Category Archives: Beer

Review: BridgePort Brewing Trilogy 1 and Hop Czar Citra IPA

bridgeport trilogy 300x300 Review: BridgePort Brewing Trilogy 1 and Hop Czar Citra IPAPortland, Oregon-based BridgePort Brewing is celebrating 30 years in business, and it’s honoring the event by putting out three beers, all named “Trilogy something” over the course of the year ahead. Fans will vote on their favorite and the winner will be brought back in 2015.

The first of this trio is out now: Trilogy 1, which is dry-hopped with Oregon-grown Crystal hops. Review below.

We’re also doubling up this review with another look-see, of Bridgeport’s Hop Czar. Formerly a standard bottling, it too is becoming a series of subtly different beers with different hop varietals as the focus. The first release, nicknamed “Citra Czar,” uses (you guessed it) Citra hops in the mix.

Thoughts on both brews, now in limited release, follow.

BridgePort Brewing Trilogy 1 Crystal - A Crystal dry-hopped American pale ale. Solid stuff. Really fresh up front, with a minimal nose akin to a pilsner. The body is restrained on the bitterness, with some lemon peel and orange peel notes, plus a little nuttiness on the finish. A simple beer, unmuddied with distracting notes, but refreshing and well made. 5.2% abv. B+

BridgePort Brewing Hop Czar Citra - A Citra dry-hopped American pale ale. Lots of fruity citrus notes here, both on the fairly intense nose and the body. The strong fruit character is this close to being out of balance with the intense bitterness of the hops, and it’s the hops that win out in the end, leaving Hop Czar with a strong bitter finish. An unusual and satisfying IPA, but I think the Citra hops alone here aren’t enough to give the beer direction, balance, and a satisfying finish. 6.5% abv. B+

about $8 per six-pack / bridgeportbrew.com

Review: 4 Beers from Base Camp Brewing

base camp Smore Stout Bottle small Review: 4 Beers from Base Camp BrewingLike any good craft brewer, Portland, Oregon-based Base Camp makes a dozen-plus different beers, some with very exotic compositions. Unlike most craft brewers, it then puts these beers into oversized 22 oz. aluminum bottles, which are “made for adventure.”

We tested four of the company’s brews. Thoughts follow. 

Base Camp Brewing In-Tents IPL – An unusual copper-colored India Pale Lager. Deep forest notes and cedar closet on the nose. The body is equal parts IPA and malty lager, but the earthy, almost musty finish that develops (thanks to the beer being aged in oak barrels) is a bit too much, overpowering some of the delicate pine notes up front. 6.8% abv. B

Base Camp Brewing Ripstop Rye Pils – A German pilsner with the addition of rye malt. This is a beautiful combination, the pilsner lush and rounded, and the rye giving it a bit of extra zip. Straightforward with fresh baked bread notes, moderate bitterness, and with just a touch of orange peel on the finish. Lovely balance. Easy, summery brew. 5.7% abv. A-

Base Camp Brewing Northwest Fest – An Oktoberfest-style brew, moderately gold in color and quite malt-forward. Quite a good one, it’s been lagered on toasted oak to give it a touch of vanilla sweetness, but the mildly dry hoppiness and fresh baked bread notes overpower everything else in the end. Straigthtforward, it’s a richer, more mouth-filling choice than both of the above. 5.6% abv. B+

Base Camp Brewing S’More Stout – An American stout with all the trimmings: Chocolate, coffee, and intense malt extract on the nose and the body, leading into a thick, bittersweet finish (emphasis on the bitter). Not enough nuance in this one for me… just a punishing blackness punctuated by hints of dessert. 7.7% abv. B-

basecampbrewingco.com

Homebrew Review: Northern Brewer – BACON! Smoked Red Ale

Stock Homebrew Review: Northern Brewer   BACON! Smoked Red Ale

Bacon doughnuts, bacon gum, bacon mints, and now… bacon beer? One of the hottest crazes to sweep the nation lately has been bacon-flavored products, and not even beer seems to be able to escape its allure. In 2011, Oregon-based Rogue Ales teamed up with Voodoo Doughnut to release its Bacon Maple Ale, but now homebrewers can join in on the swine-inspired fun. (Which I did, for your reading pleasure.)

