Review: West Sixth Heller Heaven Double IPA

lHellerHeavenCanWest Sixth brewing (aka: the guys that fought with Magic Hat over their logo) have been on a winning streak with seasonal offerings (I’m already counting the days until this year’s Christmas ale), and Heller Heaven is pleasantly no exception.

Lots of summer on the nose with an abundance of citrus, a little bit of pine and freshly cut grass. As expected. it is definitely sweet and floral on the taste, with tangerine and mango mixing around an aggressive kick of caramel at the end and a whole mess of hops throughout. Surprisingly easy drinking for a double IPA, this one easily bests the traditional IPA the brewery offers in its permanent rotation. Worth checking out before summer’s over, especially if you can get it straight off the tap.

9% abv.

A- / $10 per 4-pack / westsixth.com

Review: Paulaner Hefe-Weizen Natural Wheat and Weissbier-Radler NA

HefeWeizen 0.33 Liter (11.2 Oz) Bottle (TIF)What, has Drinkhacker gone soft? Another non-alcoholic beer review? I promise, we review what we get. We even review water from time to time, after all. Here’s a look at two newly available ones from Munich-based Paulaner, a bold hefeweizen and a non-alcoholic “weissbier-radler.”

Paulaner Hefe-Weizen Natural Wheat – Aka “Naturtrüb” if you want to get your Deutsch on. This isn’t your girlfriend’s hefeweizen but rather a burlier, chewier, and more hoppy style of the classic wheat brew. As the light bitter elements fade the beer evokes notes of lemon, grapefruit, and tropical notes. The finish offers more cereal, with a bit of almond character to it. Hefeweizen is never my go-to beer style, but Paulaner really does a stand-up job with this “natural” expression. 5.5% abv. B+ / $2 per 16.9 oz. bottle

Paulaner Weissbier-Radler Non-Alcoholic – “With lemon juice.” This is basically a shandy in a bottle, but in lieu of lemonade it tastes like something akin to lemon marmalade has been added to the mix. Incredibly sweet, there’s no beer character here at all, but rather a sticky, sweet-and-sour combination of flavors that come across like something your kids would probably enjoy. I understand when folks can’t drink, but there’s no reason to punish them for it. D- / $9 per six-pack

paulaner.com

Drinking in Dublin: Guinness Storehouse and Teeling Whiskey

Howdy, everyone. Just back from the British Isles, where I spent nearly two weeks exploring Ireland and Scotland, two of the lands whose names are inexorably linked with the world of whiskey. This is the second of two travel pieces on major drinking attractions across the pond — this one focusing specifically on the city of Dublin.

Ireland boasts a handful of distilleries, but they are spread all around the island and visiting them takes quite a bit of doing. We devoted our time in Ireland largely to Dublin (with one day trip to the countryside by bus), but you can do a lot of boozy exploration without having to venture far from the city center.

In addition to a wealth of pubs and whiskey bars, Dublin boasts at least three attractions dedicated to drink. I skipped one of them, the “Old Jameson Distillery,” which is really just a museum and not a working still. Locals regard it as a tourist trap, so I focused on these two spots, both of which I heartily recommend visiting.

Guinness Storehouse

Dublin is the home of Guinness, and the Guinness Storehouse is the mecca for all fans of this archetypal stout. Yes it is chock full of tourists. Yes it is still well worth visiting.

The Storehouse is part museum, part experience, located adjacent to the brewery itself, which is a massive sprawling area that spans a couple of city blocks. Inside the Storehouse you’ll access a multi-story tour about how Guinness is made, and your ticket will also get you at least a pint or two of Guinness to enjoy while you’re making the rounds. The top floor, called the Gravity Bar, boasts panoramic views of all of Dublin. It’s extremely crowded, though; better to spend your time in the bar two stories below, where you are taught how to pour the perfect pint — and get to pull one for yourself to test your skills.

True enthusiasts will want to upgrade to the Connoisseur VIP experience, which comprises a 90-minute tasting of all of Guinness’s major versions worldwide, including a history lesson and a deep dive into the company that you won’t get from the standard tour. After the tasting, you’re set loose behind the bar — and when it’s all over you get to pick your favorite bottling to take with you on the road. Feel free to take it up to one of the three restaurants and enjoy it with your lunch — the Beef and Guinness Stew was one of the best I had during my time there.

