Category Archives: Liqueurs

Review: Kahlua Pumpkin Spice Liqueur

Kahlua Pumpkin Spice 750 US Bottle 100x300 Review: Kahlua Pumpkin Spice Liqueur‘Tis the season for two things: A seasonal Kahlua mash-up and pumpkin everything. Here those two trends crash together with the inevitable: Kahlua Pumpkin Spice.

Kahlua’s twists on its classic coffee liqueur can be hit or miss, but this one manages to work fairly well. The secret is that the “pumpkin spice” element is dialed back, quite a bit. The coffee remains on the forefront both on the nose and the attack — perhaps with a bit of nutmeg to offer. The spice element is more evident on the back end, but it’s muted, a sort of zippy finish that recalls cinnamon and allspice, but not in a heavy-handed way. The denouement is a bit chocolaty.

Unlike last year’s mess, Kahlua Gingerbread, this year’s spirit seems to have its proportions in check. I’m not sure anyone will be knocking over their fellow shoppers to grab the last bottle of Kahlua Pumpkin Spice off the shelves, but you could do worse when looking for something with which to spike your coffee.

40 proof.

B+ / $16 / kahlua.com

Review: Fratello Hazelnut Liqueur

Fratello Liqueur Photo 223x300 Review: Fratello Hazelnut LiqueurHazelnut doesn’t get a lot of love in the cocktailverse (Frangelico is pretty much your only choice), or in the world at large, outside of Nutella, anyway.

The Italian Fratello Liqueur is created at the Francoli Distillery in Piedmont. It’s made from toasted Piemonte hazelnuts that are infused with cocoa, vanilla berries, and elderflowers. Local acacia honey is added as a sweetener. The nose is huge — surprisingly authentic toasted hazelnut character, with a touch of chocolate cookie sweetness underneath. The honey comes across on the finish, something in the vein of a Nutella and honey sandwich. The body is big and powerful, despite the relatively low proof level, and the impact of the flavor is long and lasting.

On its own, it’s a bit much. As a shot to add in a coffee or cocoa drink, I’d say go for it. But my guess is its true calling is a different one, one that involves baked goods. Report back with your findings.

40 proof.

B+ / $24 / ahardyusa.com

Review: Peligroso Cinnamon Tequila Liqueur

peligroso cinnamon tequila 525x858 Review: Peligroso Cinnamon Tequila Liqueur

Bottled at the same 84 proof as its standard tequila lineup, Peligroso curiously markets this cinnamon-flavored variety as a “liqueur.” But what’s in the bottle is 100% agave blanco tequila infused with “100% pure cinnamon and a blend of secret ingredients, creating a distinct juice with a kick that leaves some sweet heat on the palate.”

The effect is surprisingly mild.

The color bestowed on this silver tequila by the spice infusion brings it into the world of anejo, and those spices push it that direction on the nose and body, too. The nose is a curiosity — earthy agave takes the front seat, with sultry cinnamon notes underneath. There are hints of red berries and a distinct floral character there too, something you wouldn’t expect to find in either unflavored tequila or a cinnamon spirit.

The body is a bit more straightforward. The cinnamon and baking spice notes are easily evident, with a strong, vegetal agave underpinning. The overall effect is something like caramel corn meets jalapeno peppers meets Cinnabon (sans the cloying sweetness). The finish is surprisingly easygoing and palatable, not nearly the bite you’d expect.

I’m still unsure what the point of flavored tequila is — a shot of tequila with a little cinnamon liqueur would let you mix things up to your own tastes — but I think what Peligroso is trying to do here is at least an intriguing and worthy experiment.

B+ / $36 / peligrosotequila.com

Review: Greenhook Ginsmiths Beach Plum Gin Liqueur

greenhooks plum 240x300 Review: Greenhook Ginsmiths Beach Plum Gin LiqueurWho knew they grew plums on the beach? This is the first commercial “beach plum gin” liqueur, and I have to imagine the reason for that is that making a liqueur out of beach plum gins didn’t occur to anyone. The beach plums in question hail from Long Island, and their juice is blended with Greenhook’s dry gin and organic turbinado sugar to create this strange curiosity.

