Author Archives: Christopher Null

Review: Auchentoshan American Oak Single Malt Whisky

auchentoshan American Oak Bottle + Carton 525x702 Review: Auchentoshan American Oak Single Malt Whisky

The newest addition to Auchentoshan’s Lowland whisky collection is this expression, matured exclusively in ex-Bourbon American Oak, without finishing. Famed for its triple distillation process, Auchentoshan bottles this expression without an age statement.

The nose is indistinct and a bit on the grainy side, touched with light sawdust/wood notes. On the palate, I’m immediately reminded of Bourbon, with vanilla and chewy wood up front. This settles down quickly as the malt notes rapidly emerge: breakfast cereal, sesame seed, seaweed and salt, a touch of chicory, and — curiously — a bit of orange peel, which is weird considering this is not a sherried whisky.

Overall it drinks like the clearly young whisky that it is. But I can’t fault Auchentoshan for the move, and considering the budget pricing the distillery has set for it, it’s hard to fault its marketing either.

80 proof.

B / $35 / auchentoshan.com

Review: Rougaroux Rum Complete Lineup

Rougaroux Praline 394x1200 Review: Rougaroux Rum Complete Lineup

Thibodaux, Louisiana is home to Donner-Peltier Distillers, which is in turn home to the Rougaroux collection, as well as a number of other spirits (all of which we’ll be reviewing in due course). Up first is this trio of rums, which offer a distinctly Cajun perspective on this venerable spirit. Plastic beads not included. Read on for more.

Rougaroux Sugarshine Rum – A “rum moonshine,” this overproof, white spirit is made from local sugar cane. The nose is funky and fuel-like, more white whiskey than any white rum you’re likely to be familiar with. Things settle down on the tongue, fortunately, revealing some simple sugar notes. At this proof level, though, that sweetness is laced with an overpowering level of raw alcohol, providing a flood of hospital notes that the “sugarshine” can barely hold a candle to. 101 proof. B- / $21

Rougaroux Full Moon Dark Rum – Blackstrap molasses and raw sugar cane are used to make a white rum, which is aged in white oak barrels for an unstated amount of time. No caramel color or other agent is added. The results are curious. Rougaroux’s petrol character doesn’t slip away here. It’s big on the nose, pushing all but the faintest hint of molasses out of the picture. The body has plenty more of those fuel notes to go around, though they’re rounded out by some brown sugar character, vanilla, and sugary breakfast cereal notes. Tough on the back end — my hunch is that this has seen some time in new oak barrels (not used whiskey barrels), which would explain the very dark color, and that raw lumber has simply had its way with this spirit. 80 proof. B / $21

Rougaroux 13 Pennies Praline Rum – I love pralines. (I’m Texan, so it’s long A.) It would be un-American not to enjoy a good pecan-and-sugar confection from time to time. What then to make of 13 Pennies “Praline” rum? The NOLA staple isn’t at all detectable here. Though it is made with local pecans and Louisiana’s famous cane syrup, the nose is more akin to almonds or Amaretto. Presumably that’s due to the rum base interfering with the flavoring  ingredients. The attack is a bit vague and, again, grainy, with a nuttiness — again, more almond than pecan — coming to bear as the finish starts to build. Said finish is only moderate in its sweetness, that nutty character building to head before fading into a vague astringency. 80 proof. B- / $21

dpdspirits.com

Review: Wines of Edna Valley Vineyard, 2014 Releases

Edna Valley Vyd 2013 Central Coast Sauv Blanc 750ml New 75x300 Review: Wines of Edna Valley Vineyard, 2014 ReleasesLocated on the outskirts of San Luis Obispo, California, Edna Valley Vineyard (not “Vineyards”) is a budget producer of California’s most popular varietals. With its 2014 releases now hitting the market — 2012 vintage reds, 2013 vintage whites — here’s a look at three of the winery’s Central Coast-designated bottlings. All drink at levels considerably above their incredibly affordable price points.