Northern Brewer’s BACON! Smoked Red Ale homebrew kit is available in both extract and all-grain varieties, featuring cherrywood smoked malt to cement the smoky, meaty character. However, what sets the Northern Brewer kit apart from crowd is the inclusion of liquid bacon extract. At first glance, this vial is intimidating; it appears thick, smells of a combination of brine and bacon, and doesn’t shy away from potency. Keep in mind, though, that this 30ml of extract is enough for 5 gallons of beer.

Bacon 3 Homebrew Review: Northern Brewer   BACON! Smoked Red Ale

Out of the box, the extract version of the kit contains specialty grains (chocolate malt, honey malt, Caramunich, and the aforementioned cherrywood smoked malt), dry malt extract (amber and wheat), dark malt syrup, an ounce of Willamette hops, 30ml of bacon extract, and your choice of dry or liquid yeast.

While steeping the specialty grains and during the boil, a strong smoke and barbecue aroma fills the air as the cherrywood malt works its magic. When I added the bacon extract after the boil, I could sense how meaty this beer was going to turn out.

Bacon 2 525x350 Homebrew Review: Northern Brewer   BACON! Smoked Red Ale

Disclaimer: Each homebrewer has different equipment, technique, and experience. Your results may vary.

Despite the aggressive pork notes that emerge while brewing the beer, BACON! cleans up nicely within the glass after a few weeks of conditioning in bottles. While Northern Brewer’s stock photo shows a radiant ruby color, my version was a little bit darker, bordering on mahogany. In the nose, the bacon still stands in the spotlight but isn’t overpowering. In fact, there’s a pleasant balance between the meatiness and a honey, caramel sweetness. This balance continues into the body, where a mild amount of chocolate contributes to the complexity.

Overall, my version of this beer had a bold but not overwhelming bacon characteristic; I went back and forth on questioning if I would’ve liked to see a more brash beer — without compromising the drinkability of how it is now. All told, I enjoyed what I ended up with and will probably explore this kit again in the future.

B / $50 (extract version) / northernbrewer.com

Review: Alaskan Brewing Co. Hopothermia and ESB

alaska Hopothermia 106x300 Review: Alaskan Brewing Co. Hopothermia and ESBAlaskan Brewing Co., arguably Alaska’s most noteworthy brewery, is releasing these two beers this spring — with Hopothermia now joining the ranks as a year-round release. Bold, bitter, and hoppy, they’re both worthy sippers no matter what the weather is like.

Alaskan Brewing Co. Hopothermia Double IPA – A stellar IPA, a little citrus, a little piney — particularly on the finish, when the evergreen notes really start to show. Big and bright and loaded with hops, this one’s a rich and delicious dazzler. 8.5% abv. A / $NA per 12 oz. bottle

Alaskan Brewing Co. ESB Extra Special Bitter Ale – This amber ale offers bracing bitterness without being overly hoppy. Dark chocolate and mild coffee notes dominate the body, while the bitter finish cleans up any lingering savory components, leaving a chewy and almost woody character behind. 5.3% abv. A- / $NA per 22 oz. bottle

alaskanbeer.com

Review: Deschutes Brewery Hop Henge Experimental IPA (2014)

deschutes Hop Henge 22oz 76x300 Review: Deschutes Brewery Hop Henge Experimental IPA (2014)This year’s Hop Henge from Bend, Oregon-based Deschutes continues the company’s long-running experiment in “IBU escalation,” landing at 99 IBUs this time around. It doesn’t taste all that bitter. Sure, it’s got a nice slug of hops courtesy of the Cascade, Centennial, Millennium, Chinook, and one experimental variety of hops in the mix, which give it a bracing dried herb character. But it’s a curious chocolate — very dark and brooding — that turns this into something more than your usual IPA. The finish is drying and slightly fruity, with caramel apple notes.