Bottom line: Whether you like Guinness or not, don’t miss this experience.

Teeling Whiskey Company

Jack Teeling is an official Friend of Drinkhacker, and his distillery — the first to operate in Dublin since 1976 — just opened for visitors in May. Teeling Whiskey Company is still building out its tourist experience, but visitors are welcome to take a brief tour and taste some of the company’s products. At present, everything Teeling is bottling is sourced from other distilleries, but you can watch new-make spirit being produced now. Eventually this juice running from these stills will comprise the core of the Teeling product line.

We had a private tour with Jack and master distiller Alex Chasko, where we tasted Teeling’s standard lineup — widely available in every bar in Dublin — and some of its very rare limited edition releases. My hands-down favorite: The 26 Year Old Single Malt, which is finished in white burgundy casks for three years, an elegant whiskey that showcases the delicacy of Irish by infusing it with florals, gentle heather, and light citrus fruit notes. The fragrant, white flower finish almost makes you forget about the €450 price tag.

Also on hand at the tasting was one of the first bottlings of Teeling’s new Single Malt Single Cask offering. Seven different casks are being bottled — with different wood types and different age statements — and I managed to bring one home for a formal review. Stay tuned — and make sure you tell Teeling I sent you if you drop by.

Don’t miss the first part of this travelogue… Scotland!

Review: Innis & Gunn Rare Oak Pale Ale and Highland Ale

I&G Highland Ale Bottle with Box 660ml 2015 LO

It’s our second look at Scotland-based Innis & Gunn‘s beers, with two new oak-aged offerings (as all I&G beers are made) hitting the shelves now. The first is a seasonal brew, the second is a special edition that comes in a large-sized bottle and its own wooden carton.

Innis & Gunn Rare Oak Pale – Aged over Scottish oak, with the addition of elderflower and sweet gale (a medieval hops alternative) during the maturation. Sweet, but not aggressively so as in some Innis & Gunn bottlings, it offers distinctly floral and fruity notes — almost like juicy apple meets fresh violets. The vanilla-fueled oak plays out over all of that, with just the lightest touch of bitterness to even things out. 5.8% abv. B / $11 per four-pack

Innis & Gunn Highland Ale – This is an oversized, special edition brew, made from “Scotch Ale matured over oak chips infused with 18 Year Old Highland Scotch Whisky in Innis & Gunn’s patented Oakerators (think coffee percolator).” As with most Innis & Gunn bottlings, it’s very malty and quite sweet, pushy candylike notes with caramel sauce and cream soda notes. The whisky element comes through, a bit, on the somewhat racy nose and through a raisiny note on the body, but what this ale really needs is some bitterness to help cut through the sugar and add a little balance. 7.4% abv. B / $7 per 22 oz. bottle

innisandgunn.com

Review: Starr Hill King of Hop and Soul Shine (2015)

King of Hop 4pk_transIt’s time for one new, limited release — King of Hop — and the return of a seasonal — Soul Shine — to the Drinkhacker beer fridge. Let’s dig in…

Starr Hill King of Hop Imperial IPA – Not to be confused with the King of Pop, this is a classic, dry-hopped Imperial IPA with all the expected trimmings. Lovely citrus-pine notes up front, dusted with a touch of burnt marshmallow and notes of forest floor. Chewy and lightly resinous — but far from overpowering in the bitterness department — it’s a refreshing and well-crafted IPA with just a touch of uniqueness to carry things along. 7.5% abv. A- / $NA per four-pack

Starr Hill Soul Shine Belgian-Style Pale Ale (2015) – This “Americanized” Belgian ale grew on me a bit with this go-round, its late-game bitterness pairing a bit better with its heftier up-front maltiness and mushroomy, bready, slightly vegetal notes. 5.2% abv. B- / $10 per six-pack

starrhill.com

Review: Radeberger Pilsner, Clausthaler NA, and Schofferhofer Grapefruit

schofferhofer grapefruit

No fancy intro needed on this one. Here’s a collection of three semi-random beers from the U.S. distribution arm of Germany’s Radeberger Gruppe — including the company’s newly-available grapefruit-flavored hefeweizen and our first-ever review of a non-alcoholic beer! Can any of these be worthwhile? I smell a roundup brewing…

