 pounds in 3 days (and more if you include the pre-cleanse time). I missed eating but it was manageable, and I never “cheated” on the cleanse during its run. Part of the idea with the cleanse is to teach yourself about healthy eating habits and reset your diet. While I’m not going to start eating flax seeds and freekeh at every meal, I am more cognizant now of healthier dining choices and, especially, portion size.

That said, I’m totally getting a steak at the next opportunity.

urbanremedy.com

Review: Tattle Tea Tea & Wine Infusion Kit

tea wine infusion kit wide 1 300x131 Review: Tattle Tea Tea & Wine Infusion Kit Tea drinkers and wine drinkers can finally come together, thanks to Tattle Tea’s straightforwardly named Tea & Wine Infusion Kit. In case there’s any mystery: You’re infusing the wine with tea. Tattle Tea provides the bags of tea (premeasured to work with a single bottle of wine), you provide the wine. You can get the three-bags-of-Rooibos-tea kit along with a nice pitcher that has a built-in strainer to get the tea leaves out ($30) or with just three bags of tea and no pitcher ($8).

Directions are easy: Dump the tea and a bottle of white wine into the pitcher and refrigerate overnight.

How’s it taste? Awful! OK, I’m being harsh, but this mix of tea and wine is just not for me. The nose is interesting — very tea forward and alluring — but the body messes with your senses in an off-putting way. Maybe it’s the wine I chose (a sauvignon blanc), but I just did not like the mix of earthy tea and tart fruit flavors. Compounding the issue, in the course of a day in the fridge, the wine had clearly oxidized quite a bit, giving the concoction some vinegary notes. Maybe if this is done with very high end wine and only for a short time (or in a sealed container), results will be better.

But why risk it?

no rating / $8 to $30 / tattletea.coffeebeandirect.com

Review: Bittermilk Mixers No. 1, 2, and 3

bittermilk no 3 525x525 Review: Bittermilk Mixers No. 1, 2, and 3

OK, yes, there are dozens of pre-packaged cocktail mixers on the market. And yes, most of them claim to be ultra-premium-better-than-you-can-make-yourself products. And — yes — most of them are passable at best, swill at worst.

Well, finally, here’s one that isn’t. Bittermilk is a Charleston, South Carolina operation that is making truly high-end mixers that even I would not hesitate to serve to my guests.

The secret is right there on the label and in the bottle: Very high-quality, mostly organic ingredients that take original spins on some classic recipes — the Old Fashioned, the Tom Collins, and the Whiskey Sour.

Bittermilk mixers have no alcohol, so bring your high-end hooch when you’re mixing something up. They may look small, but remember that each pint-sized bottle is good for about a dozen cocktails, depending on how tall you make ‘em. At a little over a dollar per cocktail, that’s not a bad deal. Hell, you’ll spend more on a couple of limes these days!

Thoughts on each of the three current Bittermilk offerings follow.

Bittermilk No. 1 Bourbon Barrel Aged Old Fashioned – Made with burnt cane sugar, orange peel, gentian root, and cinchona bark, then aged in Willett Bourbon barrels. I made versions with Rittenhouse 100 Proof Rye and with Four Roses Yellow Label Bourbon. This one comes in a significantly smaller vial than the others, since you mix it 1:4 with your spirit, vs. 1:1 with the others. Sweet up front, with ample sugar in the mix (I’d err toward 1:5 or 1:6 proportions on this one), the burnt-ness of the sugar becomes apparent only as the finish starts to build. It’s here that you start to pick up the bitter edge of the mixer, too — grated roots and bark and a quinine character — though the citrus character, essential to an Old Fashioned, never quite arrives in full. Ultimately, it’s the bitterness that sticks with you the longest, lasting long after the sweetness has faded. A completely capable Old Fashioned — though the barrel aging isn’t immediately evident, and it’s more fun to drink an Old Fashioned with actual fruit muddled into it. Much better with rye (as specified on the label). A- / $15 (8.5 oz.)