2013 Edna Valley Vineyard Sauvignon Blanc Central Coast – Brisk pineapple quickly fades into intense acidity, with notes of intense lemon juice and pepe du chat. Stylistically basic, but made with competence. B / $15

2012 Edna Valley Vineyard Pinot Noir Central Coast – Gentle and quiet, as expected from a value Pinot. Light notes of blackberry, tea, and black pepper create a surprisingly balanced finished product, with a quite dry finish. B+ / $16

2012 Edna Valley Vineyard Cabernet Sauvignon Central Coast – As with the Pinot, this affordable Cab is gentle and dialed back, offering notes of blueberry, balsamic, currants, and more black tea. Very simple, lightly sweet finish, it’s jammier and juicier than the Pinot, but just as easygoing. B+ / $20

ednavalleyvineyard.com

Review: 7 Beers from North Coast Brewing Co.

north coast Pranqster.750ml 90x300 Review: 7 Beers from North Coast Brewing Co.Fort Bragg, California-based North Coast Brewing Co. isn’t your typical Cali brewer. Its focus on fruitier, malt-heavy, European-style ales is a far cry from the traditional west coast style IPAs that dominate its region. It’s particuarly ironic since North Coast is actually situated directly on the coast of the Pacific Ocean. You don’t get much more “west coast” than that.

North Coast makes a plethora of brews. We turn our attention to a lineup of seven — all of which are available in 12 oz. bottles instead of just 22 oz. bombers, so typical for high-abv rarities like some of these listed below.  (750ml bottlings of many of the higher-end beers are also available… like the one pictured here.)

Thoughts, as always, follow.

North Coast Old Stock Ale 2014 – An old ale made in the English style, with all-imported, English ingredients. Starts off fresh and fizzy, then the chocolate, coffee, and toffee notes come rushing at you like a freight train. The beer quickly turns into a burly, brooding monster with moderate sweetness and an epic finish that knocks you down with its notes of wine, figs, and intense malt character. Could use a touch more bitterness (or maybe some time in the cellar) to balance all of the above out. Ageable. 11.8% abv. B+ / $14 per 4-pack

North Coast Brother Thelonious Belgian Style Abbey Ale – A Belgian strong dark ale, this is a chewy, malty brew that brings a lot of fruit to the forefront. Raisins, figs, and plums are all amply represented here, with a dense, almost chocolate-driven core. Minimally hopped. The various components come together after a time — let it warm up a tad — creating a surprisingly harmonious whole. This drinks a bit more cohesively and less aggressively than the Old Stock Ale (at least without it seeing considerable cellar time). Ultimately it proves surprisingly silky and pleasant. 9.4% abv. A- / $12 per 4-pack

North Coast Le Merle Saison Belgian Style Farmhouse Ale – Slightly sour, this fruity saison offers notes of cherries and rhubarb, balanced with some yeast character. Dark caramel and coffee notes emerge on the finish, punching down some of this beer’s initial fruit notes. The overall impact is a little muddy, but compelling enough for enjoying on a hot day. 7.9% abv. B+ / $12 per 4-pack

North Coast Pranqster Belgian Style Golden Ale – Another strong Belgian ale, but not a dark ale — a pale ale. Initially a bit sour, this beer settles down with a strong granary character plus mild notes of apricots and peaches. A more modest dosage of hops give Pranqster a better balance than Brother Thelonious without requiring any aging time at all. Ultimately, the silky mix of bitter hops, chewy malt, and seductive fruit is a winner. 7.6% abv. A- / $10 per 4-pack

North Coast Scrimshaw – Even North Coast’s pilsner is burly and malty, a chewy, grain-heavy brew that is rounded and mouth-filling. Light citrus notes give it some complexity, but on the whole it’s a relatively simple brew with an Old World backbone. 4.4% abv. B+ / $8 per 6-pack

North Coast Blue Star Wheat Beer – A pale wheat ale, this Americanized hefeweizen drinks crisp and clean, lightly grainy (probably the least grain-forward of all the beers reviewed here) with a touch of juicy lemon and a hint of pine needles to it. As it warms, the wheat becomes more prominent, which makes things even simpler — which isn’t necessarily a bad thing. 4.5% abv. B+ / $8 per 6-pack