Hop Henge has never been my favorite Deschutes bottling, but as always it proves itself to be worthy of exploration.

8.8% abv.

B / $6 per 22 oz. bottle / deschutesbrewery.com

Review: Hangar 24 Barrel Roll No. 03 Pugacehev’s Cobra

hangar 24 barrel roll Pagachevs cobra 265x300 Review: Hangar 24 Barrel Roll No. 03 Pugacehevs CobraA Russian Imperial Stout brewed with maple syrup and aged in bourbon barrels for eight months, Hangar 24′s latest barrel-aged brew is indeed, as promised, “an assault on your senses.”

They mean that in a good way, but at first, Pugachev’s Cobra, now in its third release (it comes out every December), is a little jarring. Of course, at 13.8% alcohol, a beer will do that to you.

Give it time to settle down a bit and this Barrel Roll bottling becomes quite the charmer. Smooth coffee notes (not ultra-bitter), rounded out by just a touch of that maple flavor, give this a delightful dessert-like feeling at the start. Cocoa notes come along in short order, as the malty core starts to build. On the finish, it’s fruitier than you’d think, with notes of raisin, plum, and blackberry, all shrouded in vanilla syrup driven by the bourbon barrel (and that monumental body).

This isn’t a beer you’re going to crack open and guzzle, but by the fireside — which is where I’m enjoying it — it’s quite a little delight.

A- / $20 per 750ml bottle / hangar24brewery.com

Review: Rekorderlig Swedish Hard Ciders

rekorderlig 3 Bottle Lock up USA Blended 525x525 Review: Rekorderlig Swedish Hard Ciders

Rekorderlig, Sweden’s hard cider, is available in myriad flavors, all clocking in at a low 4.5% abv alcohol level. Rekorderlig, popular in Europe and just now making its way to the States, isn’t made just for sipping straight. The creator also wants you to try it out in cocktails. A suggested recipe appears below. Meanwhile, we tried out the three varieties now available in the U.S.; thoughts follow.

Rekorderlig Premium Pear Hard Cider – Very sweet, with a long finish. The distinct taste of pears, bathed in a sort of vanilla cream, is especially heavy up front. As the cider fades it leaves behind a fizzy, more vaguely citrus finish. Refreshing, but the sweetness makes it a bit cloying. 

Rekorderlig Premium Strawberry-Lime Hard Cider – Very strawberry soda-like, with a little less sweetness and a bit less fizz than the Pear expression. The strawberry character is candylike, but in a tasteful way. The finish is actually more reminiscent of  real strawberries than candy. Fragrant and fun. B+

Rekorderlig Premium Wild Berries Hard Cider – Predominantly raspberry on the tongue, with more of a club soda-style foaminess that tends to mute the fruit. This is the least sweet but also the least flavorful of the bunch. B-

Recipe: Winter Fire
250ml Rekorderlig Pear
5-6 thin slices of ginger
20ml lime juice
30ml honey water (3 parts honey 1 part hot water) or squeeze tube honey
3 dashes Angostura bitters

Heat it up and serve, keep the ginger floating in the glass.

about $5 per 500ml bottle / rekorderlig.com

Review: Deschutes Brewery The Abyss Aged Stout 2013 Edition

deschutes the Abyss 2013 Label 525x460 Review: Deschutes Brewery The Abyss Aged Stout 2013 Edition

It’s been three years since we tucked into a bottle of Bend, Oregon-based Deschutes Brewery’s rare barrel-aged concoction. Time again then for a fresh look at this bold annual release, The Abyss, now in its 8th installment.

Sadly, I’m still two months before the 8/16/14 “drink after” date on this beer… but by that point, this will all be off the market, and you won’t be able to buy it.

This Imperial stout is brewed with black strap molasses, licorice, cherry bark and vanilla. 6% of the beer is aged in oak ex-bourbon barrels, 11% in oak ex-pinot noir barrels, and another 11% in new oak barrels. It all comes together in glorious fashion; I think this is one of the best Abyss bottlings I’ve tried to date.