I’m reminded immediately of sloe gin with this spirit, which Greenhook calls an inspiration. The color, a shade of cranberry cocktail, is a touch lighter than most sloe gin, but otherwise it’s a close approximation.

On the nose, things start to shift. If you didn’t know it was plum-based, you might guess at any number of ingredients based on the aromas coming forth from the glass. Watermelon, cassis, and cherry all have a home here, atop a gently sweet core. On the tongue, there’s sweet and sour in equal proportions. The initial rush is intensely cherry-like, almost akin to a kirsch. Sweet and tangy at first, you’re expecting things to stay sweet, but they quickly veer off-course. The finish is funky, almost with a cough syrup sourness to it, and a bitter edge. Mix away, but sipping straight probably isn’t in the cards.

What a curious little liqueur this is. While the balance seems off, there’s plenty going on that’s worth exploring. Try it in lieu of sloe gin, or any cherry flavored liqueur in your favorite cocktail recipe.

60 proof.

B / $50 / greenhookgin.com

Review: Mama Walker’s “Breakfast” Liqueurs

Mama Walker Group 237x300 Review: Mama Walkers Breakfast LiqueursBreakfast at the real Mama Walker’s house (presuming there is one), must have been quite an affair. Donuts, blueberry pancakes, bacon… all that’s missing is the scrambled eggs and OJ.

Presumably a scrambled egg liqueur is forthcoming from this brand, which exists exclusively to sell these “breakfast” themed liqueurs. At 70 proof, I’m not sure what makes them liqueurs vs. flavored vodkas, but that’s what’s on the label. Make your own call. You can surely use them interchangeably.

As for what’s inside, well, you’re in for something unique, to say the least. When we received our sample box, one of the bottles inside had broken and completely leaked out. The smell lingered in the house for days.

Thoughts follow.

Mama Walker’s Glazed Donut Liqueur – The nose is more like cotton candy or burnt marshmallows than donuts. I’ve smelled this before in Smirnoff’s Iced Cake vodka. They are probably spiked with the same stuff. This liqueur adds a maple syrup kick and more vanilla. The finish is ultra-sweet but also hard-edged, with a sharp, alcoholic kick. C-

Mama Walker’s Blueberry Pancake Liqueur – Extremely pungent, with a nose that is more blueberry muffin than blueberry pancake. It smells just like the muffins my mother used to make out of the Betty Crocker box, the one with the little tin of canned blueberries in it. (Do they still sell that?) Drinking this is like alcoholic nostalgia, filled with all the pros and cons that could come with a boozed-up version of your youth. My head’s spinning, but the taste — much like the nose; big, canned blueberries, bread, and a lingering, maple syrup (again) finish — isn’t half bad. B-

Mama Walker’s Maple Bacon Liqueur – Bacon flavor is always dicey in spirits, but here it kinda works. I guess the secret is to add plenty of sugary syrup to it. The bacon is (mercifully) understated next to the syrup, which Mama Walker must go through by the tanker load considering how prevalent it is in all of its products. Still, the bacon notes are distinctly there, a smoky/meaty character that has no real equal in the food world and which translates embarrassingly well to this spirit. I have zero idea how I’d use this in day to day cocktailcrafting (maple bacon margaritas, anyone?), but I’m curious to try. B

(There are recipes on the Mama Walker’s website (see below) for all of these. Tread at your own risk.)

each $13 / mamawalker.com

Review: Bols Yogurt Liqueur

Bols Yogurt Images 227x300 Review: Bols Yogurt LiqueurYou say yogurt. I say yoghurt. Bols says let’s turn yogurt into booze.

This idea is so nuts my sample of Bols Yogurt Liqueur has sat untouched on my kitchen counter for four months. I actually moved during that time, and still the Bols Yogurt has sat there, unmolested, on my new kitchen counter.

Turns out everything I was afraid of was true. Imagine watery yogurt, room temperature, spiked with alcohol. That is exactly what Bols Yogurt tastes like and, seemingly, that is exactly what Bols Yogurt is. Intensely sour, with that unmistakable yogurty funk, it looks like milk in the glass (the bottle is opaque, white-painted glass, by the way) and both smells and tastes exactly like plain, unflavored yogurt. Added descriptors are simply unnecessary and redundant. Go buy some yogurt and pour a little vodka in it and you know what you’re in for.