North Coast Old No. 38 Stout –  As stouts go, this rendition is dry and restrained, hoppier than most while nodding only gently toward those Old World notes of coffee and chocolate that are traditionally part and parcel of this category. No. 38 starts off with a gentle bitterness before fading into a sort of sweet-and-sour character that is only modestly dusted with notes of hot cocoa (er, cold cocoa), walnuts, and some lighter vegetable notes. A very pleasing and more easy-drinking (vs. dark and brooding) rendition of stout. 5.4% abv. B+ / $9 per 6-pack

northcoastbrewing.com

Review: The Balvenie Single Barrel Sherry Cask 15 Years Old

balvenie sherry cask single barrel Review: The Balvenie Single Barrel Sherry Cask 15 Years Old

The latest release from Balvenie is this 15 year old expression which has spent its entire life in former sherry casks. It is also a rare single cask release (Balvenie is the only distillery that has an ongoing single cask release of a single age as a part of its range), so you’ll find variation from bottle to bottle. How much variation? We were lucky enough to try this spirit drawn from two different casks — adjacent ones, in fact. The results might surprise you. Read on.

All bottles are 95.6 proof.

The Balvenie Single Barrel Sherry Cask 15 Years Old Cask #4450 – Great balance on this, with supple notes of cinnamon-raisin oatmeal mixing with vibrant citrus notes. The body amps that up further, lending butterscotch and flamed orange peel notes to an already rich and vibrant whisky. This whisky is firing on all cylinders, and as it continues to open up it starts to show gentle smoke notes, a touch of iodine, and a return of roasted grain character (think really good pretzels). The sherry’s what sticks with you the most, however, hanging on for an epic finish. A

The Balvenie Single Barrel Sherry Cask 15 Years Old Cask #4451 – A surprising degree of grain character here, infused with nougat and bitter orange peel. This doesn’t feel like a whisky that’s spent a full 15 years in sherry casks, the wood having more of an impact than you’d expect. The finish is drying, with emerging notes of seaweed and iodine, hemp twine and dusky roots. Interesting but flat, a whisky where the fruit is pulled back a bit too far for a whisky that wears its sherry cask heritage on its sleeve. B

$100 / thebalvenie.com  [BUY IT NOW FROM CASKERS]

Review: Guinness Blonde American Lager

GUINNESS Blonde American Lager Bottle Shot 0 395x1200 Review: Guinness Blonde American Lager

Bar the doors and shutter the windows. Hell’s freezing over and it’s starting with the world of beer, of all places.

What happened? Guinness, the mother of all black-as-night stouts, is releasing a standard, pale, American lager.

Made in Latrobe, Pennsylvania(!), Guinness uses American Mosaic, Willamette, and Mount Hood hops plus its Dublin-born Guinness yeast to create Guinness Blonde, a chewy blonde lager that’s unlike anything else the company has ever produced. (That said, this is the first volley in the new “Guinness Discovery Series,” so it’s possible a cranberry lambic is coming up next.)

As for the beer, it is awfully good. Thick and rich, this malty brew drinks like a Czech style pilsner, with a core of buttery biscuits and a very mild nuttiness underpinning it. The body is moderately creamy, which balances the mild fresh-baked bread character quite well, and it offers a curious touch of brown sugar and cinnamon on the back end. Guinness Blonde American Lager is both filling to the stomach and pleasing on the tongue. It’s hardly the deep dive into the abyss that standard Guinness Stout is, but it makes for an interesting foil to the standard Guinness bloodline — and an obvious choice for the bottom half of a Black and Tan.

5% abv. Available September 2014.

A- / $9 per six-pack / guinness.com

Review: Tap Rye Port Finished Canadian Rye Whisky

Tap rye White 525x1100 Review: Tap Rye Port Finished Canadian Rye Whisky

Astute readers might recall Tap 357 Maple Rye Whisky — made with maple syrup, natch — which we reviewed a few years ago. Now Tap is back, ditching the 357 for its second product, a Canadian rye that’s been intriguingly finished in Port wine barrels.

Limited production information is available. This is a blend of pot-distilled Canadian ryes aged up to 8 years in barrel. A limited edition, the company says it will not be produced again after this production run is sold out. No mashbill information is available, but the whisky is finished in Port barrels and then gets a touch of actual Port wine added to the final product before cold filtration.