On the nose, the coffee-brown brew offers beautiful licorice notes up front, with aromas of coffee bean and cocoa powder backing it up. The body is intense with dark coffee character, ultra-bitter chocolate, and a panoply of mild vegetal notes that include green bean and that olive character that’s a classic part of The Abyss’s finish. The denouement is like sipping on the last of a truly great espresso.

Great stuff, hard to put down.

11% abv. 70 IBUs.

2013 Edition: A / $12 per 22-oz. bottle / deschutesbrewery.com

Review: Samuel Adams Cold Snap

Sam Adams Cold Snap 120z BOTTLE 79x300 Review: Samuel Adams Cold SnapFor the upcoming spring season, Sam Adams has bottled this experimental brew, originally rolled out at beer fests last October. It’s an unfiltered white ale, a golden wheat blended with ten fruits, flowers, and spices, including grains of paradise, anise, hibiscus, and orange peel. Tasting notes follow.

Cold Snap pours, as expected, a cloudy gold in color. It’s surprisingly woody and a bit piney on the nose, with big cereal notes underneath. Intensely musky, these characteristics — nothing I’d call fruity — obscure any hop character at least at first. On the palate, some lemony fruitiness manages to push through the earth tones, bringing on a malty mid-palate before a kind of tree bark character takes over on the finish. Altogether this beer is a bit muddy, though mega fans of wheat beers may find it more to their liking. I tried both the canned and bottled versions and felt the bottled version was a bit fresher.

5.3% abv.

C+ / $9 per six-pack / samueladams.com

Review: Magic Hat G-Thing and Heart of Darkness

magic hat gthing 106x300 Review: Magic Hat G Thing and Heart of DarknessTwo new/seasonal brews from Magic Hat, both with winter on the mind…

Magic Hat G-Thing – A ginger spice ale that’s light on the ginger, balanced with a solid ale backbone and touched with just a bit of spice (ginger and cinnamon). Mind you, it’s more ginger than gingerbread — the spicy addition offers ginger’s characteristic bite, not the more sweet-and-savory character you get with a baking cabinet full of gingerbread spices. Additives aside, the beer offers caramel, toasted bread, and light coffee notes, with a modestly bitter finish. Nods at the holidays without overdoing it. 5.7% abv. B+ / $NA

Magic Hat Heart of Darkness – A winter-themed English stout. Black as night, with relatively traditional character for the style. The nose is coffee-inflected, with some cocoa powder behind it. The body has more of the same, with some woody tannic notes underneath. Hard-edged and bitter on the finish. Nothing much new in the stout world here, but it’s representative of the style — neither breaking new ground or messing up a well-trod formula. 5.7% abv. B / $NA

magichat.net

Review: Lake Champlain Milk Chocolate Apple Cider Caramels

lake champlain happy valley orchard citizen cider caramels 300x257 Review: Lake Champlain Milk Chocolate Apple Cider CaramelsWhiskey chocolates? Been done. How about chocolates studded with caramel and apple cider?

Lake Champlain Chocolates’ latest concoction brings in apples from Happy Valley Orchard and cider from Citizen Cider to create an all-Vermont seasonal confection sensation.

These dense caramels start with silky milk chocolate and burst open to reveal intense apple pie flavor inside, rich with cinnamon/allspice notes and fresh apple puree. If anything’s missing it’s the “cider” element — though it seems impossible to get the real essence of tart, fresh cider into a package this small.

Delicious stuff, though perhaps a bit pricey….

A- / $15 per sleeve of 7 caramels (2.4 oz. total) / lakechamplainchocolates.com

Review: Mission Brewery El Conquistador and Shipwrecked Beers

mission shipwrecked 300x282 Review: Mission Brewery El Conquistador and Shipwrecked BeersForget your 25.4-ounce Foster’s “oil can.” San Diego-based Mission Brewery is putting its craft brew into 32 oz. “cannons,” enough for two full pints of suds. So grab a friend, because you’ll need ‘em to polish off a full quarter gallon of beer.