Bittermilk No. 2 Tom Collins with Elderflowers & Hops – Made with lemon juice, sugar, elderflower & elderberry, and Centennial hops. I made versions with Ketel One Vodka and Greenhook Ginsmiths Gin (the bottle specifies either spirit). The weirdest of the bunch. With vodka, the hops add a level of funkiness here, and lots of it. Up front there’s a solid sweet-and-sour character, but that initially light bitter hops element brings a bit of discord to the finish, growing as it develops on the palate. It finishes almost like a shandy. With gin, this is a much better combination, those aromatics firing just about perfectly with the citrus and the elderflower, which comes through more clearly alongside the brightness of the gin. Here the hops play a very muted role, adding just a hint of bitterness on the back end rather than the lingering power you get with vodka. On the whole it’s a success, but it’s my least favorite of the bunch. Use gin, and a bit more than is called for. B+ / $15 (17 oz.)

Bittermilk No. 3 Smoked Honey Whiskey Sour – Made with lemon juice, Bourbon barrel-smoked honey, sugar, and orange peel. I made this one with Four Roses Yellow Label Bourbon. Shockingly delicious. It doesn’t reveal much on the nose, but the body is stuffed full of a melange of sweet and savory notes — bracing lemon, silky honey, and just a touch of smokiness on the back end. If you’re not a smoke fan, be not afraid. The effect here is subtle and well integrated into what reveals itself to be a lovely concoction. The lemon hangs along til the finish, where everything comes together into a fully realized whole. Sure, the whiskey sour is hardly the world’s most elevated cocktail, but in Bittermilk’s hands it’s one you’d have no problem gulping right down… maybe two. A / $15 (17 oz.)

bittermilk.com

Review: High West A Midwinter Nights Dram and The Barreled Boulevardier

We’re finally getting around to reviewing High West’s latest products, a new rye and a second barrel-aged-and-bottled cocktail. These have both been around for a few months, so please forgive our tardiness!

high west midwinters night dram 136x300 Review: High West A Midwinter Nights Dram and The Barreled BoulevardierHigh West A Midwinter Nights Dram – Never mind the typo (it should be “Night’s,” no?) and never mind that I’m reviewing a clearly holiday-themed spirit in mid-June. Wow, this rye whiskey finished in French oak and ex-Port barrels is cherries cherries cherries from start to finish. The nose features macerated cherry fruit, steeped in vanilla and a touch of dusty wood. On the tongue, a powerful brandied cherry character emerges, with notes of ginger, vanilla cream, rhubarb, and fruitcake. OK, maybe I’m imagining the fruitcake, but the festive name of this spirit couldn’t be more appropriate. Initially a bit off-putting with its incredible fruitiness, the whiskey eventually settles down into something that’s quite enjoyable and wholly unique. Reviewed: “Act 1, Scene 1313″ of this “limited engagement.” 98.6 proof. A- / $80

high west Boulevardier 750 bottle 173x300 Review: High West A Midwinter Nights Dram and The Barreled BoulevardierHigh West The Barreled Boulevardier – A Boulevardier cocktail is composed of 1/3 bourbon, 1/3 sweet vermouth, and 1/3 Campari. Here, High West uses Vya vermouth and Gran Classico in lieu of Campari, then ages the combination in ex Bourbon barrels. Here, some ice helps to bring this to proper cocktail temperatures and to add a little meltwater to the mix. The result is an interesting mix of cocoa powder, red cherries, honey syrup, and a bitter, spicy kick on the finish. It’s a strong drink, one which benefits from slow sips and lots of reflection, as the bitter aftertaste it leads can be hard to shake. For a segment of the populace in love with the Negroni, this will probably have them endlessly abuzz. 72 proof. B / $55

highwest.com

Review: Novo Fogo Cachaca

novo fogo Barrel Aged Bottle FB9C101 525x1076 Review: Novo Fogo Cachaca

Most cachaca is barely palatable if you don’t dump a ton of lime and sugar into it to make a caiparinha, but Novo Fogo is clearly focused on quality. Using organic ingredients, the distillery produces both a silver and a barrel-aged version of its spirits (the latter is really the best way to experience this unique sugar-based spirit from Brazil). There’s even an extra-aged version called Barrel 105 (not reviewed here), the likes of which I’ve never seen from cachaca.