All of that aside, I can readily report that the acorn doesn’t fall far from the tree here — or rather, the sap doesn’t drip far from it. The nose is immediately full of maple syrup and cinnamon-raisin oatmeal. I would have guessed it was a flavored whiskey if I didn’t know better. Exotic nose aside, the body is gentle and indistinct, much like Tap 357, offering a fairly simple blended whisky experience that features mild grains, gentle wood notes, and light touches of brown sugar and burnt caramel. Port? Maybe you catch a touch of raisins on the nose, but otherwise the dessert wine’s distinctive character, so amazing when done right as a whiskey finish, is all but absent in the finished product here.

84 proof.

B / $40 / tapwhisky.com

Review: Vizcaya VXOP Cask No. 21 Cuban Formula Rum

vizcaya 21 525x794 Review: Vizcaya VXOP Cask No. 21 Cuban Formula Rum

Don’t get too excited: Vizcaya’s “Cuban Formula” rum is actually made in the Dominican Republic. Don’t let that disappoint you, though; this is a masterfully produced rum that’s brimming with flavor and sophistication.

There’s not a lot of production information about this rum to share. For starters, the “21” on the label is a bit misleading. There’s certainly no actual cask #21 from which this rum is drawn — unless it’s a cask that holds hundreds of thousands of gallons of spirit and is constantly being refilled. The number is there to trick you into thinking it’s a 21 year old product, even though the label doesn’t say anything of the sort. In fact, Vizcaya doesn’t say much at all about its rums except that they’re made from sugar cane and aged in oak barrels, both of which are obvious.

None of that actually matters, though. As noted above, Vizcaya Cask 21 is actually an amazing product that I’m happy to recommend.

The nose is bursting with classic aged rum notes: vanilla, butterscotch, and plenty of cinnamon. The body follows suit perfectly. The rum is almost candylike but its sweetness is tempered with baking spices, smoldering oak notes, and just a hint of fire on the back end. Over time some tertiary notes emerge, including caramel apple, toasted marshmallow, and almond brittle. The finish isn’t particularly long, but there’s so much flavor on the palate that it doesn’t entirely matter. This rum drinks beautifully, and at $40 a bottle, it’s almost an absurd value.

80 proof.

A / $40 / vizcayarum.com

Get Your Mountain on in Lake Tahoe, Sept. 5-7, 2014

Craving some mountain air… and maybe a beer or a glass of wine? Check out Lake Tahoe’s Autumn Food and Wine Festival, coming up in just a few weeks. A full schedule of the three-day event is here. Many of the events are free with your admission. Some require an additional advance ticket purchase.

Best to hop on your lodging and travel reservations now. Hope to see you there!

Review: Bolla Prosecco and Sparkling Rose

BL Prosecco DOC 89x300 Review: Bolla Prosecco and Sparkling RoseBolla makes wines in a wide range of qualities, but these sparklers decidedly tip the lowest end of the price scale. Thoughts follow.

NV Bolla Prosecco Treviso DOC –  100% Glera grapes. Harmless, with a moderate level of carbonation and fruit right from the start. The body offers big apple and pear notes, touches of grapefruit, and a finish reminiscent of creamy vanilla wafers. Like many budget Proseccos, it is simultaneously unmemorable and wholly drinkable on a hot day. B / $10

NV Bolla Sparkling Rose Wine – Don’t call it Prosecco: This sparkler is merely from “Italy” (actually the Veneto region, the very home of Prosecco) and is made from Pinot Blanc, Pinot Noir, and Raboso grapes. Very light fizz. Very fruity, with strong peach overtones and notes of cotton candy. The sugary sweetness goes on for days. It’s not sparkling white zinfandel, but it’s edging dangerously close to that territory. C / $12

bolla.com

2 More Wines from the International Wine of the Month Club

bellingham bernard series small barrel smv 2011 1 169x300 2 More Wines from the International Wine of the Month ClubThe good folks at the International Wine of the Month Club didn’t think our D- rating on one of their recent offerings was representative of the club’s offerings, so we invited them to submit another pair of samples for consideration. (For what it’s worth, I was also told that if you really don’t like one of the bottles the club sends you, they will replace it.)

So here we go with two more reviews from the IWMC’s cellars. You can read all about the club and how it works at the above link. Thoughts on the new wines follow.