Of course, Mission also does beer in bottles and kegs, but these monsters are coming to two of its popular offerings. We tasted them — as poured from the can into our own glassware — and offer thoughts below.

Mission Brewery El Conquistador Extra Pale Ale - A mild gold pale ale. Initially quite hoppy and bitter, this settles down to reveal a more classic, piney pale ale profile. There’s more malt in the middle than most beers of this style exhibit, with a kind of chewy, coconut-husk bitterness on the back end. Ultimately a relatively easy, and surprisingly sessionable IPA. 4.8% abv. B+ / $7 (32 oz. can)

Mission Brewery Shipwrecked Double IPA – Shipwrecked is a bruiser, a monster of a beer with lots of malt, lots of hops, and some citrus thrown in. And alcohol, nearly 10% by volume, so thick you can taste it from the start. This is a big beer that demands quiet attention, offering power and balance while coming in a little short on nuance. Start a fire and pour a glass… and don’t think about trying to drink this whole thing alone. 9.25% abv. B+ / $8 (32 oz. can)

missionbrewery.com

Review: Shock Top Ghost Pepper Wheat Experimental Beer

Earlier this year, Shock Top didn’t release its experimental Campfire Wheat Beer, a balls-out brew meant to taste like s’mores. Like Campfire, Ghost Pepper Wheat is destined for service at beer festivals only, so you’ll have to keep tabs on Shock Top’s website or Facebook page to figure out where it can be found.

Fortunately, unlike Campfire, Ghost Pepper Wheat is a far more successful (if less ambitious) experiment. An unfiltered wheat beer brewed with ghost pepper chiles — the hottest chile pepper in the world — plus a touch of blue agave and citrus peel, it’s a bit of a spin on tradition, combining the cereal notes of a wheat beer with the crispness of a Mexican lager.

The inclusion of the ghost pepper is of course the unique part of the draw here, and unlike many pepper-infused beers, Ghost Pepper Wheat doesn’t overplay this aspect of the beer. In fact, the spiciness is just barely present — just a hint on the tongue and the cheeks, so little that there can’t be more than a few drops of ghost pepper extract in an entire batch of this beer. In fact, it’s so mild that it’s one of the few times I’ve encountered a spicy beer (generally a bad idea in my book) where I actually thought it could use more heat.

Aside from the spiciness (or lack thereof), the beer is worthwhile. The citrus peel element is noticeable, but not overdone, giving the wheat beer base a little balance. Could you get the same effect by dropping a squeeze of orange and a dash of Tabasco into your standard grade Shock Top? Probably, but where’s the fun in that?

5.2% abv.

B+ / not for sale / shocktopbeer.com

Review: Newcastle Cabbie Black Ale

Newcastle Cabbie bottle 100x300 Review: Newcastle Cabbie Black AleThis latest release in Newcastle’s limited edition series is definitively its best, a black ale called Cabbie. Seductively dark, the brew is surprisingly mellow, with chocolatey malt notes and a nutty finish. Think coffee — but freshly picked berries, not dark roast. Cabbie’s got enough bitterness (just 25 IBUs) to keep it mouth-cleansing, but has a big enough body to keep things interesting, rumbling, and fireside-friendly.

Watch for point of sale displays that feature a $5 credit toward Taxi Magic cab fares. Not a bad deal!

4.2% abv.

A- / $8 per six-pack / newcastlebrown.com

Review: Guinness Red Harvest Stout

guinness rhs 144x300 Review: Guinness Red Harvest StoutNot quite a red ale and not quite a stout, the seasonal Guinness Red Harvest Stout looks far more enticing than it tastes. The reddish-coffee brown beer pours with a thick, Old World head, but from the start something is off. The nose is weak, with light roasted grain notes atop thin malt. The body fares worse, watery (canned at just 4.1% abv) and vegetal at times, with wispy malt and notes of decidedly weak coffee. This is a beer that looks like it’ll be a great fireside brew but drinks like a dull and watery mainstream beer. An unfortunate misfire.