Thoughts on the two main releases — and a nifty cocktail kit — follow.

Novo Fogo Silver Cachaca – Rested for one year in stainless steel before bottling. Tropical notes overlay the traditional fuel-focused cachaca nose, heavy on the pineapple, with a bit of lemon underneath. The body is more traditional, but balanced, with some lemon/lime fruit notes, mushroom, cedar box, and a finish of young alcohol notes. Nothing you’re likely to sip on straight, but totally worth pouring into a caipirinha. 80 proof. B+ / $33

Novo Fogo Barrel-Aged Cachaca – Aged two years in ex-bourbon barrels before bottling. Banana and citrus are evident on the nose, which melds the fuel notes into something more approximating the aroma of coal. The body is quite a different animal, bringing toffee and peanut butter notes to play alongside milder orange character. The finish hints at those heavier alcoholic overtones, but some chocolate touches at the end. Much like a younger, agricole-style rum. 80 proof. A- / $37

Novo Fogo Antiquado Cocktail Kit – This tiny box includes a mini of Novo Fogo’s aged cachaca, a packet of Sue Bee Clover Honey, and a tiny vial of Scrappy’s Chocolate Bitters. Mix ‘em all up and add ice and you’re done (sans the fancy garnishes on the picture). This is a great little cocktail (and one you can easily make sans the kit), the chocolate playing off the cachaca well, and the honey adding a much-needed sweetness, but of a different type. Can’t find it for sale, alas. It’d make a great stocking stuffer. A- / $NA

novofogo.com

Review: Hawaiian Ola Noni Energy and Immunity

Hawaiian Ola Noni Energy Open Display  53466.1367463494.1280.1280 224x300 Review: Hawaiian Ola Noni Energy and Immunity Ola! Yerba Mate! Green tea! Hawaiian Ola’s Noni energy and immunity shots sure do sound like they’re going to be good for you. Packed with organic, GMO-free juices from a bunch of crazy looking Hawaiian fruits, these now-familiar shots are a way to get your morning jolt and at least feel a little better about what you’re drinking. Brief thoughts on the two varieties follow.

Hawaiian Ola Noni Energy – A nose of canned peaches and over-ripe apples. Much of both on the palate, with an incredibly bittersweet aftertaste, likely caused by the addition of 150mg of caffeine. Better than most “energy shots.” Try it chilled. Made me jumpy, but I don’t drink anywhere near that much caffeine on a typical day. B-

Hawaiian Ola Noni Immunity – Essentially a caffeine-free version of the above, with double the sugar and some added vitamins in the mix. Much more palatable without the gritty bitterness in it, but this time it’s a bit too sweet on the finish. Again, best chilled. B+

each about $3 per 2.5 oz. bottle / website non-functional

Review: Crazy Steve’s Bloody Mary Mixes

ghostship 300x241 Review: Crazy Steves Bloody Mary MixesCrazy Steve is making Bloody Mary mixes, dry spices, salsas, and pickles in the heart of New Jersey. (He’s also trying to help out the damaged Jersey Shore, so give him a hand.)

Our focus today however is on his two Bloody mixes (made with fresh cucumber, celery, onion, and jalapeno) and their rimmer companion. Thoughts follow.

Crazy Steve’s Badass Barnacle Bloody Mary Mix – Thick, with enticingly meaty overtones. Almost a gazpacho in a glass, it offers notes of garlic, onion, bouillon, and a bit of mixed garden vegetables. Moderate heat — it burns the lips but not the belly. All in all, there’s a great balance of flavors here, all coming together in a viscous yet easily drinkable package. Good on its own or spiked with vodka. A / $9 per 32 oz. bottle [BUY IT AT AMAZON]

Crazy Steve’s GhostShip Bloody Mary Mix – Spiked with ghost peppers, aka “the hottest pepper in the world,” hence the name. Smells great. Peppery, like black pepper, atop the garlicky tomato notes. The body at first comes off much like the Badass Barnacle, but the heat builds quickly and steadily as it settles into your gullet. GhostShip quickly rises to the level where it seems like you’re going to break into a sweat, and your tongue is starting to prickle with an uncomfortable level of heat… and then it breaks. A seasoned (ha!) heat-seeker can handle GhostShip without a beer or milk chaser, but it’s more comfortable with a little something on the side. A- / $9 per 32 oz. bottle [BUY IT AT AMAZON]