2012 Chateau La Croix de Queynac Bordeaux Blanc – Americans drink precious little white Bordeaux, but this budget bottling from the Right Bank shows that perhaps we should do otherwise. Loaded with tropical fruit, lemon, oranges, and a touch of floral elements, it’s a lightly sweet sipper that works well as a summer refresher and as a companion to lighter dinner fare. B+ / $12

2011 Bellingham Wines The Bernard Series S.M.V. Small Barrel – This is a South African blend of 75% Shiraz, 22% Mourvedre, and 3% Viognier. Big and burly, this is a chewy wine that combines a big Aussie Shiraz with an earthy Cote-Rotie. Initially a bit jarring, the intensity settles down to reveal dark blackberry, tea leaf, dark chocolate, and some wood. It’s a powerful wine but not one without ample charms, finishing sweet and focused on its chocolate-covered fruit. Those looking for restraint and finesse may give it a pass. B+ / $31

winemonthclub.com

Review: General Beauregard Dixie Southern Vodka

Dixie bottles new labels 525x827 Review: General Beauregard Dixie Southern Vodka

If there’s one thing the South is known for it’s… vodka, amirite!?

Made by Chicken Cock Distillers in Charleston, South Carolina (see also our reviews of Chicken Cock whiskeys), this vodka is made from GMO-free South-friendly corn, 6x distilled, and filtered through an authentic Confederate flag. OK, I made up that last part. Actually, it is treated with the “TerrePURE” process, which uses “ultrasonic energy and oxygenation to enhance drinkability by reducing impurities in the distillate.” I think the flag idea sounds better, though.

Anyway.

The vodka itself is well made but not distinctive. Lightly medicinal, with hints of pastry cream and lemons on the nose. The body follows suit, with few surprises. It offers a gentle creaminess and a lightly sweet touch on the palate, touches of hospital character, and a pleasant, moderate finish. It drinks just fine on its own, but it’s neutral enough to work in any cocktail you want to throw at it.

80 proof. Flavored expressions (including black pepper — what!?) not reviewed.

B+ / $20  / islandclubbrands.com

Review: Bluewater Distilling Organic Vodka and Halcyon Gin

bluewater halcyon gin 88x300 Review: Bluewater Distilling Organic Vodka and Halcyon GinBluewater Distilling in Everett, Washington makes a variety of spirits (including an aquavit!), but it’s best known for two major staples, a gin and a vodka, both organically produced and crafted in a classic copper pot still — not a column still, which is by far the norm for most vodkas and gins.

Thoughts on both of these spirits follow.

Bluewater Organic Vodka – Pot-distilled from organic wheat. Immediately enticing. Classic, old-world nose, with rich light medicinal character and undertones of old wood and wet earth. This intriguing aroma leads you into an even more engaging palate. The body is surprisingly mild and easygoing, yet it’s quite punchy with flavor. It kicks off with notes of toffee and butterscotch, then develops fruit and acidity as it builds on the tongue. Within a few seconds, it’s pummeling the palate with lemongrass and grapefruit, black pepper, and some pine tree/cedar notes. The finish is both silky and sharp, but lacking in the expected astringency. One of those vodkas that’s easy to sip on at length, even at room temperature. 80 proof. A / $27

Bluewater Halcyon Organic Distilled Gin – Note that the “Bluewater” is very small on the bottle here. You’ll most likely find it listed under “Halcyon” instead. The wheat-based distillate on this London Gin style gin is crafted with a classic 24-hour infusion of juniper, orange, lemon, coriander, angelica root, orris root, licorice root, and cassia bark. The intense nose features lots of fruit, modest juniper, and some spongy, earthy notes driven by a few of the root-based ingredients. Unlike with the vodka, there are few surprises on the palate here. Lemon and orange remain strong, and the juniper is a bit more present on the tongue than the initial nosing would indicate. All in all it is stylistically on par with many a UK-crafted gin and a versatile spirit that works in all kinds of classic cocktails. 92 proof. A- / $30

bluewaterdistilling.com

Review: 2012 Starmont Pinot Noir and Chardonnay

Starmont 2012 StanlyRanchEstate Chardonnay 104x300 Review: 2012 Starmont Pinot Noir and ChardonnayTwo new high-end wines from this adjunct of the Merryvale Winery, located in Napa Valley. Both are exquisite offerings. Thoughts follow.