C- / $8.50 per four-pack of 14.9-oz. nitrogenated cans / guinness.com

Review: Stone Brewing Arrogant Bastard Double Bastard Ale

double bastard ale 226x300 Review: Stone Brewing Arrogant Bastard Double Bastard AleAs the back label copy of this brew states, “this is one lacerative mother of a beer,” and that’s not far from the truth. The burly American Ale begins with loads of malt and plenty of citrus backing it up. Breathe deep for some evergreen character, too.

On the palate, it’s loaded with malty baked bread, intense citrus oil, some leather and tar, and touches of Skor bar (chocolate + toffee). The finish reminds you how much alcohol there is here, yet it’s not heavy or stifling like many overproof brews. Rather, the clean finish keeps things level and interesting, the malt and chocolate taking things to an almost dessert-like level in the back of your throat… Hard to put down.

11.2% abv.

A- / $5 per 22 oz. bottle / arrogantbastard.com

Review: The Ancient Ales of Dogfish Head

“Not to know what happened before you were born is to be a child forever. For what is the time of a man, except it be interwoven with that memory of ancient things of a superior age?” – Cicero

Thankfully, there are modern day custodians of history keeping the past alive and well, presenting long-silenced voices in time and framing the act of rediscovery as an innovative art. Such is the case with magazines like Lapham’s Quarterly, podcasts like Hard Core History, and Dogfish Head’s Ancient Ales series.

Working in collaboration with the University of Pennsylvania’s Director of Biomolecular Archaeology for Cuisine, Fermented Beverages and Health Dr. Patrick McGovern, Dogfish CEO Sam Calagione revives long lost recipes and brings to light traditional beermaking methods that folks in the United States would consider highly exotic (you can see their discovery and process in action on their reality show Brewmasters, now streaming on Netflix). More often than not though, the efforts pay off.

jiahu Review: The Ancient Ales of Dogfish HeadChateau Jiahu – A variation on the world’s oldest fermented beverage recipe, this is an incredibly sweet beer made with hawthorn fruit, sake, barley, rice and honey. The majority of these ingredients are more than evident throughout the experience. Took a bit to get used to, but once invested, I thoroughly enjoyed it. 10% abv. A- / $12 (25.4 oz.)

Midas Touch – “Indiana Calagione” and Dr. McGovern found the molecular evidence of this recipe in a Turkish tomb that was allegedly the property of one King Midas. Incredibly sweet, and as the story goes it’s actually somewhere on the scale between a wine and mead. I’m inclined to believe it. Leaves a bit of a dry finish with a few faint herb notes. 9% abv. B / $12 (12 oz. four-pack)

theobroma Review: The Ancient Ales of Dogfish HeadTheobroma – Wham bam, thank you ma’am! Taking its recipe cues from a chemical analysis of Honduran pottery over 3,000 years old (it feels kind of ridiculous just typing that), this is a chocolate beer recipe filled to the brim with cocoa, a bit of bitter honey, and a bit of chili spice on the back end. The deceptive light coloring (you’d think a chocolate beer would be a bit darker) teases and lets the chili and cocoa do their dance. Excellent stuff! 9% abv. A / $12 (25.4 oz)

Ta Henket – Bread bread and bread… which makes perfect sense because this recipe comes from Egyptian Hieroglyphics. The yeast stands out with traces of the chamomile and other herbs listed as secondary ingredients. Probably my least favorite of the bunch, but being the weak link in this chain could be the strongest on any other lineup. 4.5% abv. B- / $11 (25.4 oz)

The company also offers a variety of special brewpub only editions, including one involving a whole mess of human-masticated corn and saliva. Hopefully these other experiments will see mass production shortly, but given the time and effort it takes to make them happen, it may just require a visit to Delaware instead.

Dogfish Head has a tendency to sometimes enter the realm of the comically absurd. In keeping with the spirit of the company’s mantra, that’s a risk that unconventional brewing must take in order to stay innovative and interesting. For this series it’s an investment that pays off handsomely and provides an enjoyable education into the complexity of beer history for those willing to pay the cost of admission.

dogfish.com

Review: Samuel Adams Utopias (2013 Release)

sam adams utopias 2013 525x525 Review: Samuel Adams Utopias (2013 Release)

Sam Adams continues its annual release of Utopias, a barrel-aged, mega-alcohol, highly expensive brew that stands as one of America’s longest-running “extreme beers” (and which is made without the freeze-and-skim technique that most other high-booze beermakers rely on.