The company suggests it can be served neat, but this is true folly. On the rocks it is palatable, if not exactly enjoyable, but at room temp it is an exercise in madness. Cocktails might be more effective, but making a boozy smoothie with this stuff is just not in my bailiwick.

30 proof.

D / $18 / bols.com

Review: Roundhouse Spirits Gin and Corretto Coffee Liqueur

roundhouse gin 200x300 Review: Roundhouse Spirits Gin and Corretto Coffee LiqueurRoundhouse Spirits, based in Boulder, Colorado (only the 6th licensed distillery in the state), makes a trio of products, a gin, a coffee liqueur, and a “super rare” aged gin. We got to tangle with the first two products on that list. Thoughts, as always, follow.

Roundhouse Gin – Overall, a classically-structured, big gin (the company calls it New Western), infused with juniper berry, coriander, citrus peel, star anise, angelica, and orris root, plus some oddities: sencha green tea, lavender, and hibiscus and chamomile blossoms. It’s redistilled from neutral grain spirit in copper pot stills, but bottled hot. The heavy alcohol burn keeps the botanicals at bay, at least until the booze burns off a bit. What you’ll find here then starts with the juniper and marches forward with curious biscuit and pretzel notes, characters that aren’t so much driven by flowers as they are by the granary. Chocolate notes develop after that, and finally some more floral elements show themselves on the finish. I’d say the hibiscus is most on the forefront, but the red pepper you get on the very back end makes for a fun little kicker. 94 proof. A- / $30

Roundhouse Spirits Corretto Coffee Liqueur – Brisk coffee grounds on the nose, authentic as you could want. It’s a modest roast, not burnt at all. Corretto is slightly sweetened and touched with vanilla, giving it a real dessert drink quality (but far fewer calories, the company says, than competing coffee liqueurs). I wouldn’t call it complex, but it is wholly drinkable. The long finish tends to grow sweeter and sweeter, which forces the hand to reach for another sip. 40 proof. A- / $24

roundhousespirits.com

Tasting Report: Vini d’Italia Tour 2013

Our friends at Winebow, a major wine importer, host this event on a fairly annual basis, bringing some of the biggest names in Italian wine (and a little grappa) to the States for tasting and consideration. In addition, some virtually unknown brands, looking for distribution in the U.S., are made available, too. Prices below are wholesale. As always, thoughts follow on everything tasted.

Tasting Report: Vini d’Italia Tour 2013

2009 Allegrini Palazzo della Torre Veronese IGT / $17 / B+ / slightly green
2009 Allegrini La Grola Veronese IGT / $23 / A- / fresh, nice body
2007 Allegrini La Poja Corvina Veronese IGT / $68 / A / gorgeous nose, brilliant minerals
2008 Allegrini Amarone della Valpolicella Classico DOC / $67 / A / dense, cocoa, cofee, complex
2010 Altesino Rosso di Altesino Toscana IGT / $16 / B / fresh, earth meets fruit
2010 Altesino Rosso di Montalcino DOC / $24 / B / similar, some green notes, bitter finish
2008 Altesino Brunello di Montalcino DOCG / $55 / B / nose is off, heavy herbs and olive
2011 Fattoria Le Pupille Morellino di Scansano DOCG / $17 / A- / lively, pretty fruit, light herbs
2008 Fattoria Le Pupille Poggio Valente Morellino di Scansano Riserva DOCG / $43 / A- / licorice, chunky chocolate notes
2009 Fattoria Le Pupille Saffredi Maremma IGT / $103 / A / classic Super Tuscan, no complaints
2010 Leono de Castris Malana Salice Salentino Rosso DOC / $11 / A- / complex for a young wine, some jam, herbal touches,
2008 Leono de Castris Malana Salice Salentino Rosso DOC 50th Vendemmia / $13 / B+ / much more wood here, clinging to a fruity core
2010 Maculan Brentino Veneto IGT / $16 / B / light, enjoyable, fresh herbs
2010 Maculan Palazzotto Cabernet Sauvignon Breganze DOC / $26 / A- / nice balance, great everyday drinker, versatile
2009 Montevetrano Colli di Salerno IGT / $73 / A- / elegant, beautiful structure, fruit meets charcoal, roasted meats
2010 San Polo Rubio Toscana IGT / $13 / B- / heavy earth, tannic
2010 San Polo Rosso di Montalcino DOC / $20 / B- / similar, unripe
2008 San Polo Brunello di Montalcino DOCG / $65 / B- / green and tough
2010 Tenimenti Luigi d’Allesandro Borgo Syrah Cortona DOC / $18 / A- / lovely, fresh fruit and berry notes
2009 Tenimenti Luigi d’Allesandro Il Bosco Syrah Cortona DOC / $50 / A- / old vines; some licorice and chocolate
2009 Tenimenti Luigi d’Allesandro Migliara Syrah Cortona DOC / $74 / B+ / inky, almost like an Australian Shiraz in style
2011 Tua Rita Rosso dei Notri Toscana IGT / $20 / B / slight tannin, raspberries, plummy core
2009 Tua Rita Giusto di Notri Toscana IGT / $67 / A- / intense, fennel and cedar, tar, herbs follow