Crazy Steve’s Shot Over the Rim Spicy Bloody Mary Salt – Made with salt, red wine vinegar powder, chili powder, jalepeno powder, onion powder, cider vinegar powder, cumin, garlic powder, and some other stuff. I really like it. Most Bloody Mary rim salt is too heavy on chili powder, too light on salt. Crazy Steve has the balance right — plenty of salt (though not too much), with a kind of smoky, chipotle kick behind it. Good heat, but not overdone. Who knew that vinegar powder would be a killer secret ingredient? A keeper. A / $6 per 6 oz. container [BUY IT AT AMAZON]

crazystevespickles.com

Review: Magnum Exotics Coffee

magnum exotics 147x300 Review: Magnum Exotics CoffeeMagnum Exotics recently debuted its new line of coffees in California, with a national expansion on the way. The company behind these products is a major private label coffee supplier, but this is its first original brand being marketed directly to the public. Thoughts on two of these offerings follow.

Magnum Exotics Organic Fogcutter Dark Roast – Relatively mild, in fact I was surprised to see this described as a dark roast. Fruity, with a touch of cocoa bean on the back end. I enjoyed this brew quite a lot more than I expected. While I normally drink coffee with a touch of sugar, the fruity character in Fogcutter gives it enough balance for me to forgo any sweetener at all. A-

Magnum Exotics Kona Blend Medium Roast – A simple coffee, lightly nutty with a little cocoa bean element to it. Moderate bitterness and mild acidity offer interest to the palate, but the somewhat thin body seems to ask for cream. B+

each $10 per 10-12 oz. bag / magnumexoticscoffee.com

Review: Blue Crab Bay Co. Bloody Mary and Margarita Mixes

blue crab sting ray 108x300 Review: Blue Crab Bay Co. Bloody Mary and Margarita MixesBlue Crab Bay is an artisan food company on Virginia’s Chesapeake coast, and just a few of its products are non-alcoholic cocktail mixers. We tasted them all, both with and without spirits.

Blue Crab Bay Snug Harbor Bloody Mary Mix - Extremely thick. The nose is earthy, like a big beefsteak tomato, with mushroom notes. On the body, big and chewy tomato character, without vodka it’s almost pastelike. It starts without a whole lot of spice to note, just a hint of pepper and maybe some celery salt, with just the faintest touch of heat on the lips… but not on the tongue. This builds over time as you sip it to a decent level of burn — think a typical medium salsa. It’s a good choice for Bloody fans who find tomato to be the most important ingredient. B / $10

Blue Crab Bay Sting Ray Bloody Mary Mix – Adds clam juice to the Snug Harbor formula (this is often called a Clam Digger, Red Eye, or Caesar, depending on where you live), which strangely makes this mixer not more maritime in tone but rather sweeter and less savory. It’s not quite as thick, either. The mushroomy notes fade away as they leave behind a character that brings some lemony citrus notes and a bit more salt to bear. This is more evident when you add vodka to the mix. While overall you’ll find this to be similar to the Snug Harbor product, I think it does make for a slightly better finished product. B+ / $10

Blue Crab Bay Jalapeno Infused Margarita Mix – Coastal Virginia is not an area I typically associate with the margarita, but hey, who’s checking. This “jalapeno infused” mixer is quite easy on the spice, so heat-a-phobes needn’t be overly concerned. The mix itself is quite mild, with restrained but authentic lime notes, modest sweetness, and just a touch of heat. Fine if you’re making pitchers for a tailgate party, but not quite developed enough for your top shelf tequilas. B / $5

bluecrabbay.com

Review: Powell & Mahoney Blood Orange and Ginger Cocktail Mixes

powell and mahoney blood orange 229x300 Review: Powell & Mahoney Blood Orange and Ginger Cocktail MixesPowell & Mahoney makes high-end, non-alcoholic cocktail mixers, and recently it’s expanded its lineup to a full 10 different bottlings. Today we look at two of the latest expressions.