2012 Starmont Pinot Noir Stanly Ranch Estate Carneros – Gorgeous Carneros Pinot, light as a feather with silky notes of tea leaf, cherry, cola, and a little strawberry. Seductive on the nose, it’s got a brisk attack and a long, lasting finish. This is one of those pinots that you just drink and drink and keep pouring and pouring and then it’s gone and you sigh and think that, yeah, someone there knows what they’re doing. A / $55

2012 Starmont Chardonnay Stanly Ranch Estate Carneros – Buttery Chardonnay, but not overpoweringly woody. Instead it provides notes of vanilla, peaches, a touch of pineapple, and a lemon spritz on the finish. Touches of roasted meats on the back end as well. On the whole, it’s nicely balanced and very easy drinking — and it’s lovely with fish. A / $45

merryvale.com

Review: 2 Wines from the SommSelect Website

1162291x 125x300 Review: 2 Wines from the SommSelect WebsiteIf you’ve ever seen the documentary Somm, you will remember Ian Cauble, the bright-eyed sommelier who seems like a shoo-in to pass the Master Sommelier test administered at the end of the film. I won’t spoil what happens in the movie, but fast forward to today, and Cauble has his own internet wine website, SommSelect. Essentially a spin on the “daily deal” website, SommSelect is focused on bringing limited-release, high-end, international wines to market at discount prices. You won’t find $5 bargain bins here, mind you. The two wines the company sent us to try out both hover around $40 retail (though pricing as they appeared on the SommSelect site during their original offer is not available).

I can’t comment on SommSelect’s service — though the website seems really straightforward and you get free shipping if you buy just two bottles — but I can talk about a couple of the wines the company recently had on offer. Thoughts follow.

2011 Clos du Mont-Olivet Chateauneuf-du-Pape Cuvee Unique – This southern Rhone wine drinks like a much more mature bottling than it is, rich with earth tones, raisiny/Port notes, and some chalkiness. Despite a somewhat harsh attack on the palate, a little too balsamic-meets-barnyard for my taste, the wine settles down as it gets some air, offering notes of blackberry jam and distinct notes of fruit-flavored tea. An intriguing combination of Old World and New World, though ultimately those barnyard notes are tough to shake. B / $47

2012 Chanin Wines Chardonnay Los Alamos Vineyard Santa Barbara – Surprisingly tart and lemony for a Chardonnay, only 15% of this wine is finished in new oak, the rest remaining in neutral oak barrels. Bright with fruit and grassy notes, it does open up as it warms (as Cauble’s tasting notes promise), revealing apricot notes, creme brulee, ginger, and a seductively mushroomy, earthy backbone. A- / $38

sommselect.com

Three Days on the Juice with Urban Remedy

001 525x393 Three Days on the Juice with Urban Remedy

Behold: my fridge (in part) on day one.

So my wife got us doing a juice cleanse. It’s all the rage, ain’t it? So why not? We can all use a little detox once in awhile. It’s not a trend I’m smitten with, but I’ll try just about anything once.

Urban Remedy, like many juice providers, offers a three-day cleanse kit that includes 18 pints of organic, cold-pressed juice, which you drink over the course of 72 hours, essentially every 2 hours during daylight time. Urban Remedy actually has a number of different cleanse kits; we opted for the Signature Cleanse, which the company says is its most popular product. Each day presents six different juices to drink, ranging from the veggie-heavy green Brainiac you get at 9am to the cashew milk-based Relax that comes along at 7pm.

For a few days before the cleanse, you’re supposed to wean yourself off of big meals, caffeine, alcohol, and everything else. Largely we ate small vegetarian dishes in the run-up to cleansing. The night before we started, dinner was a sweet potato and some kale.

The next morning, we had at it.

Across the board, the juices mostly taste fine. I even found the celery-laden Brainiac to be a pleasant mix of sweet and bitter, and the addition of considerable cayenne to the #2 Time Machine brightens up its exceedingly tart composition. #4, After Party, a pblend of carrot, apple, beets, ginger, and lemon, was my runaway favorite. My least favorite, oddly, was the chalky and somewhat bland #5 juice, Warrior, which looks smoothie-like only because of the addition of chia seeds. It’s supposed to be made with raspberries but strawberries were used due to a “shortage” — maybe the raspberry version tastes better.