Spirits

Nardini Grappa Aquavite di Vinaccia Bianca / $41 / A- / powerful nose, surprisingly fruity body, lemon and citrus, 100 proof
Nardini Grappa Aquavite di Vinaccia Riserva / $49 / B+ / wood doesn’t add much to this grappa, a touch of vanilla, 100 proof
Nardini Grappa Tagliatella / $41 / B / strong cherry, bittersweet; marketed as an alternative to Campari, 70 proof
Nardini Grappa Acqua di Cedro Liqueur / $41 / B+ / like limoncello without the color, light herbal notes
Nardini Grappa Amaro / $34 / A- / slight mint, almonds, licorice touches; bitter finish, good balance

Review: Fernet-Vallet and Amargo-Vallet Liqueurs

VALLET liqueurs 139x300 Review: Fernet Vallet and Amargo Vallet LiqueursTurns out they actually make amari in Mexico. These two bitter liqueurs have their origins in 1860s, when Henri Valley left France for Mexico, staying behind to make booze even after the era of French colonialism faded away. The spirits are still made, in Hidalgo, according to the original, 150-year-old recipe.

Thoughts follow.

Fernet-Vallet Aperitivo-Liqueur – Made from aromatic plants, roots and spices including cinnamon, clove, Quassia wood, gentian root, and cardamom. Impossibly dark. Pretty cinnamon/allspice nose. On the palate, extremely bitter — considerably more so than Fernet Branca — and very wood-focused, with dark cloves coming more into the forefront. Over time, the intensity of this amaro grows on you, but those looking for more of a bittersweet experience instead of just a straight-up bitter one might be disappointed. Overall, I was hoping for more complexity than simple, bruising bitterness. 70 proof. B / $25

Amargo-Vallet Bark of Angostura Aperitivo-Liqueur – Even darker, with a purple tint. Made from Angostura bark and macerated cherries, plus spices. The fruit here makes things much more interesting, with a kind of cherry cola character that offsets the wild bitterness driven by the Angostura root. The bitterness builds and builds as the sweetness in the body fades, leaving behind an intense yet enjoyable bitter finish, full of roots, coffee grounds, and the essence of earth. 90 proof. A- / $27

haas-brothers.com

Review: Serata Amaretto di Peimonte

Serata Amaretto 229x300 Review: Serata Amaretto di PeimonteIs amaretto coming back? This is our third new amaretto review in the last year. Almonds, people. It’s what’s for after dinner.

Serata, produced in Piedmont by Fratelli Francoli, is a slightly lighter style of amaretto. The nose is heavy with marzipan but also tinged with oranges, too. On the body, that thick syrup character you get with most amarettos is tempered to some degree. It’s still mouth-filling, but not quite as chewy as you find in less polished versions of the classic spirit.