All of the company’s mixers are made with natural juices, cane sugar, and a smattering of natural flavors, making them a convenient yet high-quality shortcut to cocktaildom when you’re short on time. (It happens!)

Thoughts follow.

Powell & Mahoney Blood Orange – Made with blood orange, (regular) orange, and tangerine concentrates. Brisk and tangy, but not specifically “blood” orange in either taste or color. Standard Valencia orange is more the order of the day, with sub-notes of lemon and grapefruit. Still, this is a mixer that’s easy to drink and which makes for a mean screwdriver… or, dare we suggest, a Harvey Wallbanger? A-

Powell & Mahoney Old Ballycastle Ginger –  Ingredients include ginger, fennel, elderflower, and milk thistle. An odd idea. If I want ginger in my drink, I add ginger beer, or Canton, when punch is desired. P&M’s ginger provides that punch and bite of ginger, sans the alcohol or the fizz. Some earthiness starts this mixer out, then that heavy, authentic ginger bite grabs you. There’s a light lemon character on the finish that helps temper the ginger’s spice (perhaps from the elderflower), but otherwise this is both straightforward and authentic. Anyone looking to spike a cocktail with a touch of ginger — without adding alcohol — will find this a good option. A-

each $9 / powellandmahoney.com

Review: Dry Sodas

DRY Soda 5 can lockup 300x185 Review: Dry SodasDry Soda is a company making a business out of soda with no high fructose corn syrup, less sweetness, lower carbonation, and an overall healthier approach to drinking the stuff. Its products all famously have just four ingredients — water sugar, natural flavors, and phosphoric acid. A 12 oz. can typically hits between 45 and 65 calories. Nine versions are available. We tasted five for review.

All take a little getting used to, but damn if you don’t feel like a better person for drinking on instead of popping open a Mountain Dew.

Thoughts follow.

Dry Vanilla Bean Soda – Mild, not really flavorful enough. Vanilla tastes authentic, but there’s just not enough of it. The overall impact is a slight cream soda character, though not nearly as mouth-filling. B-

Dry Blood Orange Soda – There’s enough fruit flavor here to give it a little more oomph over the comparably dulled Vanilla Bean Soda. It comes off a bit like an upscale orange crush that’s been left with ice to melt, but that’s not an entirely bad thing. B

Dry Apple Soda – A success. Solid apple on the nose and on the palate. Good carbonation level, which balances the apple, offering just a touch of vanilla on the back end. B+

Dry Ginger Soda – My favorite, a simpler spin on ginger ale, with a modest bite but clear ginger notes, touched with a little citrus character. I’d have no trouble mixing with this or drinking it straight. A-

Dry Cucumber Soda – An oddity, just as it sounds. Mild cuke notes, with a kind of lime kick to it. Relatively refreshing, but just not as enjoyable as some of the others in the series. B-

$15 per 12-pack of 12 oz. cans / drysoda.com

Review: Zone 8 Honey Lemon Tea

bottle honey bg 133x300 Review: Zone 8 Honey Lemon TeaZone 8 is an Illinois-based company looking to bring high-end bottled tea to the masses. It launched on Kickstarter this summer, and though it didn’t meet its funding goals, its future seems unclear.

The company is making one expression — Honey Lemon — at present, with seven potential ones to come.

This is a blend of black tea, white clover honey, and organic lemon juice. It’s a product that expresses itself piece by piece rather than all at once. The attack is very sweet, with distinct honey notes. The tea — dense and earthly — follows, then comes the lemon. The citrus has a bit of an orange character to it — almost like Meyer lemon. Sweetness returns, almost as a hint, for the finish. It’s easy to like, though I think it’s a bit over-flavored; I’d like the tea component to shine through a bit more clearly.

135 calories per 12 oz. bottle.