Hunger is of course a big issue for many who juice, but Urban Cleanse has you downing so much juice that, while it was always on my mind, it wasn’t that big of a deal at the start. What I really missed, much to my surprise, was the ritual of eating. Not just sitting down at the table but physically putting food in my mouth and chewing it up. Sounds weird, but I’m starting to think the reason so many of us snack all day is just to chew on stuff. (I’m not alone here.)

That said, at various points in the cleanse I admit I was feeling quite hungry (though not “starving”) and not entirely clear headed. I found it harder to focus on work and just less motivated, both of which were exacerbated by all the running to the bathroom to pee. (You are drinking a lot of juice here. I swear I have never peed so much in my life.) That said, I did manage to get plenty of work done over those three days, maybe because I spent so much less time eating.

On day two I woke up not very hungry, but with a bit of a headache. Urban Cleanse says that’s common, and it’s usually due to caffeine withdrawal. I’ve been off caffeine for a full week, though, so with me the effect is something else. The company also warned of decreased mental clarity on day two, but I mainly just felt tired and low in energy.

By day three I was ready to be done with it all. I dutifully worked my way through the juices, wiped the headache away with a hot shower, and tried to keep my energy up, but sitting on the couch was how I spent most of the day. Before lunch I had to carry a heavy box up a flight of stairs and by the end of it I felt like I’d run a mile. With so few calories (just 1200 per day) and almost no protein, even mild activity becomes a huge strain. By the afternoon I’d plotted out with a bit of drool on my lips what my next 8 or 9 meals were going to be: nothing insane, because Urban Cleanse suggests “easing back in” to food, and, of course, I do want to try to keep eating healthy for the long term.

I lost quite a bit of weight on the cleanse, about 4 pounds in 3 days (and more if you include the pre-cleanse time). I missed eating but it was manageable, and I never “cheated” on the cleanse during its run. Part of the idea with the cleanse is to teach yourself about healthy eating habits and reset your diet. While I’m not going to start eating flax seeds and freekeh at every meal, I am more cognizant now of healthier dining choices and, especially, portion size.

That said, I’m totally getting a steak at the next opportunity.

urbanremedy.com

Tasting the Wines of Washington’s Columbia Winery with Winemaker Sean Hails

1288 300x225 Tasting the Wines of Washingtons Columbia Winery with Winemaker Sean HailsThough we’re only a few hundred miles away, here in California we honestly don’t see many wines from Washington state. And yet, after California, Washington has the 2nd largest number of wineries in the country.

Columbia is one of them. Not to be confused with Columbia Crest, Columbia recently became part of the Gallo empire, rebranded and relabeled its bottles, and hired Sean Hails to oversee the operation. With a focus on affordable bottlings (plus a large number of unique offerings sold only in the winery’s tasting room), Columbia seems to be keeping quality high and prices low.

I recently dined with winemaker Hails at Sausailto’s Murray Circle, where we tasted through the 2012 vintage of three of the company’s flagship wines, all bargains at $14 a bottle. Thoughts follow.

2012 Columbia Winery Chardonnay Columbia Valley – 89% chardonnay with some semillon and chenin blanc. This is a crisp wine with apple and lemon notes, some baking spice, and good acid. Really well made all around, with the fruit doing most of the talking. A-

2012 Columbia Winery Merlot Columbia Valley – 85% merlot, plus cabernet and syrah. Licorice and some smoke on the nose, but the body is all fruit, with well-integrated tannins and a simple blackberry/strawberry/raspberry character to it. Simple, well-honed finish. A-

2012 Columbia Winery Cabernet Sauvignon Columbia Valley – 86% cabernet sauvignon, with touches of petit verdot, syrah, and malbec. The only wine not totally ready to drink here, it’s thick with tannin and tight  but offers some jammy fruit, tempered with dusty notes of charcoal. This is a simpler wine but one which can handle food well. B+

columbiawinery.com

 

Review: 3 Wines from Four Vines, 2014 Releases

four vines 128x300 Review: 3 Wines from Four Vines, 2014 ReleasesThree new releases from our friends at Four Vines. Thoughts follow.