The body follows alongside the nose — almond extract with oranges bringing up the rear. I also get hints of vanilla, pistachio, and some chocolate character, too. It’s all very fulfilling, well balanced and, while not exactly delicate (I don’t think that’s possible for an amaretto), it’s refined to the point where I could actually drink it as a digestif. Almonds it is!

48 proof.

B+ / $20 / ahardyusa.com

Review: Luxardo Aperitivo Liqueur

Aperitivo USA 87x300 Review: Luxardo Aperitivo LiqueurThe Aperol Spritz is one of the all-time classic cocktails (and it’s making a comeback). The centerpiece, of course, is the Italian Aperol, a bittersweet orange liqueur which comprises nearly half the drink.

Aperol just got some competition. A new product from Luxardo (renown for its cherry-flavored maraschino liqueur) is a new spin on the liqueur, right down to the deep orange color and Made in Italy label.

I tried Luxardo Aperitivo both on its own and in a Spritz, comparing both to the standby, Aperol. The differences are notable. For starters, Aperol is very sweet and very fruity, and in a cocktail it comes off as fresh and fun. It’s not terribly complex, though, more of an upscale and very slightly bitter triple sec.

Luxardo’s got something more going on. Not as sweet, distinctly bitter-edged, with hints of grapefruit peel, root beer, and light herbs including rosemary and sage. It’s somewhere between Aperol and Campari on the spectrum (though closer to Aperol), and I find I really like where it lands. Opinions were mixed on which version was better in a Spritz — in a sample of four tasters, the men in my group (including me) slightly preferred the Luxardo version, the ladies liked the Aperol one. But we all enjoyed both renditions of the cocktail. Give it a try, and weigh in with your opinion!

22 proof.

A- / $20 / anchordistilling.com

Review: Long Island Spirits Vodka and Liqueurs Complete Lineup

LiV espresso vodka 77x300 Review: Long Island Spirits Vodka and Liqueurs Complete LineupWe’ve covered Long Island Spirits’ straight vodka before. But recently we received a fresh bottle… along with everything else Long Island makes. Yowza.

That primarily includes a long line of liqueurs bottled under the Sorbetta brand. These are simple, natural liqueurs available only in 375ml bottles. They’re all crafted from LiV Vodka (of course), fresh fruit, and sugar.

We’re also taking a look at Long Island’s coffee-flavored vodka.

To complicate things further, Long Island also makes three whiskies, which are in our queue to be reviewed separately. Stay tuned.

Thoughts follow.

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Review: Given Liqueur

Given liqueur 199x300 Review: Given LiqueurLet me get this straight: Tequila. Lime juice. Sweetened with Sauvignon Blanc grape juice. Made in Cognac, France.

Somehow all of this works.

This sort of mini-margarita in a bottle is a truly bizarre oddity, but if you’re a margarita fan, it’s worth a shot (so to speak).

The nose offers ample lime and light grape notes — that grape juice is stronger than you might initially expect. The body is initially a little confusing, reminiscent of Moscato wine, but with a backbone of honey and some earthy, slightly vegetal notes. This is the tequila at play, hanging on but drowned out by a lot of other voices — including a rising citrus tartness that hangs around with you for a long while. I even pick up notes that include ripe banana and some cantaloupe. It’s complex — especially for a drink that’s probably destined for the club — consumable as a shot, on the rocks, or with a variety of mixers.

Give it a spin.

34 proof.

B+ / $34 / givenliqueur.com

Review: Avion Espresso Liqueur

avion espresso 249x300 Review: Avion Espresso LiqueurTequila and coffee have been done before, namely by Patron with its XO Cafe. Now comes upstart Avion to challenge the natural order of things, and convince you that you need to get your coffee in your agave.

This newest entry into the Avion family blends Avion Silver tequila with Italian espresso (fancy!). It’s inky black/brown, like any good coffee liqueur, and provides a nose of quite pure, dark coffee. No real hints of agave at this point, but take a sip and the tequila base (which must be ample at a whopping 70 proof) comes through loud and clear. Give it a few minutes to settle down, though, and Avion Espresso balances out nicely, the sweetened espresso attack combining nicely with that peppery tequila slug in the finish. Rich, slightly chocolaty, and nutty, the overall effect is quite pleasing.