B / not yet available / drinkzone8.com

Review: Camus Coffee

camus coffee 300x285 Review: Camus CoffeeWe love Camus’ Cognac. Now the company is doing a brand extension unlike any other I’ve ever seen: into coffee. Per the company:

Coffee is a natural next step for CAMUS:  similarly to Cognac, coffee is an agricultural product strongly influenced by terroir, judicious harvesting, fermentation, application of heat, and – most of all – blending.  Cyril Camus explains:  “As I started to appreciate the diversity in coffee and learn about the complexity of its production, I realized how much similarity there is between creating a great Cognac and creating a great coffee.  In both cases, a great product is the result of lasting relationships with growers, extreme care in crop selection, skilled craftsmanship in the production and transformation processes, experienced and intuitive blending, and an unmitigated drive for the best.  I came to see that the abilities and attitudes that have become part of us over nearly 150 years of making Cognac are directly applicable to coffee.  At CAMUS, we have a passionate drive for quality, and as a family business we have the long-term view and freedom to apply this to everything we do.”

So, we don’t review much coffee, but we had to take a stab at these expressions. I wonder if Cyril was inspired by this quote from fellow Camus, Albert?

Thoughts in the coffees follow.

Camus Coffee Signature Blend – A mild roast, clear nut characteristics and ample acidity. A simple, everyday roast with modest bitterness and a moderate to long finish, though the body is a bit on the thin side. B / $22 per 17.6 oz box [BUY IT HERE]

Camus Coffee French Roast – Bolder, though again quite nutty on the palate. On the whole more satisfying, with a somewhat earthy richness to the body that gives it more heft and a longer finish. A- / $22 per 17.6 oz box [BUY IT HERE]

camuscoffee.com

Review: Perrier Flavored Sparkling Waters

perrier 136x300 Review: Perrier Flavored Sparkling WatersDID YOU KNOW: Even Perrier has jumped into the flavored waters business? In addition to the classic, heavily mineral-infused sparkling water, you can also sip on three fruit-flavored versions. Give them a try in lieu of club soda or tonic water in your favorite cocktail to see how things change. Thoughts follow.

Perrier Lemon – Slightly medicinal aroma, more of a bitter lemon peel character than I was expecting. Lots and lots of mineral character shining through. Might make an interesting tonic substitute. B

Perrier Lime – A considerably stronger citrus presence than lemon, with clearer and more persistent character. Slightly sweeter, it would pair well with a mild gin. B+

Perrier Grapefruit – Very strong nose, almost like a grapefruit soda. Much milder than expected on the body, which comes across as more orange than grapefruit. Probably the most natural tasting of the bunch — it blends the best with Perrier’s heavy minerality. Probably my favorite of the group. Works very well in lieu of a splash of club soda in an Aperol SpritzB+

each $3 per 750ml bottle [BUY IT HERE] / perrier.com

Blind Review: SkinnyGirl Margarita vs. SmarteRita

skinnygirl magarita 123x300 Blind Review: SkinnyGirl Margarita vs. SmarteRita If you’re unfamiliar with the SkinnyGirl phenomenon, either you don’t go down the booze aisle at your grocery store or you’re a dude. SkinnyGirl is one of the fastest-growing brands in the spirits (and wine) world, and its vast array of “low-cal” alcoholic beverages have ladies’ night positively abuzz.

It was only a matter of time before SkinnyGirl hit the margarita world, and this pre-mixed margie is already drawing competition. One of those competitors is called SmarteRita. It may not roll off the tongue, but really we’re more concerned about how it fares going the other way.

We put the two cocktails head to head to see how they shaped up. Both were tasted blind. Notes follow.

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Making Our Own Aquavit with Spiced Spirits

The Zingy 256x300 Making Our Own Aquavit with Spiced SpiritsAquavit is a flavored Scandinavian vodka that has as many variations as there are countries in Europe. Finding aquavit stateside is difficult, though. The few bottlings imported here are mass-produced stuff that is, unfortunately, usually not very good.

Why not make your own, then? Sounds good, but the number of spices required will probably fill a shopping bag — if you can find them — and empty your wallet. And, again, you’ll need to roll the dice when picking a recipe.

Isn’t there an easier way!?