Radeberger Pilsner – Simple at first, Radeberger evolves its deep cereal and malt notes to reveal some surprising chocolate character, particularly on the back end. Slightly muddy, with some notes reminiscent of a brown ale, but not without ample charm. 4.8% abv. B / $9 per six-pack

Clausthaler Amber Non-Alcoholic – There’s no getting around the fact that this is a non-alcoholic beer (or, at less than 0.5% abv, almost non-alcoholic), but let’s try to look at this in the context of, say, a curiously-flavored soda. On that front, Clausthaler isn’t bad, offering a sort of malt-flavored sparkling water that offers the essence of beer without all the social problems. There’s not much to get excited about here, to be sure, but if you absolutely can’t drink — or can’t drink any more — I can think of worse things to put in your gullet. D+ / $8 per six-pack

Schofferhofer Grapefruit – Unfiltered wheat beer with grapefruit flavor (and cochineal color) added. It’s a super-fruity concoction not unlike a shandy or even a modern grapefruit-flavored malt beverage — with a bit of a vegetal tinge on the end. Not much in the way of “beer” flavor, but while the tart grapefruit character is quite sweet, it’s at least short of candylike. Harmless, and at 3.2% abv, I mean that in every sense of the word. B- / $7 per six-pack

radeberger.com

Review: Draftmark Beer Tap System

 

Lifestyle Images

Having beer on tap at home is a killer move, but kegerators are enormous, costly, and frankly, a bit frat-house juvenile. Draftmark has an answer: A mini keg that fits in your fridge.

The Draftmark system includes a battery-powered base and replaceable, one-gallon growlers that fit inside it. Just charge up the battery, install a plastic jug of one of the half-dozen beer varieties available (I chose Goose Island IPA), and you’ve got enough fresh draft for about ten 12 oz. servings. When it’s dry, pop it out, recharge the battery (which powers an air compressor that keeps the mini-keg pressurized), and you’re ready to go again.

The Draftmark system is a pretty cool idea, but I had one major issue with it: It was too big for my ’80s-era fridge. The only way I could get the door to shut was to put it in diagonally on the shelf, which pretty much ate up the entire thing. I expect more modern kitchens won’t have this problem, but for me it’s a deal killer that means I can’t use it regularly… at least until I commit to a second fridge for the garage. Also: Refills are cheap, but the selection is limited and — more importantly — tough to find, for now. (Pro tip: Look for free shipping deals.)

Otherwise, it’s a pretty cool idea, and the beer it pours (albeit slowly) does come out fresh and pub-worthy. (Make sure you give it plenty of time to chill down or you’ll end up with a ton of foam.) Those of you with those enormous Sub-Zeros and lots of space for novelties might clear out that Chinese takeout and give it a try.

B+ / $70 (1 gallon refills about $15) / draftmark.com [BUY IT NOW FROM AMAZON]

Review: Ecliptic/Wicked Weed/Stone Points Unknown IPA

pointsunknown_bottle_4webIt’s time for another three-way collaboration from Stone, bringing in Portland, Oregon’s Ecliptic Brewing and Asheville, North Carolina’s Wicked Weed. As if three breweries wasn’t tough enough to pull together, what Stone has done with Points Unknown is take two divergent beers and blend them together.

Three-quarters of the beer is a west coast-style double IPA. The other quarter is a Belgian tripel, barrel aged for four months in casks that first held red wine and then held tequila. It may say “IPA” on the label, but what’s inside is much more than that.

If this all sounds complicated, try tasting it. Both elements of the brew are well represented here, with the tripel starting things off with a malty, slightly spicy character featuring notes of cloves, coffee beans, and just a touch of sour cherry. The IPA element ultimately takes over, though, offering bracing bitterness, much more citrus-focused than it is piney. Some bitter root notes emerge with time, but it’s those sour cherries that stick with me the most. It’s a complicated — and not entirely cohesive — beer, but it’s easily worth a try while you can still nab it.