While I’m not sure I personally have much need for tequila to back up my coffee drinks, if you’re a fan of Brave Bulls over White Russians, it will make an excellent alternative to Kahlua, et al., in your cocktail.

A- / $25 / tequilaavion.com

Review: Breckenridge Bitters

breckenridge bitters 300x281 Review: Breckenridge BittersMost hear “bitters” and assume Angostura — something that’s used sparingly, by the drop or dash, to give a little something extra to a cocktail.

Breckenridge Bitters — produced by one of our favorite vodka makers — isn’t the same stuff. More in line with Italian amari, this is a bittersweet liqueur designed for sipping straight. A blend of “hand-harvested alpine herbs… ancient bitter roots and spicy dried fruits,” Breck’s Bitters are gold in color and slightly sweet, with a nicely bitter kick on the back end.

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Review: “Art in the Age” Sage Liqueur

art in the age sage 201x300 Review: Art in the Age Sage LiqueurSage is the fourth product from Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction, which focuses on creating wholly unique and, sometimes, questionably mixable liqueurs. These liqueurs are often drawn from historical texts and/or are inspired by curious ingredients (like gingersnap cookies). With this product, sage herbs are the focus.

Unlike AitA’s three other spirits, sage is clear. Like them, it’s infused with a vast array of botanicals to give it its character, including elderberry, pine, black tea, rose, dry orange peel, cubeb, angelica, sage (at last!), lavender, spearmint, dandelion, thyme, sumac, rosemary, licorice root, and fennel. Whew!

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Review: Caledonia Spirits Barr Hill Vodka and Gin

caledonia spirits 261x300 Review: Caledonia Spirits Barr Hill Vodka and GinCaledonia Spirits in Hardwick, Vermont primarily markets its products in the Northeast and uses honey in just about everything it makes, from honey mead to vodka and gin. We tasted both those spirits, plus an elderberry cordial from the company. Thoughts follow.

By the by: Mind the beeswax seal on the vodka and gin (they use this stuff in everything!). It’s extremely pungent and can be smelled from a mile away once the plastic wrap is taken off.

Caledonia Spirits Barr Hill Vodka – Made from raw Vermont honey, and it shows. Distinct — but richly earthy — honey notes pervade the nose, a common trait among vodkas distilled from honey. This one’s pungent enough to come across like a flavored vodka, intense with that almost nougaty, caramel flavor. Barr Hill has far too much residual character in it for the most common places where vodka finds itself, but for fans of honey, this may make for an interesting sipper. 80 proof. Reviewed: Batch #20 reviewed. B / $33 (375ml)  [BUY IT NOW FROM CASKERS]

Caledonia Spirits Barr Hill Gin – This is overproof Barr Hill Vodka flavored with juniper, and nothing else. That may sound a little simplistic for gin, which typically comprises at least 8 ingredients, and Barr Hill Gin doesn’t exactly reinvent the wheel. It’s unapologetically juniper-forward, but the strong honey character from the vodka provides a lot of balance. The nose is heavy with forest notes, but the herbal body is balanced with moderate sweetness. The finish is big and piney, lacking the citrus and earth notes that the great gins typically offer — but some drinkers may find that advantageous. Not at all hot despite weighing in at 90 proof. Batch #32 reviewed. B / $58 (750ml) [BUY IT NOW FROM CASKERS]

Caledonia Spirits Elderberry Cordial – Pungent and exceptionally sweet, this cordial (flavored with elderberry, apples, and honey) is intense with notes of prune, lingonberry, and dark, dark fruit. Almost syrupy in consistency, it’s a monstrous cordial that’s clearly designed for the after-dinner drinker who finds Port too daunting. This isn’t at all bad, but the overwhelming fruitiness is just too much for my palate. 14.4% abv. C+ / $35 (375ml)

caledoniaspirits.com

Review: Lovoka Caramel Liqueur

lovoka liqueur 200x300 Review: Lovoka Caramel LiqueurIn its minimalist, narrow, aluminum bottle, the immediate assumption is that this is water for your bike ride, not a kooky liqueur — based on vodka and flavored with caramel.