For 2013, Utopias has been “blended with Samuel Adams Kosmic Mother Funk (KMF), a Belgian-style ale barrel-aged for at least nine months (and up to two years) in Hungarian oak tuns,” per the company. This is a big shift for Utopias, and one which is supposed to bring a whole new dimension to the mega-beer. The beer is partly aged in ex-Bourbon barrels, and partly aged in ex-Port casks. It borrows a bit from prior releases, as well as pulling off some new tricks.

Utopias 2013 immediately offers a sweet, maple syrup nose when it’s poured, but this quickly fades, revealing a more brooding, savory character beneath. After a few minutes in a snifter, Utopias 2013 gives off aromas of chestnuts, coffee grounds, and very dark chocolate. The lattermost of these is most prominent in the body, which features a pruny, stewed-fruit character that is much deeper, and more bittersweet than prior versions of this beer. The nose is more Port-like, but the body is all leather and bitter spice, turning almost astringent at times. I do like the added complexity, but the whole affair ultimately starts to fall out of balance, particularly on the mouth-puckering finish.

28% abv. 15,000 bottles made. Also can be paired with a special Utopias-seasoned cigar (which I didn’t review), purportedly the first craft beer-infused cigar ever made ($13).

B- / $199 / samueladams.com

Review: Hangar 24 Hullabaloo Winter Beer

hangar 24 winter beer hullabaloo 300x234 Review: Hangar 24 Hullabaloo Winter BeerOktoberfest is gone, winter brews are new arriving.

One of the first to hit is Redlands, Calif.-based Hangar 24′s Hullabaloo, a Scottish style ale made with European and American malts. It’s a rich and burly brew, driven by thick malt, coffee and cocoa powder notes, and bitter root notes. The overall impact: Relatively muted and restrained. Toasty and slightly smoky, it recalls more the fireside of the hearth than the Christmas tree proper, but seems fitting enough for winter celebrations… or casual imbibing.

6.5% abv.

B / $8 per four-pack / hangar24brewery.com

2013 Pumpkin Ale Roundup

in bottle with pumpkins 200x300 2013 Pumpkin Ale RoundupAh, Halloween approaches, and that means pumpkin-based beers are hitting the shelves en masse. We’ve had a fridge-load show up at Drinkhacker HQ in recent weeks, which can mean only one thing: Roundup Time!

Here are some thoughts on three new, and wildly different, pumpkin brews.

Hermitage Brewing Company Fruit Crate Pumpkin Ale – A standard pumpkin ale brewed with no additional spices, just organic pumpkins. Strong malt on the nose, big body, moderately bitter on the palate. There’s a very minor baking spice component driven by the gourd itself, and present mostly on the back end. But as for pumpkins? I don’t really get them at all in this weighty, wintry brew. 9% abv. B / $4 (16.9 oz)

Dogfish Head Punkin Ale – Brown ale brewed with pumpkin, brown sugar, allspice, cinnamon, and nutmeg. Those looking for a more festive brew — where the spicy components are more at the forefront — will enjoy this one. The cinnamon sugar notes are pronounced, particularly on first pour. The sweet stuff works well with the modestly malty body, and the hops on the finish offer a respite from the sugar. 7% abv. A- / $3 (12 oz.)

Hangar 24 Local Fields Gourdgeous – Imperial porter brewed with pumpkins, molasses, and spices. Very dark color, quite exotic on the nose. The molasses makes itself known right away, heavy and dense on the nose. Beneath that, ample nutmeg and allspice notes… more clove-oriented than the Dogfish Head. A somewhat dense beer, it takes things to a curiously chocolaty place in the finish… but leaves the pumpkin behind along the way. 8.5% abv. B+ / $8.50 (22 oz.)