9.5% abv.

B+ / $9 per 22 oz. bottle / stonebrewing.com

Review: Newcastle Collaboration Edition British Pale Ale and Session IPA

Newcastle Best of Britain Variety Pack bottles

Newcastle is back and continuing its Collaboration Edition series of limited releases with two new brews made in collaboration with Edinburgh’s Caledonian Brewery — updates on the pale ale/IPA recipe.

Newcastle Collaboration Edition British Pale Ale – Had I not read the label I would have assumed this was a standard brown ale, quite malty and nutty, with a touch of baking chocolate on the back end. I get very little hops here — though it is dry hopped to 39 IBUs, according to Newcastle. B-

Newcastle Collaboration Edition British Session India Pale Ale – A slight pine element up front and a hint of bitterness (though it’s rated at 45 IBUs) doesn’t exactly make this into a real IPA. Newcastle’s signature chocolate maltiness is spread thick on this brew, which washes away the crispness and ultimately gives its citrus notes a bit of orange-flavored chocolate character. Just so-so. At 5.1% abv, it’s just barely below the 5.8% of the standard edition. B-

each about $8 per six-pack / newcastlebrown.com

Review: Deschutes Pinedrops, Foray, Twilight 2015, and The Stoic 2015

foray deschutes

We’ve been falling behind on Deschutes’ beer releases, so here’s a look at four new/seasonal/reissued bottlings hitting in time for summer sipping!

Deschutes Brewery Pinedrops IPA – Formerly an experimental brew served only on tap (and amde with Chinook, Centennial, and Equinox hops), this year Pinedrops goes into year-round rotation in bottles. A burly IPA with resin a plenty and ample, earthy undertones. More forest floor than canopy, there’s some mushroomy notes and a bit of stewed prune character to balance the gentler citrus peel and pine needle elements. A more brooding, less cleansing (but plenty bitter) expression of IPA. 6.5% abv. B+ / $10 (six-pack of 12 oz. bottles)

Deschutes Brewery Foray IPA – This new addition to the Deschutes Bond Street series of seasonals takes classic IPA hops (Nugget, Amarillo, Mosiac, CTZ, and Galaxy), and pairs them up with a Belgian yeast strain for the fermentation. The results: A bitter beer with more fruit, including some tart apple notes, some lemon, and slightly sour apricots. It’s a fun little change of pace from the usual pine and citrus focus, though not necessarily “better.” 6.5% abv. A- / $6 (22 oz. bottle)

Deschutes Brewery Twilight Summer Ale (2015) – This season’s Twilight offers a nice balance of piney bitterness and some dried citrus peel notes along with a little baked apple character. On the finish, notes of clove and nutmeg. It’s never been an overwhelmingly complex beer, but it’s a nice distraction from other blonde ales that are often a bit more biscuity. 5% abv. B+ / $10 (six-pack of 12 oz. bottles)

Deschutes Brewery The Stoic (2015) – Deschutes launched the original Stoic in 2011, and it generated a surprising backlash because drinkers felt it “didn’t taste like a Belgian Quad” — which the bear is styled after. Deschutes basically said it didn’t care and released a darker version called Not The Stoic in 20114. Now The Stoic is back with the original’s recipe, which balances Pilsner malt with Hallertauer Mittelfruh, Czech Saaz, and Northern Brewer hops plus Belgian candi sugars and pomegranate molasses. Pinot noir and rye whiskey barrels are used to gently age the finished beer. I don’t get much barrel influence here; instead the malt and molasses do most of the talking, giving this a very sweet approach and a powerful, juicy impact on the palate. The alcohol level (significant) isn’t readily noticeable, as the fruitier elements — figs, apricots, peaches, and a lacing of molasses — tend to mask it. The finish is clean but sticky with caramel notes making for a decadent — but a bit gooey — finish. 10.9% abv. B+ / $16 (22 oz. bottle)

deschutesbrewery.com