Available in three flavors (including chocolate and “silk”), Lovoka (la-vah-cah) is an incredibly popular South African “vodka liqueur” that recently expanded distribution internationally. It’s now also being made under license in Fairfield, California (noteworthy as the home of the closest Chick-fil-A to San Francisco), the base for its U.S. distribution. While the dessert theme may throw you, be advised these are not cream-based liqueurs. The caramel (the first to be sold in the U.S. and the only one we tasted) is the color of light whiskey. Which is to say, caramel colored.

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Review: Harvest Spirits Core Vodkas, Liqueurs, and Brandies

harvest spirits farm distillery 300x202 Review: Harvest Spirits Core Vodkas, Liqueurs, and BrandiesHarvest Spirits Farm Distillery, in Valatie, New York, focuses like so many other operations in this region on using local fruits to produce artisinal, farm-to-bottle spirits. The lineup below represents a full farmers’ market of goodies. Thoughts on the bulk of Harvest Spirits’ production follow.

Harvest Spirits Core Vodka – Another vodka distilled from New York apples, these grown in the company’s own orchards and triple distilled (leaving only the “core” of the spirit… get it?). Clean on the nose, with a caramel note. Slightly sweet, somewhat nutty on the body, with a surprisingly grain-focused finish. Apple character is evident on the nose, but only in passing, as the spirit opens up in glass. Intriguing and unique. 80 proof. B+ / $34

Harvest Spirits Rare Pear Brandy – Double distilled from Hudson Valley pears and aged for two years in American oak. Wood and pear — always a tricky combination — don’t come together well on the nose, here. It’s got a huge medicinal quality to it, vaguely fruity but knocked around by astringency and pungency, redolent of mothballs. The body is less palatable, more of that mothball character with a hint of pear on the finish. Just not drinkable. 80 proof. D- / $35 (375ml)

Harvest Spirits Cornelius Applejack – Named after a veteran cider presser from the company farm, this apple brandy is rested in oak barrels for an unstated length of time before bottling. On the nose: Apples? Sure, but less present than you think: This is surprisingly far more whiskey-like than any applejack I’ve had. The body backs that up, with clear vanilla notes, wood, and a smooth cocoa finish. In a world where you’d probably never dream of drinking rustic applejack unless it was the last bottle left on the back bar, Cornelius challenges what this spirit can be and proves it belongs on the top shelf. 80 proof. A- / $50  [BUY IT NOW FROM CASKERS]

Harvest Spirits Core Black Raspberry Vodka – A flavored vodka, distilled from apples and black raspberries (both local), with a small amount of black raspberry juice added back in afterward, giving it an impossible (yet natural) pink color. Incredibly fruity nose, a perfect complement to that incredible hue. Unlike the unflavored vodka, it has distinct apple notes underneath that big berry character. The body is immensely sweet (though there’s no added sugar), loaded with that raspberry — almost blackberry — character. Toss in some triple sec and you have an instant Cosmo, sans cranberry juice. 80 proof. B+ / $NA

Harvest Spirits Peach Jack – Not what you think. Fresh peaches are pitted and soaked in Cornelius Applejack, then the mix is strained and aged a second time in oak barrels. There’s a lot going on here, maybe too much. The peach is overwhelming in an old school peach brandy sort of way, and combined with the apples it all gets a bit cloying on the palate. The finish feels authentic, but rough to sip on even at a relatively modest 60 proof. I can see how some folks would be fans, though. C+ / $33

harvestspirits.com [BUY THEM NOW FROM CASKERS]

Review: Jack From Brooklyn Sorel Liqueur

sorel liqueur 152x300 Review: Jack From Brooklyn Sorel LiqueurJack From Brooklyn is a company based in, well, see if you can guess. And its sole product to date is Sorel, a unique, heavily-spiced liqueur based on hibiscus.

The recipe includes Moroccan hibiscus, Brazilian cloves, Indonesian cassia (cinnamon) and nutmeg, and Nigerian ginger. Sweetened with sugar and swirled together into a base of organic grain alcohol, the resulting spirit is Port wine-red and a wine-like 30 proof.

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