SpicedSpirits.com to the rescue, aquavit fans. This website does one thing and one thing only: It sells bags of pre-mixed spices that you dump into spirits to flavor them. While it offers ale and mead spices, it’s the vodka ones you’re probably looking for. (You can also put them into rum.) At present, eight varieties are available (plus an option to add oak chips). The names range from “The Crazy” to “The Symphonic” — and each offers its own approach to aquavit. (You can learn more about each one on its website.) Total price, $6 to $9 a pack. (Shipping is $3 to anywhere in the world!)

SpicedSpirits sent us three to try out. We followed the instructions — 7 to 14 days of steeping required, depending on the variety you buy — then sampled the resulting concoctions. Thoughts follow, but overall this is a great way to go if you want to experiment with spicing your own vodka at home.

The Sweet – Made with lemon peel, juniper, cinnamon, and “secrets.” Inspired by an Italian recipe. Lovely gingerbread character on this, touched with allspice… plus a hearty dose of juniper underneath it. I could have done with less juniper character (which gives the finish a bitter edge) and more cinnamon and ginger notes, but overall this is a festive and surprisingly sippable beverage. B+ / $8

The Zingy (pictured) – Made with ginger, peppermint, and “22 secrets.” One of those secrets is clearly caraway, which floats to the top of the aquavit and ends up in your first few glasses. (Filter this one for best results.) Not as much depth in this one, but a little mint on the nose and the finish is what earns this product its name. But the primary character here is more akin to licorice, with a slightly weedy finish. A bit more classic stylistically when placed in the aquavit canon. B / $7

The Symphonic – 25 secret herbs and spices, dang! The company calls it “hard to describe,” and that’s somewhat fair. It has light sweetness, some orange notes, and a bit of that licorice note, too. It’s not nearly as sweet as “The Sweet,” but it does offer better balance, with very light bitterness — akin to a very mild amaro — on the finish. Frankly, I’m not one to drink much aquavit, but if I am going to get all Scandi and go to aquatown, well, this is a pretty good one to visit. B+ / $9

spicedspirits.com

Review: OM Organic Mixology Wild Cranberry & Blood Orange Cocktail

OM cranberry orange 198x300 Review: OM Organic Mixology Wild Cranberry & Blood Orange CocktailPre-mixed cocktails aren’t often a high-end affair, but Organic Mixology is trying to change that with a new line of ready-to-drink cocktails, courtesy of Natalie Bovis, “The Liquid Muse.”

Made with certified organic ingredients, no artificial flavors/colors/preservatives, lightweight glass bottles, and packaged in 75% post-consumer recycled cases (whew!), this is high-end, eco-friendly cocktailery, complete with a Sanskrit “Om” trinket attached to the bottle’s neck.

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Review: Cheribundi Cherry Juice Mixers

cheribundi 300x199 Review: Cheribundi Cherry Juice MixersForget acai and yumberries. Cheribundi is doubling down on good old fashioned cherries as a juice and a cocktail mixer. We sampled a flotilla of cherry juice-based concoctions. Thoughts follow.

Cheribundi Cherry Juice – 100% juice (mostly cherry, with a bit of apple juice added for sweetness), so you better prepare your palate for the tart rush of authentic, smashed cherries. (The company says there are 50 cherries in an 8 oz. mini-bottle. Sour-sweet, authentic, and a big rush of fruit. Use sparingly as a mixer. 130 calories. A- / $12 for four 8 oz. bottles

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Review: Just Chill Natural Stress Relief Beverages (2013 Flavors)

just chill 300x214 Review: Just Chill Natural Stress Relief Beverages (2013 Flavors)As “relaxation drinks” go, Just Chill is one of the better products on the market. Since its 2011 introduction, the product has been a success, and now the company is rolling out two new flavors plus a slightly revamped can design.

Each 12 oz. can is now 70 calories instead of 50, as the cans are larger, 12 oz. instead of 8.4 oz. Ingredients are the same, there’s just more of them: L-theanine (243mg per 12 oz. can), vitamins B and C, magnesium, zinc, Siberian ginseng, ginkgo biloba, and lemongrass. Sweetening is via fruit juice and stevia, and carbonation is gentle. My comments about the relaxation effect of the drink remain about the same.

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