2012 Four Vines Naked Unoaked Chardonnay Santa Barbara – Unoaked as promised, which leaves this SoCal Chard buttery without being stuffed full of wood and sawdust notes. The body’s bigger than most unoaked Chardonnays I’ve experienced of late, which is a nice balance to the wine’s natural acidity. Some light vanilla biscuit notes round out the finish. Great price on this. A- / $10

2011 Four Vines Biker Zinfandel Paso Robles – A big, chocolaty Zin, dense with raisiny, Port-like notes, ample sweetness, notes of vanilla, and a nice chocolate kick on the back end. Plays poorly with food but can work all right as an after-dinner sipper. B / $20

2011 Four Vines Truant Zinfandel California Old Vines – A meatier, more nuanced Zin, loaded with chocolate but balanced by notes of plum and blackberry, some smoke, and some earthy bramble notes. Better balance here than in the overblown Biker, and better both on its own and with a meal. Another outstanding value. A- / $10

fourvines.com

Review: Rivulet Artisan Pecan Liqueur

Rivulet03B 525x787 Review: Rivulet Artisan Pecan Liqueur

Rivulet isn’t exactly a boozy praline in a glass, but it’s gettin’ there. As an enthusiast of all things Cajun, I mean that as a compiment.

Made from barrel-aged brandy, pecans, and other secret ingredients (sugar, methinks!), Rivulet offers a rich, toasty pecan nose with undercurrents of cinnamon, cloves, and brown sugar. The body is unctuous and deep, full of nutty flavor and backed with a ton of sweetness. The sweetness is what sticks with you, just like that slowly melting sugar of a good praline, coating the back of the mouth while the nuts take on a more glazed, dessert-like quality.

Nut-oriented liqueurs are often a simple experience along these lines, and Rivulet is no exception, bringing just about the right amount of sweetness to bear on one of my favorite nuts. It sips well on its own, excels in dessert cocktails in lieu of amaretto and its ilk, and undoubtedly has lots of utility in the world of baked goods.

60 proof.

A- / $24 / rivulet.com

A Deep Dive Into Robert Mondavi’s To Kalon Vineyard with Winemaker Nova Cadamatre

New to the Robert Mondavi winemaking team is Nova Cadamatre, who hosted a few dozen writers recently to an exploration of various Robert Mondavi Cabernet releases, all of which hail in total or in part from the famed To Kalon Vineyard, which is adjacent to the Mondavi winery facility.

Cadamatre guided us through seven wines — four freshly vinted varietals straight from various To Kalon blocks (all harvested in 2013, they’ve been in barrel for about 9 months), and three finished wines, all Cabs, from the 2010 vintage.

The idea here was to see how the vineyard impacts the wine. These three Cabs represent a wide range of Mondavi’s offerings, including the $28 Cabernet Sauvignon Napa Valley, which uses a small portion of To Kalon in its blend; the $55 Cabernet Sauvignon Oakville, which is 99% To Kalon; and the $145 Cabernet Sauvignon Reserve, a collectible wine that is also almost entirely from the To Kalon vineyard — but is made from different blocks than the Oakville.

To be sure, grapes matter. The Napa Valley Cab (B) bottling is pretty enough and drinkable, but not really anything to write home about. The Oakville (A-) offers better balance, more jam and chocolate, with distinct blackberry and blueberry notes. It’s a considerable improvement, as the price tag should indicate, too. The Reserve (A) is, as expected, the best of the lot, though it is bound in quite a bit of tannin at present, showing raisins, bramble, and some flinty earth notes. Here, in comparison to the Oakville bottling, you can really see the different a few hundred yards and older vines make, even if value remains subjective.

Looking at the barrel samples, it was easier to see how older vines led to more complex wines. Wine made from very young vines from To Kalon was heavy on fruit and flowers, with molasses notes behind. As the vines got older — 15 and then 30 years old — tannins grew and the fruit became less simplistic, more wrapped up with wood notes and showing strong herbal character.

The moral of the story: Vineyards matter, vineyard position matters, and older vines can lead to complex wines — at least in the case of Robert Mondavi Cabernet. While I’m not suggesting you get seduced by the appearance of “Old Vines” on a wine label — the term is meaningless and is usually reserved for Zinfandel in the U.S. — it’s something you can leverage as a consumer next time you’re getting chatted up in a tasting room. Ask about vine age. See if your expectations match what’s in the glass. If you can, try the same experiment with wines made from the same vineyard but from vines of different ages — and see what your palate has to say.

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